Stern Bridge

Dec 4, 2000
3,235
481
213
A binnacle is more than just a housing for the compass. It is also contains the compensating magnets and quadrantal spheres used to adjust deviation out of the card. There is really quite a bit of "stuff" inside--mostly magnets.

The word "binnacle" evolved from "bittacle," which goes back through the French to "habitaculum" in Latin, meaning a place of habitation. I guess it means the place where the compass lives. Originally, the bittacle housed a lamp and only later the compass.

Many of the binnacles of Titanic's era also had a small instrument below the compass. This was a clinometer, used to measure the heel or list of the deck.

-- David G. Brown
 

Erik Wood

Member
Apr 10, 2001
3,519
4
168
Leave it to Dave to tell us about the evolution of words. I am lucky if I can spell anything correctly. Very interesting though, very interesting.......bu t stu.. no I will be nice.

Erik
 
L

lisagay harrod

Guest
Joshua,

The TRMA site is great! Thanks so much for the tip. I have alot of homework to do, and it's the perfect place to start.

David,

Thank you as well...but what exactly is the "card".

I know this must seem remedial to you all, but I cling to the notion that there are no stupid questions.

Cheers,
Lisa
 
Dec 4, 2000
3,235
481
213
A card is one of a set of pieces of pasteboard, usually numbering 52...

Or, no, you mean a compass card. That is the circular disk on which the numbers, points and what-have-you are printed. On many dry compasses of 1912 vintage the "card" was actually white silk stretched in place by fine silk threads. This was to keep the mass of the card down so that relatively small magnetic forces would be detected. Today's liquid-filled compasses often have plastic "cards."

Now although "rope" when cut for a use is "line," the "lubber line" does not go to the "lubber's hole."

Actually, the "lubber line" is a fixed mark aligned with the ship's keel and against which the card is read. Some compasses have three lubber lines so that the helmsman can stand to either side and look straight at a line. (Use of auxiliary lubber lines requires some math--as the angular difference between the auxiliary and primary lubber line has to be taken into account. But, you probably knew that.)

"vast heaving and belay. That's enough for today.

-- David G. Brown
 
L

lisagay harrod

Guest
David,

It's back to glossary for moi!

Card makes sense after reading more on binnacle...cylinders /spheres used to counteract quadrant.

You're a piece of work...thanks.

Lisa
 

Erik Wood

Member
Apr 10, 2001
3,519
4
168
Dave,

Do you look this stuff up before you post it. You must be a vast chunk of knowledge.

Erik
 
Mar 3, 1998
2,745
4
0
<font color="#006600">You must be a vast chunk of knowledge.

I was going to pile on that, but then decided it would be better if I didn't. :)

Parks
 
L

lisagay harrod

Guest
David,

Back to the glossary I go again, and all I could come up with was a "bung starter": a heavy bat or stave used for striking a cask or barrel on either side of the bung in order to start or loosen the bung...

I'm not sure that I really need to to know exactly what a bung is. A little mystery is good for the girl. 'Sides, I think this is the part of the thread where I need to put my boots on...it's gettin' deep.

Cheers All,
Lisa
 
Dec 4, 2000
3,235
481
213
"Bungs" is wot you plug them screw holes with. Always cut yur bungs 'cross the grain from the same piece er wood, mindcha so the matches the grain in the plank. 'N sink 'em deep, else they'll be a-poppin' first times somebody claps a holystone to d'wood.

Anybody seen my makin' iron? I've got some corkin' to be doin'.

--The Ol' Wood Butcher
 
L

lisagay harrod

Guest
I'll have TWO of whatever the Capt'n is having!

Cheers,
Lisa
 
L

lisagay harrod

Guest
Dan,

That is the Smile of the Week! Almost better than Friday...thanks for sharing that. Kinda like a nautical Weeble...."Weebles wobble, but they don't go down!"

Cheers,
Lisa Harrod
 

Jane Smith

Member
Aug 16, 2018
80
2
18
I’m just curious about the fate of the docking bridge.

Did it get crushed when the poop deck folded back on itself? Or did it end up in the debris field?

The wheel and telegraphs from the docking bridge were recovered right? Or is that the bow I’m thinking of