Stewardesses

Gavin Bell

Member
Dec 12, 1999
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Out of all the surviving stewardesses the only ones that I know what became of them are: Violet Jessop, Emma Bliss, Evelyn Marsden James and Sarah Stap. Would anybody know what became of any of the others???

Thanks Cameron Bell
 
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Katie Sharrocks (Katie)

Guest
Why was there only 1 stewardess in 2nd class and a matron when there were lots of stewardess's in 1st class.First class ladies had maids with them to help them dress so why were there loads of stewardess's too? What was a marton for anyway?

These questions might sound stupid but I'm just a bit confused!
 
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Chris Dohany (Cdohany)

Guest
I believe there were others. For example, 2nd class passenger Selena Cook recalled Katherine Walsh as her stewardess during the sailing. Miss Walsh signed the ship's documents under the "1st class" victual section with most of the other stewardesses. I figure it's possible a small number were tallied off and assigned to 2nd class.
Chris
 
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Mark Bray

Guest
Did any of the stewardess that survived live in the US in later life or die here? If so, who and where. Important

Email me: MARK125689@aol.com

Sincerely,

Mark B.
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Dear Board members,

Is there any more information about the stewardesses onboard Titanic. What did they during the final hours of the Titanic. We know much more about some male crew-members then on the female crew-members. There were 23 female stewardesses onboard the Titanic.
For instant is there a possibility that we can find out which passengers they served?
And what became of them after the disaster?
From some stewardesses we know what become from them.
Miss Violet Jessop for instance, has her own memoirs. I read the book. Great book.

We know that three from the stewardesses died during the disaster.
Mrs. Lucy Violet Snape, born Lennard, a widow. Her husband died a year earlier, leaving her with a baby girl. What become from this child? (see book The Titanic Disaster - as reported in the British national press April - July 1912 page 103 and page 167) Mrs. Catherine Jane Wallis, born Moore, a widow. She had four children.
Miss Katherine Walsh was the third stewardess who died.
The other 20 female crew-members were rescued.
Two cashiers from the restaurant, two Turkish Bath stewardesses and 16 stewardesses.

Does anyone know the first name of Mrs. H. McLaren, born Allsop and of Mrs. A. Pritchard?

Does anyone know the maiden name of the other stewardesses?

That's enough for today I think.

Kind regards,

Hildo Thiel
 
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Andrew Rogers

Guest
G'day Hildo,
I only know a little about stewardess Evelyn Marsden.
I recently found her unmarked grave, here in Sydney and had a headstone erected on it, 62 years after she was buried there!
Most of the info we know about her is on her ET listing.

Bye for now,
Andrew
 
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Daniel Rosenshine

Guest
G'Day Andrew,

I saw you in the paper for winning that trip to see the Titanic. You were having a lecture that Sunday (way back then) but I missed it. I still have a copy of that article, funny I found it on the train.

Daniel.
 
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Nathan Heddle

Guest
I believe the final hours for most of the stewardesses was in the lifeboats. I think only one stewardess lost her life, all the other were put in life boats.

I don't know which ones, but if you go to the lifeboat section here, it tells you which boat they were in and what time that boat left, which gives a pretty good indication of what they were doing.

Besides that I think they were helping passengers with lifejackets and general showing to the boats, and what stewardesses do.

Hope this helps,

nathan
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Dear Hildo,
First class stewardess Mary Kezia Roberts was born at 55 Bulwer Street, Everton, Liverpool, on October 19th 1870. Her parents, both from Anglesey, Wales, were Hugh Humphreys and Elizabeth, formerly Williams. In 1896 Mary married David Roberts, and together they had five children. By 1912 the family were living in West Bridgford, Nottingham, where David was the principal at the West Bridgford Motor Company. Mary died in Epsom on January 2nd 1933. She was survived by her husband David.
Mrs Prichard was not Mrs Prichard at all according to her family. In 1912 Alice secured a job at sea in order to raise her young daughter. While at sea the child was cared for by Alice's sister. The family believed there was no Mr Prichard and that Prichard was an assumed name.
Hope these details help,
Regards
Craig
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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146
Dear Craig,

Thanks for your information about Mrs. Roberts and Miss Prichard.

It's very useful information. I am very interested what happened that night and the aftermath. And the personal accounts of the people.

There is much know about the passengers, but about many of the crew members we know not much.

