Staterooms styles

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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Lester,
Thanks so much for that site. That's exactly what I was looking for. I heard from Daniel Klistorner and the cabin I'm looking for is B59. I now have the cabin furniture layout I needed, thanks to you. Thanks alot. Do you, by any chance, know the size of the cabin? The couch looks like a "fainting couch". I can't think of the actual name for it. It's fun trying to find the correct furniture for my guestroom. Thanks again, and any more info that you have would be appreciated. I'm new to ET and just love talking to people who have the same interest in Titanic that I do.
Bob
 
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Lester Mitcham

Member
Hello Bob,

I understand 12ft by 18ft.

"fainting couch"? - I am not familiar with that terminology, but believe you mean a chasse-long, which is open at one end.
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Lester,
Thanks again for this new info and photo. How have you learned so much about all of this? As I said earlier, I'm new to ET, and am really enjoying talking to people about the Titanic, which has been a passion of mine since I was a child. I think I must have been on the ship in a past life or something.Ha. Any info on B59 that you can find I would appreciate. Thanks again.
Bob
 
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Lester Mitcham

Member
Hello Bob,

The photo only shows what a chasse-long could look like. The ones I remember had legs on them as I believe did the ones on Titanic.

B-57 or B-59?
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
Hi Robert,

Not to add to the confusion or anything (ha!) but the piece of furniture in question is also called a "chaise lounge".

See this image here for what Olympic's version of "B-59" looked like:
Olympic b59
Note that the beds are very close together, and the room isn't as long ~ different layout from the Titanic, but the furniture would have been the same.

See here for a similar cabin on Olympic that shows what a "chaise lounge", "fainting couch", or "chasse-long" looks like. The furniture would have been identical on the Titanic:
Olympic stateroom


Both images are from H.P. Mutters & Zoon, who designed these special suites on both ships.
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Jason,
Thanks for the photos. Chaise lounge were the words I couldn't remember. I just love how helpful people are on this site. Thanks again.
Bob
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
That item of furniture was generally called a 'day bed'. These were commonly found in Edwardian drawing rooms, and looked like an ordinary upholstered armchair except for the extended seat. The term chaise longue ('long chair') would have been most appropriate, but that name was generally applied to the more couch-like items with an upholstered 'back' panel on the long side (as in Lester's pic). Confusing indeed. Here's a pic of a genuine Edwardian day bed which has been re-covered by an owner who presumably got the fabric cheap from a maker of circus tents!

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George Pastarmatzis

Member
By the way, would you choose such lavish outdoor staterooms or similar inside ones with no portholes? Would the price be the only criterion? Thanks in advance!
 
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Bob Godfrey

Member
There wasn't any choice for the more lavish staterooms, George, as the 'inside' rooms were the cheap ones, relatively small and spartan. A passenger who could afford better might perhaps prefer an inside room if they were prone to 'mal de mer', as there would be slightly less roll nearer the centreline of the ship. Having no view of the sea might also help in that situation.
 
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Martin Williams

Member
Interesting to consider that no other item of furniture carries so many potent connotations as the chaise longue. On the one hand, we think of Victorian and Edwardian boudoirs, with languid ladies engulfed in miles of foam and froth, sipping tea, reading their letters and maybe receiving gentleman callers for an hour or two of amorous adventure.

On the other hand, the very same image also stands for the perceived passivity and enforced idleness of our great-great-grandmothers. Marganita Laski wrote a powerful and terrifying short story called 'The Victorian Chaise Longue' on just this theme...
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
the perceived passivity and enforced idleness of our great-great-grandmothers
Only if one's great-great-grandmother were rich enough to be able to indulge in such a lifestyle. My great-great-grandmothers on both sides wore themselves thin working very hard to keep their families going. However, yes, the image of a "fainting couch" does bring up mental images of frivolously frail lacy women needing to be revived with smelling salts.

Here's what we think is a "day bed' in the USA:

http://www.Daybeds.com

a very different beast indeed.
 
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Robert V. Magnus

Guest
Hi folks,
I have another question on my redecorating cabin B59 as my guest room. Now I'm wondering if anyone has any info on the satin comforters that I see on many of the beds. Does anyone know where they were made or where I could buy a replica? Thanks.
Bob
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
Frette of Italy (http://www.frette.com/) has claimed in the past to have supplied some linens to the Titanic. Likewise, William Ewart Liddell (http://www.liddell-linens.com/) also claimed to have supplied linens to Titanic. H.P. Mutters & Zoon, who designed B-59 in the first place, was also a supplier of certain fabrics to the ship, so it is also a possibility.
 
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Jason Schleisman

Member
And for an added touch of "authenticity", get yourself a real Vi-Spring mattress (http://www.vispring.co.uk/).

"The two gigantic White Star Liners Olympic and Titanic are being furnished throughout with these luxurious mattresses."
 
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