SS United States For Sale


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James Carey

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Sep 14, 2004
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Thanks for the correction. That makes it worse, for a gutted shell of a ship. She is much better off as a reef of the coast of the US. Besides, there wouldn't be that much pre-cleanup to do and she would be a great sport divers destination with all her interiors wide open.
 

Grant Carman

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Jun 19, 2006
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To me, the only way she can be saved is for someone with the willingness to take risks, like Sir Richard Branson, to buy her and fund her restoration.

Having taken Virgin Atlantic to England, and Virgin Trains in England, he does an amazing job. I don't know if even he could make a go of it, but maybe he, or someone like him could.

But in all seriousness, her time is over, and she will go for scrap. But then, I've been wrong before.

Once I think.
happy.gif
 
Jun 10, 1999
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Grant, or perhaps Bill Gates can save her, renaming her...S.S. United Bill Gates.

And, it seems to me a show just aired lastnight on the "Bug U", however it was via digital television. My cable TV only goes as far as channel 70.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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On the alt.history.ocean-liners.titanic Daniel Butler has published a sober article about United States. (It's in the thread about SS France).

Daniel points out the many difficulties in the way of restoration and makes a strong case against it. Interestingly, this patriotic American says that the ship is of little historic value compared to Queen Mary, which helped so much to win WW II. By comparison, what did United States achieve?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>By comparison, what did United States achieve?<<

The fastest trans-Atlantic crossing by any liner before or since and a lot of very red ink, even with the subsidies. From a technological standpoint, the ship wasn't even all that groundbreaking. She was fast, but that was because Gibbs and Cox took an aircraft carrier's propulsion plant and built a liner around it instead of a warship. Clever but hardly rocket science.
 

Brent Holt

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I believe with the operating subsidy, the SSUS made money until about 1961. (According to one of Bill Miller's books)
I am surprised about a price of $20,000,000. That seems to be just a "tad" high. The Big U was purchased in 1992 for just above scrap value at $2.6 million and that would work out at $3.7 million in 2007 dollars. (Of course supply and demand will cause those figures to fluctuate.)

Unfortunately, it is very likely that the Big Us next crossing will be a long tow to the scrappers. The hard core truth is that very few people care. There is also not much of a market for floating hotels, sadly.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I am surprised about a price of $20,000,000. That seems to be just a "tad" high.<<

Sounds to me like the present owners are trying to milk it for all it's worth. Since the price of scrap steel looks set to go down due to an expected glut in the market...all that older tonnage going to Alang...it strikes me as wishful thinking on their part.
 

Deborah Kogan

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Jan 29, 2003
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I just want you folks to know that there is an article about it in today's Philadelphia Inquirer- "SOS for a National Treasure", by Dan McSweeney, VP of the SSUS Conservancy. Horrible news; I love that ship.
 
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Kyle Johnstone

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What was the purchase price that NCL paid for the BigU?

What is her current scrap value?

Could the one hundred million that Dubai paid for the QE2 brand lead Star to believe that twenty million is a fare deal for the SS United States brand, though an empty rusty shell with a famous profile?
 

Deborah Kogan

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I'm not sure if I am late in mentioning it, but this morning there was a news item on the radio (WHYY, an NPR affiliate) that the S.S.U.S. has been put up for sale with a broker, and NCL has given assurances that she will not be sold to a non-U.S. entity or sold for scrap. There is a news item on the S.S. United States Conservancy site to that effect, as of 3/16.
 

James Carey

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NCL's parent company pulled a fast one on the Norway, so look out for them to sell SSUS to an American investor, who then turns around and sells her for scrap.

Not saying that will happen, but don't be fooled by the wording of what they say. They are out to make a buck and do not care for sentiments.
 

Grant Carman

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James

That was my inital thought.

Unless NCL makes re-selling for scrap verboten as part of the terms of sale, the SSUS will go the way of the Norway and the Independance, which by the way is not to be found, making me think she went to a small scrapper in China rather than India or Bangladesh. They say she's in Dubai, but no one has seen her. The same thing could happen here as well.
 
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