Kind Regards,

Hildo.
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
511
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Dear Nathan,

Thanks for your message. Indeed the final hours of most of the stewardesses was in a lifeboat.

Mrs. Mabel Bennet and Mrs. H. McLaren left the ship with boat number 5, Miss Ruth Bowker and Miss Margaret E. Martin left the ship with boat 6. They were the first of the stewardesses who left the ship.

The others left the ship much later. 9 stewardesses left the ship with boat 11, 1 with boat 15 and 6 with boat 16.

One first class stewardess (Miss Walsh), one second class stewardess (Mrs. Snape) and the matron (Mrs. Wallis) left behind on Titanic and died.

Kind regards,

Hildo.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
5,342
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208
According to the Olympic's crew agreements (PRO Ref: BT 100/245), several of the women who would later serve on the Titanic joined the Olympic for her maiden voyage.

Katherine Gold (previous berth the Adriatic)
Mary Gregson (previous berth the Baltic)
Maud Slocombe (previous berth the Adriatic)
Bessie Lavington (previous berth the Adriatic)

Inger
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
511
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146
Hello Andrew,

Thanks for your message about Miss Evelyn Marsden.

I have read the book of Edward P. de Groot, Titanic. It's a Dutch book about Titanic. There I have read something about Miss Marsden and Miss Sloan.

He writes: May Sloan and Miss E. Marsden, two stewardesses from North Ireland,were worried, the one more, than the other. When the two women met Dr. Edward Simpson, he told them that the post was floating in the mailroom. Miss Marsden began to cry. Simpson took both stewardesses to his cabin and gave them a glass of whisky to become calm. Miss Sloan asked him: "Do you think that we need that?" Simpson thought so. He told the crying Miss Marsden to stop and that she must not be afraid. He asked Miss Sloan of she was afraid. She said, that she wasn't afraid.

We know that Miss Marsden was born in Australia, so she was not from North Ireland. Miss Sloan was from North Ireland.

Where they friends?

Miss Marsden left Titanic in lifeboat 16. Miss Sloan may have been in boat 16, but sometimes she is placed in another boat.

kind regards,

Hildo.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Dear Hildo,
Regarding Miss Sloan and Miss Marsden, and their lifeboats. I understand that Miss Sloan delayed her departure from the Titanic, having seen Miss Marsden away in number 16. I'm at work at the moment, so I don't have my notes handy. I'll check tonight and let you know.
Regards
Craig
 
Apr 25, 2001
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Dear everybody re Miss Sloan and Miss Marsden; Miss Marsden escaped in boat 16 without a doubt, whereas Miss Sloan describes the incidents occurring in and near boat No 12, including the Second Officer being in charge of her boat and the picking up of people from the overturned collapsible.

Best regards,

Peter

PS Craig : I don't have your e-mail address, and would be delighted to hear from you
My e-mail address is: hpek@rocketmail.com
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Dear Hildo,
Have just checked my notes on Miss Sloan. She talks about standing on the boat deck watching the activity. She saw Evelyn Marsden into boat no.16, but remained behind. In one account she tells of trying to persuade another woman to enter a lifeboat, which delayed her own departure. As Peter says it is likely that Mary left in boat 12, and has said that Thomas Andrews insisted she leave.
Regards
Craig
 
E

Edmund Turner

Guest
The nine stewardesses who left in boat 11 must of been standing around together on deck debating wether it was there duty to get it to a lifeboat or, assist with helping the passengers, when they were ushered in by a member of crew, thats what I think happened.
Edmund
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
511
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146
Dear Craig and Peter,

If Miss Sloan left Titanic with boat 12 and Miss Marsden with boat 16, than must boat 16 left the Titanic before boat 12.

And indeed Miss Sloan left Titanic after Thomas Andrews insisted that she stepped in a lifeboat.

It seems that Miss Sloan was the last stewardess to leave Titanic.

Kind regards,

Hildo.
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
511
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146
Dear boardmembers,

In the book "Titanic voices, memories from the fateful voyage, by Donald Hyslop, Alastair Forsyth and Sheila Jemima are some photos with the stewardesses. A group-photo taken in Plymouth on page 244 and one of two stewardesses on page 222. On the photo at page 244 are 13 stewardesses. One is stewardess Annie Robinson, the one in the middle at the back with veil. Stewardess Jessop is the third from left. Who are the others? And who are the two stewardesses on page 222?

Kind Regards,

Hildo.