Jane Smith

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Aug 16, 2018
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No. Not the capstans. The objects in question I circled in red. I’m just wondering, if these objects are related to the steering gear, or related to something else

280D441A-4314-4A49-BCC7-CF05C9A00619.jpeg


BD1A0EC2-1B03-4F44-BEB6-50E044C3B72E.jpeg
 

Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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These were steel access hatches (You can see the hinges). They were on top of the two raised coamings with the three forward facing portholes.
The hatches were situated directly above the port and starboard Steering Engines. The potholes afforded natural light in the steering flat. The hatches provided means for repair and replacement of the steering engines. only one was in service at any one time.
 
Oct 28, 2000
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On D deck in the steering flat there are two capstans shown which were intended as emergency steering. These would work through tackles P&S which are also depicted running from the capstans to the steering quadrant. In theory, these tackles could also be man-hauled, but that would be a daunting process. Most steering engines had a "trick wheel" (origin unk.) that would allow using the regular steering system should there be a breakdown in the telemotor or its hydraulic pipes. Also, the wheel on the docking bridge would have had a means of connecting to the steering engine, possibly through a rod and crank arrangement. All very standard stuff in the early 20th century. There was some fear of telemotor, main steering engine, and/or quadrant gear failure.

-- David G. Brown

(PS to Mike Standart -- do you recall that odd tandem wheel setup on the ship in Toledo?)
 

Tim Gerard

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Feb 26, 2019
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I know the Titanic's rudder was powered by small steam engines in the very stern under the poop deck, using steam pressure to push the rudder over one way or the other. What my question is, how was that connected to the ship's wheel several hundred feet forward and up 3 or 4 decks at the bridge? And knowing that there were wheels in the open-air navigation bridge, the enclosed wheelhouse, and way back aft on the docking bridge, how was control switched between the three?

I apologize if this has already been discussed elsewhere. I saw a few threads from over the last 20 or so years that looked like they were getting close but ended up going off in different directions.
 

Tim Gerard

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Feb 26, 2019
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So a very large hydraulic system. I do understand fairly well how the system worked on ilder commercial jet aircraft, before fly-by-wire, where the control yoke in the cockpit was connected to the control surfaces through hydraulic lines, and I picture a significantly scaled up version for Olympic class ships. I wonder what the actual route of the lines was through the ship between the bridge and stern.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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So a very large hydraulic system. I do understand fairly well how the system worked on ilder commercial jet aircraft, before fly-by-wire, where the control yoke in the cockpit was connected to the control surfaces through hydraulic lines, and I picture a significantly scaled up version for Olympic class ships. I wonder what the actual route of the lines was through the ship between the bridge and stern.
B-rad posted this in another thread which you might have already seen. It describes some of the general routeing if I read it right. But to be honest I was getting lost a little trying to understand it. There were words in the article I don't think I've seen before. Have to look up a few.
 
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Tim Gerard

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Feb 26, 2019
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B-rad posted this in another thread which you might have already seen. It describes some of the general routeing if I read it right. But to be honest I was getting lost a little trying to understand it. There were words in the article I don't think I've seen before. Have to look up a few.
I did see that, you're right, it was a little difficult to understand. Very detailed though.
 

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