SS United States Philadelphia Harbor


Jul 9, 2000
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>>Isn't it also true that this ship's interior contains no large open areas because of the US Military's fear of fires?<<

I'd have to see a set of good deck plans before I could answer that one, but I don't think it was the Navy's fear of fires but a fear overall that resulted in fireproofing being taken to extremes. The Morro Castle was a bitter lesson which wasn't forgotten by Gibbs and Cox.

Doesn't sound like a good selling point for cruisers these days.<<

It probably wasn't. Even then, the United States might well have been a success if only because being the fastest liner on the North Atlantic run would have been quite a selling point. Unfortunately, Mr. Boeing with the 707 had the last laugh. Why take three and a half days to get there when you can do so in a few hours?
 

Jerry Nuovo

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Jan 18, 2003
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I am beginning to think that NCL really had no intention of bringing the S.S.United States back into service and I think I remember that NCL only bought the ship because the rumor is that some other cruise operator was interested in buying her and NCL wanted to stifle the competition.I hope I am wrong with this opinion but I have not heard any news from NCL concerning the S.S.United States and if the bad day comes and NCL sells the S.S.United States for scrap I really hope that ends up as a public relations disaster for NCL and I would urge anybody who reads and or contributes to this forum to boycott the bastards at NCL and not take a cruise on any NCL Ship.Too bad concerning the S.S.United States because I would love to be able to take a cruise aboard that ship.But I have to face reality and predict that will never happen.And remember if NCL sells the S.S.United States for scrap please boycott NCL.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Well, boycotting is your option, but personally, I don't do them. Business realities have to dictate some of their moves because of their obligation to give their stockholders a return on their investment and there were probably some legal hurdles they had to get past in order to be able to offer some of the services their customers want.

They also may well have intended to bring the ship back into service, but the plans ended up being stillborn. Remember the timing and some of the troubles the cruise industry had in the wake of the 9-11 terrorist attacks? The ship may have been barely recoverable at the time, but the plans were shelved because the cash flow vanished.

It brings to mind what happened to White Star at about the time The Great Depression hit. Supposedly, they had a 1000 footer on the stocks at Harland and Wolff, but if they did, there were Lord Kyslant's financial shenanigans coupled with the Great Depression which threw a monkey wrench in the works forever.

Such is life. You always get sucker punched by the unexpected.
 
Apr 16, 2006
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The Norway was making good revenue at the time of the explosion. I know this, because I am part of an organization working to save her. If NCL was willing to get rid of the Norway, one of thier most popular ships at the time, they would have had no intention of restoring the US. And I don't really believe that it had that much to do with prestige. The average person has never even heard of the Blue Ribbon, let alone the SSUS. I think they just bought her because she was available and nessecary.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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Thank you for the deck plans. I'm wondering if the partitions are still in place. Everyone refers to the hull, particularly below the waterline, as being in such terrible shape. How does anyone know this for a fact?
I doubt she'll ever run, but retro-fitted with her sickle shaped props, re-engined, repainted and re-decorated, she might make a feasible Atlantic runner.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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You know, NCL could do a lot worse than offer the ship to the City of New York, cosmetically fix it up and call it the NCL "S.S. United States" conference Center". It would bring all kinds of good will to the company, get them out of a bind, and re-establish the presence of the trans-Atlantic liner fleet in NYC. COuld be a great tax dodge, too! It's merely a thought.
 

Jeremy Lee

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Jun 12, 2003
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Hopefully something will be done in the near future, however due to cash problems its easier said than done, but this piece of history must be preserved. It will be wonderful if she ever returns into service as an ocean liner again.
 
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christopher marshall

Guest
you can also see the Ols ss Norway in bremenhaven in germany on goolge earth and she is now gone
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
At the risk of asking a stupid question stupidly - sitting where it is in Philadelphia - is it floating or is it sitting on the bottom?

Wayne
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Wayne, as far as I know, the ship is actually afloat. However gutted and neglected it is otherwise, the hull itself is still quite sound. The ship could be made habitable, serviceable, seaworthy and even able move under her own power. The problem is that it would take a massive amount of funding to make it happen. Far more then anybody has or can justify investing in these times.
 

Brent Holt

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Jun 23, 2002
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I believe a survey done for NCL years ago concluded that the Big Us hull was 93% sound. Building her to navy standards obviously helped.
However, I have heard that her aluminium superstructure has issues.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>However, I have heard that her aluminium superstructure has issues.<<

And I'll bet the big issue is corrosion, particularly where the aluminium meets the steel. The Navy had the same problems with it's early guided missile cruisers. It was a great way to cut down topweight but different metals exposed to salt water tend to eat themselves up.
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
Thanks for the answer. I live, and have stayed overnight on the Battleship Alabama, and in that case, they "preserved" the ship by basically burying quite a bit of the hull in the sand. This led to a lot of hull corrosion, that had to be fixed later. Hence my curiosity about the US sitting on the bottom.

Wayne
 
Apr 27, 2005
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With the price of scrap what it is, I would think the Chinese would jump to cut up the United States, piecemeal. Oh wait! They've been doing that for years!
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
Or they might just buy it and fix it up as a troopship for use in invading an island - the symbology might be too much to resist.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>With the price of scrap what it is, I would think the Chinese would jump to cut up the United States, piecemeal.<<

I'm not sure that scrap dealers will be flying to this one. There are some concerns that the market for scrap steel is about to take a nosedive, the reason being a glut on the market. While aquiring the ship would be cheap, the market itself may well make doing the work now a money losing proposition.
 

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