Storage hold coverings


JTDillon

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Apr 3, 2020
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Hello everyone...

Hope youve all had a wonderful Christmas & will have a great New Year!

Lets say you have an eagles eye view of the Titanic... youre looking straight down onto Titanics bow. There are three openings that lead to the storage holds; one on the forecastle and two on the lower area of the bow. I clearly dont know the technical/proper names for these areas or parts, forgive me.

From what I have read these were covered in some kind of tarp during voyages, is this correct?
What im trying to figure out is how these openings would have impacted the flooding. When the external waterline reached these openings, would the covering (whatever it was made out of & however it was secured) be enough to prevent the water from making its way in?

A big variable to consider would be the external vs internal waterlines... If the internal waterline hadnt gotten as high as the hatch there would be nothing to support the weight of the external water on top of it (does this make sense?), if this happened the weight of the water could potentially cause the hatch cover to "collapse" which would impact the flooding drastically.
Do we have any idea of the flooding after the hatches were submerged? Did the rate of flooding increase drastically?

I hope im making sense here...
 
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Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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Hello everyone...

Hope youve all had a wonderful Christmas & will have a great New Year!

Lets say you have an eagles eye view of the Titanic... youre looking straight down onto Titanics bow. There are three openings that lead to the storage holds; one on the forecastle and two on the lower area of the bow. I clearly dont know the technical/proper names for these areas or parts, forgive me.

From what I have read these were covered in some kind of tarp during voyages, is this correct?
What im trying to figure out is how these openings would have impacted the flooding. When the external waterline reached these openings, would the covering (whatever it was made out of & however it was secured) be enough to prevent the water from making its way in?

A big variable to consider would be the external vs internal waterlines... If the internal waterline hadnt gotten as high as the hatch there would be nothing to support the weight of the external water on top of it (does this make sense?), if this happened the weight of the water could potentially cause the hatch cover to "collapse" which would impact the flooding drastically.
Do we have any idea of the flooding after the hatches were submerged? Did the rate of flooding increase drastically?

I hope im making sense here...
hey! interesting theory. weren't they called bunker hatches? the hatch coamings would've delayed this. And didn't the No. 1 hatch have a proper top/cover? Its still there, 100 or so feet infront of the bow
 

JTDillon

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Apr 3, 2020
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hey! interesting theory. weren't they called bunker hatches? the hatch coamings would've delayed this. And didn't the No. 1 hatch have a proper top/cover? Its still there, 100 or so feet infront of the bow

I didnt really have a specific theory, I was kinda trying to come up with one haha :p
IDK what they were called, but bunker hatches sounds good to me! How much do you think the hatches wouldve delayed the water? Regardless you think water wouldve made its way into the hatch which wouldve sped up the flooding?
I wonder how good the seals were... I bet the number 1 "proper" cover did a good job of keeping water out.
 
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Jim Currie

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The fore peak hatch was steel and as Cam points out it , it seems that upward resistance pressured due to the bow hitting the sea bed, blew it off.
As for the coverings for cargo holds? - These consisted of evenly spaced, portable steel beams which spanned the hatch opening. On top of and between hese, were laid a portable "deck" of hatch boards of white pine abou 8 ft. long-18" wide and 3" thick bound a each end with galvanised steel bands. On top of th hatch boards, making the opening watertight, were laid, a "sandwich" of three canvas tarpaulins. Thereafter, the whole kit and caboodle was secured by lengths of steel flat bar at he sides, held securely in place by wooden wedges driven between the flatbar and special steel brackets. Wedges were driven from forward to aft so that shipped heavy seas would not dislodge them.
 
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