Stokehold Plates

Robby House

Member
Jun 9, 2016
64
10
18
47
Kathleen, GA
Hello all,

I'm going to ask a question that will probably cause a lot of eyes to roll back in their heads regarding Titanic's "stokehold plates." I'm not sure why, but a glossary definition I found somewhere a while back described these plates in such a way that they more or less formed an elevated platform in front of each boiler ostensibly to aid the stoker in his stoking/ash removal duties. I think from that I took it to mean it was a very localized rise only found directly in front of each boiler above the Tank Top level, but that it did not extend forward-aft-port-starboard to form a complete, solid or nearly unbroken flooring above the Tank Top. I've surprisingly not been able to find the sort of absolute, definitive answer I seek from online research. The drawing I've included with my question is one of the rare illustrations that show what I imagine to be a wall to wall stokehold plate configuration approximately 2 ' above the Tank Top. Now that I've become more familiar with the ship's boiler rooms I just want to be 100% sure I understand, so I'll ask:

Did the stokehold plates in Boiler Rooms 1-6 essentially form solid flooring approximately 2 feet above the ship's Tank Top that spanned the entire compartment? [See Drawing]

Thanks,

Robby House
Stokehold Plates.PNG
 
Last edited:

Robby House

Member
Jun 9, 2016
64
10
18
47
Kathleen, GA
Looks like I didn't look hard enough! I see that the plans provided on this site seem to indicate what I've come to assume was indeed a stokehold plate "floor" above the Tank Top.

LOL! Anyway...I guess through this posting there will be no doubt once I get a few responses.

Thanks,

Robby

Stokehold Plates Image 2.PNG