Stresses involved during the break-up


Oliver K

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I have recently been studying sheer and tensile stress for this very reason, as well as some other fields of civil and mechanical engineering, the study will go into the sequence of events, how the break-up likely occured, and factors that may have contributed.

Just wondering if anyone is interested?


An excerpt from the first chapter
A ships hull has been before described as being like a box girder, itself resisting torsion for the strakes that run upon both sides of the hull, but is still none the less subjected to moving forces from its own dead weight, the live load of its cargo and passengers, as well as severe weather, ships and bridges are similar in the way of the same problem, that is, an object with a lot of dead load, and changing live load must be able to withstand such a thing without collapse, shear stress usually presents itself as bending, no matter how little or big, it is a representation of an area of a structure which can not support its own dead or live load, and thus the force is distributed on that area, it is important to realize the effect of this is weight, as it is the pull of gravity, though stress of a structure is often measured in Pascals we shall use standard S.I units of measurement of weight for the sake of simplicity.
 
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Bob_Read

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Have you studied the numerous studies and simulations which have already been produced? Is there something that all of them have missed? I can say for myself that by reading your sample paragraph that If I had to wade through a physics and mechanical engineering jargon filled treatise, I wouldn’t.
 
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Mar 22, 2003
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Speaking as a technical person myself, if the above is a sample, then I'm afraid that there are very few people who would be willing to read beyond the first paragraph. My question is essentially the same as Bob's. How does this work differ from previous works, and why should anyone be interested?
 
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Oliver K

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First of all, i do understand the skepticism, not everyone appreciates verbiage and its the butt of jokes for many, but there are no other words to use to describe it in detail, you could easily say "Stress on the engine room bulkhead caused the ship to break in-half" but there are different kinds of stress, tensile and shear, and what that stress did, and where it orginated, all be taken into account.

I have watched many simulations before, some of which focus on conspiracy theories surrounding the steel, all i can say is that any given material can tear if the maximum stress is exceeded.

It differs from previous works in that it is my theory and opinion on what happened, many an enthusiast has they're own opinion on what happened and where it originated.

If anyone it's the start of me becoming not only an enthusiast but also an author of the RMS Titanic, i hope to own a copy of TTSM one day.

Hope that helps!
 
Mar 22, 2003
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OK Oliver, I understand what you want to do. My only suggestion is that you keep in mind the readability of what you put down, and try to understand who your audience is. In your first post you asked if anyone is interested and you gave a sampling from your first chapter. You saw the reaction of Bob Read and me. So I guess the ball is back in your court to judge interest. Just a little quote from one of my idols:
"If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough." - Albert Einstein
 
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Arun Vajpey

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As per Sam Halpern's Centennial Reappraisal book (as I have understood it):
  • At about 02:15 am the Titanic's bow was down by about 10 degrees and the water started to come over the wheelhouse. The rate of trim (the dip of the bow) increased rapidly from that point.
  • About a minute or two later ie somewhere close to 02:17 am, the Titanic lost its longitudinal stability and gave a sudden forward and downward lurch that displaced a large volume of water stern-wards in the form of a 'wave'.
My question is whether the stress on the keel caused by that sudden lurching movement and resultant loss of buoyancy act as the proverbial last straw that led to the break-up?
 
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As per Sam Halpern's Centennial Reappraisal book (as I have understood it):
  • At about 02:15 am the Titanic's bow was down by about 10 degrees and the water started to come over the wheelhouse. The rate of trim (the dip of the bow) increased rapidly from that point.
  • About a minute or two later ie somewhere close to 02:17 am, the Titanic lost its longitudinal stability and gave a sudden forward and downward lurch that displaced a large volume of water stern-wards in the form of a 'wave'.
My question is whether the stress on the keel caused by that sudden lurching movement and resultant loss of buoyancy act as the proverbial last straw that led to the break-up?
Personally I think the sudden lurching movement and resultant loss of buoyancy you are referring to might have not caused the break-up, but over all it was just the stress on the ship as it rose to a higher angle, the sudden lurching movement maybe just the Ship easing it's port list, or returning to a even keel as which survivors reported that the ship looked like it rose, and some that were on the bridge at 2:15AM saw the water run up, I think it's when the water ran up as the ship plunged forward when at the same time it returned to an even keel.

personally this is how i think the break-up went. (this is a theory I made)

Break-Up Theory Video
 
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Kyle Naber

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Personally I think the sudden lurching movement and resultant loss of buoyancy you are referring to might have not caused the break-up, but over all it was just the stress on the ship as it rose to a higher angle, the sudden lurching movement maybe just the Ship easing it's port list, or returning to a even keel as which survivors reported that the ship looked like it rose, and some that were on the bridge at 2:15AM saw the water run up, I think it's when the water ran up as the ship plunged forward when at the same time it returned to an even keel.

personally this is how i think the break-up went. (this is a theory I made)

Break-Up Theory Video

I feel as if the righting of the port list, the “rising” of the deck, and the lurch down all happened together as you mention. It was also described that four “explosions” were heard deep within the ship as this occurred (Lightoller’s theory on all of this was a failing bulkhead).
 
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James B

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My question is whether the stress on the keel caused by that sudden lurching movement and resultant loss of buoyancy act as the proverbial last straw that led to the break-up?
Could be, the huge bm and sf must have caused acrack at that point.

Ps, not related (or mybe it is), in general there are 2 diffrent coditions when discussing about stresses, port/calm water condition and sea/dynamic condition. The max allowed limits are higher in calm water.
 

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