Staterooms styles

Dec 2, 2000
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Jenny, if I may, you might find it helpful if you browse through some of the older discussions in this folder for the answers you're looking for. Keep in mind also that some bits of information may also be lost to history.
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Jenny, Michael,

Under "Stateroom Styles" in reply to an earlier post made by Jenny, Daniel advised "All will be revealed in due course when our book is released ......."
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hello Jenny,

Last week, Daniel Klistorner posted in reply to a similar question that you had about the styles of the cabins. His answer was "All will be revealed in due course when our book is released (see my signature for details)."

In light of this, I ask that you please do not post any other questions about the styles of the cabins and be patient until the book is released, which will be in April.

Thanks.

[Moderator's Note: This post and the four above it, originally posted in separate threads, have been merged with this one. JDT]
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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All,

While it has been stated that info on the styles of the cabins will be available when Titanic: The Ship Magnificent is released, there is no outright ban on discussing and asking questions on suite decor, since the book hasn't come out yet.
 
Dec 7, 2000
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The book contains very detailed explanations about the various period styles or non-period styles used on Titanic and goes into detail about what each cabin looked like - as such, I don't think it is necessary to go into this sort of detail here now as it will soon be available to everyone. For the time being though, C 96 was not decorated in a "period style".

Daniel.
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Hi Daniel,
This is my 1st post on Encyclopedia Titanica. I became interested in the Titanic in 1958 after seeing a movie on the sinking. I'm not even sure of the name of the movie, but have been hooked ever since. At the present, I'm decorating my guest room after cabin B57 with the elegant woodwork and 4 poster bed. I'm trying to get as much info as I can on this cabin and I have tried to get your book Titanic the ship Magnificent, but can't find it. Any suggestions?
Bob
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Hi everybody,
It's me again. As I said in my 1st post, I'm decorating my guest room after B57. Would anyone have a photo of what a couch looked liked in that cabin? Also was there only one bed and was it a single bed or a double? Any info would be appreciated. Thanks so much.
Bob
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Lester,
Thanks so much for that site. That's exactly what I was looking for. I heard from Daniel Klistorner and the cabin I'm looking for is B59. I now have the cabin furniture layout I needed, thanks to you. Thanks alot. Do you, by any chance, know the size of the cabin? The couch looks like a "fainting couch". I can't think of the actual name for it. It's fun trying to find the correct furniture for my guestroom. Thanks again, and any more info that you have would be appreciated. I'm new to ET and just love talking to people who have the same interest in Titanic that I do.
Bob
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Bob,

I understand 12ft by 18ft.

"fainting couch"? - I am not familiar with that terminology, but believe you mean a chasse-long, which is open at one end.
123578.jpg
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Lester,
Thanks again for this new info and photo. How have you learned so much about all of this? As I said earlier, I'm new to ET, and am really enjoying talking to people about the Titanic, which has been a passion of mine since I was a child. I think I must have been on the ship in a past life or something.Ha. Any info on B59 that you can find I would appreciate. Thanks again.
Bob
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Hello Bob,

The photo only shows what a chasse-long could look like. The ones I remember had legs on them as I believe did the ones on Titanic.

B-57 or B-59?
 
Feb 4, 2007
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Hi Robert,

Not to add to the confusion or anything (ha!) but the piece of furniture in question is also called a "chaise lounge".

See this image here for what Olympic's version of "B-59" looked like: View Image Note that the beds are very close together, and the room isn't as long ~ different layout from the Titanic, but the furniture would have been the same.

See here for a similar cabin on Olympic that shows what a "chaise lounge", "fainting couch", or "chasse-long" looks like. The furniture would have been identical on the Titanic: View Image

Both images are from H.P. Mutters & Zoon, who designed these special suites on both ships.
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Jason,
Thanks for the photos. Chaise lounge were the words I couldn't remember. I just love how helpful people are on this site. Thanks again.
Bob
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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That item of furniture was generally called a 'day bed'. These were commonly found in Edwardian drawing rooms, and looked like an ordinary upholstered armchair except for the extended seat. The term chaise longue ('long chair') would have been most appropriate, but that name was generally applied to the more couch-like items with an upholstered 'back' panel on the long side (as in Lester's pic). Confusing indeed. Here's a pic of a genuine Edwardian day bed which has been re-covered by an owner who presumably got the fabric cheap from a maker of circus tents!

123612.jpg
 
Jun 4, 2003
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By the way, would you choose such lavish outdoor staterooms or similar inside ones with no portholes? Would the price be the only criterion? Thanks in advance!
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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There wasn't any choice for the more lavish staterooms, George, as the 'inside' rooms were the cheap ones, relatively small and spartan. A passenger who could afford better might perhaps prefer an inside room if they were prone to 'mal de mer', as there would be slightly less roll nearer the centreline of the ship. Having no view of the sea might also help in that situation.