Stockholm in Fog


Sep 22, 2003
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Coatesville, PA
there have been numerous arguments about whether or not stockholm was in fog in the moments leading up to the collision w/ the Andrea Doria. some claim the ship was in fog simply because the looks out on stockholm could only see a mile or a head of themselves, when normal range was 15 - 20 miles. none of crew members which were on the bridge during this 12 - 15 min time reported fog, all said it was a good clear night. is it than possible that stockholm was simply approaching a fog bank while was a couple miles away?

also many say stockholm was going too fast. the rules of the road for ships approaching fog basically says that a vessel when in fog should proceed at a moderate speed so that it will be able to stop within half the distance of distance that can be seen. for example: a vessel should only able to see 1000 feet ahead should proceed at a speed where it can stop at 500 ft of that distance. for stockholm this represented no problem as she had a 100% backing and stopping power as she was fitted w/ Diesel Engines. of course take in mind though that the distances were greater than what was given in my example. the case of backing and stopping power was different for the Andrea Doria which only had 30% w/ her steam turbines, and it can be said that if she did try to reverse her engines or stop, she would have split stockholm in two and sent her to the bottom.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Jesse, for a better understanding of the events in question, you might want to go to The Andria Doria Website. It might help you to know that trained merchent marine officers frequently refer to this event sarcastically as histories first radar assisted collision. A careful reading of the website will help you better understand why.
 
Sep 22, 2003
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Coatesville, PA
Michael

Thank you for sharing this info w/ me, though that sight is on my favorites and already visit alot. besides that ive read the following the books relating to the disaster

Ile De France
Captain of the Ile
Collision Course
Saved!
Desperate hours
Out of the Fog

I have also borrowed Gary Gentile's book from the library quite a number of times.

none of these books give concrete evidence that stockholm was or wasnt in fog at any time in the moments leading up to the collision, but i do i find carstens side more likely in the case of the fog, as the other two men on the bridge w/ him didnt report fog to anyone at before, during, or after the collision, and carstens himself said there was no fog.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Chances are that both of them are right too. This might sound a little odd but stop and think about it a spell. Fog can be and often is very patchy so it's entirely possible that both vessels could be sailing in the clear one minute only to find one or the other...or both...obscured by fog a minute later. The Atlantic shipping lanes in particular are especially notorious for this.

I've seen it happen often enough during my career. A few erroneous assumptions here, a bad decision taken at the wrong moment there...that's all it takes to spoil your day at sea.
 
May 3, 2002
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Wellington, New Zealand
The worst possible scenario as the field of play is in flux. Patchy fog would need both radar and lookout observation. the value of a good set of eyes and binoculars used properly should not be discounted, even today.

Martin
 
Sep 22, 2003
571
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Coatesville, PA
My opinion is Stockholm was not in fog at any time during that night before the collision as no look outs, officers, or other crew members aboard her reported fog. it is therefore my belief that Andrea Doria was coming out of fog when the two ships met and Stockholm was on the edge of a fog bank, as Stockholm did have weather reports telling her about this ahead of her, she should have started sounding her fog horn when she was within 20 miles distance of it, as that is the normal sight range for look outs on clear nights.
 

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