Staircase without clock carvings/additional info on cherubs?


pipeorganest

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Apr 16, 2012
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I am searching for a photo of a staircase, presumably olympics, of the staircase missing the clock carvings/and cherub post on olympic missing cherubs, or if there is one?
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Not sure what you are looking for. However I do not know of any image showing the clock carvings missing. There is only 1 picture which was taken about October 1935 (when Olympic went to the scrapyard) where the cherub was removed.
 

James Garrett

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Sep 24, 2011
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Perhaps you are thinking of the aft 1st class staircase on the Olympic and presumably on the Titanic.

The forward 1st class staircase had the famous "Honor and Glory Crowning Time" of course, but the aft staircase did not. The clock was roughly in the same position but had a simpler surround of wood molding. I first saw this picture of the aft 1st class staircase on page 153 in the book "Titanic & Her Sisters Olympic & Britannic" by Tom McCluskie, Michael Sharpe, and Leo Marriott. They may have mis-identified the picture a bit as the caption reads "Olympic's first class staircase was identical to Titanic's with the exception of Olympic's clock which was far less ornate." I believe that the Olympic's clock in the FORWARD 1st class staircase was just as ornate as the equivalent in the Titanic; The book "Titanic Voices" has a picture of the clock sculpture saved from the Olympic that is now on display in the Southampton Maritime Museum.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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The forward 1st class staircase had the famous "Honor and Glory Crowning Time" of course, but the aft staircase did not. The clock was roughly in the same position but had a simpler surround of wood molding. I first saw this picture of the aft 1st class staircase on page 153 in the book "Titanic & Her Sisters Olympic & Britannic" by Tom McCluskie, Michael Sharpe, and Leo Marriott. They may have mis-identified the picture a bit as the caption reads "Olympic's first class staircase was identical to Titanic's with the exception of Olympic's clock which was far less ornate."
Sorry to say but that book is full of mistakes!
 

James Garrett

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Sorry to say but that book is full of mistakes!
Ioannis, I do realize that; in fact I pointed out one of the mistakes in my post that you quoted. It is unfortunate because when I purchased that book, I was amazed by the many photos that I had not seen before. This was before the Titanic The Ship Magnificent was published. As I became more knowledgeable about the Titanic and the Olympic class, I did notice quite a few picture caption mistakes such as a couple of pictures of the newly launched Britannic incorrectly identified as the Titanic. From what I know only the Britannic of the three Olympic class ships was launched with the forward A Deck promenade already enclosed. Even worse, a picture of the HMHS Aquatania during WW1 is labeled in the book as the HMHS Britannic!

It is still possible that the original post may have referred to the aft 1st class staircase and its clock.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Same goes with the book "Anatomy of the Titanic" by McCluskie which had some mistakes in the text and many miss labelled pictures. Several Olympic or even Britannic pictures claimed to be the Titanic! As Jason stated Titanic - The Ship Magnificent is much better. Of course they also use non Titanic pictures but they mention it! (Birth of the Titanic by Michael McCaughan is also a good one but did not go much into detail.)

I am not sure to which picture the original post referred to. I would agree that possibly he meant the aft 1st class staircase but on the other side he stated that the staircase had not cherubs which the aft staircase of course has.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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You can find a picture in the book "Olympic - Titanic - Britannic - An Illustrated History of the Olympic Class Ships" by Mark Chirnside or "RMS OLYMPIC" by Brian Hawley.

There is nothing special about that picture. The cherub was removed shortly before the auction at Jarrow in October 1935 before they started to scrap the ship.