Stanley Lord guilty as charged


Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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Jim, were some companies shall we say, more puritanical than others with regards to the crew having a drink ?

When my Grandad was with the BI in the fifties, he says they were allowed to drink watered down beer in the mess room, it was pretty weak stuff though. The officers and engineers on BI ships often ate in the saloon with the passengers and were allowed one glass of spirits at dinner.

The surviving crew of the Titanic were adamant at the enquiries that there was no drinking allowed at all on their late ship, whilst Captain Barr of the Mount Temple (a CP ship) testified at the enquiries that he had issued rum to his firemen to spur them on during their abortive rescue mission.
I can't speak for other Companies, Seamus, but the Friday Bond opening , the free tot of rum a week and the self-regulating system seem to have been the norm for other ranks on MN cargo vessels way back then.
However, I did serve on Anchor Line passenger vessels. There, the junior officers shared a table in the main dining saloon for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Alcohol was not served to them. The seniors each had a table with invited guest passengers. However Officers on daytime Watch were allowed to have a pint brought to them in their cabin by the Officer's steward... one pint...and as a relaxer at the end of a 4 hour stint on their feet on the bridge. You must remember that in those days, there was no air conditioning and an afternoon Watch on the bridge during Reed Sea passage was a real swelterer and there was no respite at night. Consequently, dehydration was a real problem. (not that booze was the answer but I'm sure that a nice long cool one went down a treat). I remember feeling so sorry for the poor bloody passengers way down on E deck at sea level... particularly in bad weather when they couldn't open a port to get a breath of cool,fresh air.
Officers did not openly imbibe but usually ordered a "docking-bottle" of spirit the day before arrival at a port in which they were to spend some time or from which they were going on leave.
Ooops! sorry for "swinging the lantern":cool:
 
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Then, of course, there is the possibility of a speed a little more than 15 knots helped by a push from the North Atlantic Current.
If Carpathia was at the position Rostron thought she was when she turned around, then she would have been about 47 miles from the wreck site and about 3½ hours away at an overall average speed made good of about 13.5 knots. She would not have been helped by the NA current but rather hindered. At forced draft, she was realistically making about 15 knots through the water.
 

Jim Currie

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If Carpathia was at the position Rostron thought she was when she turned around, then she would have been about 47 miles from the wreck site and about 3½ hours away at an overall average speed made good of about 13.5 knots. She would not have been helped by the NA current but rather hindered. At forced draft, she was realistically making about 15 knots through the water.
As I said, Sam,. the calculated distance from where Rostron turned was 48.6 miles.. that is by Mercator Sailing calculation.
When he turned and since he was heading N 52 W, he would have had the North Atlantic Current acting on his port bow. At that place, it usually sets about ENE at 1 knot or a little more. In fact, if you care to plot it, you will find that if Rostron average 15 knots from the turn, and made good NW True, he would have been set about 3 miles eastward and 3 miles to the north east i,e, the current was at that time, setting NE at about 1 knot at that place.
 

Julian Atkins

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Sep 23, 2017
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Hi Jim,

I like all this Carpathia stuff!

Would you concede that Rostron mucked up his quoted "2.40 am" sighting of the first green flare as being impossible, and that Dave Gittins' theory that Rostron was then 2 hours 40 minutes into the rescue run, and misinterpreted this as 2.40am is a very likely explanation?

This would also explain the timing of Cottam sending out a message from Carpathia, picked up by the Caronia and Durrant on The Mount Temple of a warning that Carpathia was firing rockets.

I didn't know the Carpathia had an elevated platform above and behind the bridge; and if it did, there is no evidence it was used that night.

Cheers,

Julian
 

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