Stuart Collett

  • Thread starter Anne Collett Cornell
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Randy Bryan Bigham

Member
RE: his hand

I assume it is a glove. That he would bother wearing just the one (as its mate is no where to be seen)may show his mental strain - or an early attempt at setting a fad a la Michael Jackson.
Happy
Unless of course it is a hand injury he's concealing, as has been suggested. I wouldn't know. Geoff or Phil being the experts will know better.

Personally I never heard of Stuart Colett before but was so struck by his rather sad, yet elegant, looks that I thought I'd share the images. I'm guessing Collett's clothes are the ones he wore off Titanic. To me the man looks disoriented or nervous.

The pictures are in the LOC and copies may be purchased for $68 + shipping. They claim no ownership but do request acknowledgement should the shots be reproduced in print. I don't know if negatives exist but at least these original prints do.


(Message edited by rbigham on March 24, 2002)
 
Tracy Smith

Tracy Smith

Member
Perhaps he lost the other glove during the sinking. He probably continued to wear the remaining glove because he was cold, as is witnessed in the first picture by him sticking his ungloved hand into his jacket.
 
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Chris Dohany

Member
It appears to me as if the other glove is in his left hand, you can see it hanging down beside the paper he's holding (more clearly in the first picture).
 
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Andrew Maheux

Member
Mabee He is wearing one glove because he is useing his other hand for something, like mabee writing. I know I cant write with gloves on. Or mabee he doesnt want to get his left hand full of ink from the newspaper? Just some suggestions.

There is moving footage of him in the video Titanic Survivors at the very end and he is also holding newspapers.

Andrew Maheux
 
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David M. Collett

Guest
I am interested in obtaining any biographical information on Sidney. I believe he was a divinity student who survived thanks to lifeboat 9.Has anyone seen any research on him?
thanks,
Dave Collett
 
Phillip Gowan

Phillip Gowan

RIP
David,
Sidney Collett was indeed rescued and lived until May 8, 1941. He had been a divinity student as you assert and returned to England afterwards where he was known as an unusually pious Christian man. He married, had two daughters and a son, and was extremely close to his sons-in-law. His Last Will and Testament begins in this way:

"I commit my soul to the Lord Jesus Christ, my God and Saviour Whose precious blood and righteousness are my only hope in life and death for time and eternity. I desire to record my unshaken faith in the Divine inspiration of God's holy word in every part from beginning to end and humbly and gratefully acknowledge the goodness and mercy of the Lord which have followed me all the days of my life in spite of my great unworthiness and my many failures and shortcomings and relying upon His faithful word I believe that when I depart from this life I shall through grace be with Christ which is far better."

A very extraordinary man--one of my favorite Titanic personalities and someone I would very much have liked to have known.

Regards,
Phil
 
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Randy Bryan Bigham

Member
I too have liked Collett since seeing those great press photos of him on Carpathia. He looks so tired and shaken, you can't help but feel sorry for him. It was also fun picking him out in the newsreel footage taken on Carpathia's arrival in NY.
 
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Arne Mjåland

Member
Here is the obituary about Sidnes Collett exactly as it appeared in The Times May 10 1941:
DEATHS
COLLETT - On May 8 1941, SIDNEY COLLETT beloved husband of Ruth Collett passed peacefully away. Memorial service at Talbot Tabernacle, Baywater May 13, at 2.30. Interment Hendon Cementery at 3.30. (Foreign papers, please copy.)
 
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Robert DiMaria

Guest
i was listening to Mrs Bertha Watts interview on the Titanic Historical Society tape and she said that Mr. Collett was in her lifeboat and complained the whole night about losing his sermons on the Titanic. She also said that one lady was so upset about his complaints "that she just flew at him and said that she would pay him for his sermons if it meant that her husband and son were saved." Does anyone have any other information about this? Was Mrs. Watt right?

THanks

Rob
 
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David M. Collett

Guest
Thanks to all who responded. I now have a starting place for research.Any additional info postings will be helpful and appreciated.
Rev. Dave Collett
 
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Arne Mjåland

Member
In Auburn Dayly Advertisere, April 23 1912 there was a long article about Sidney Collett.
I received copy of the article from the public library in Auburn, N.Y., U.S.A.
I bring a little from the article:

COLLETTS OWN STORY
Port Byron survivor of Titanic wreck
First Boats carried men.
Several boats had been lowered full of men, among them President Ismay. The officers were just lowering boat no. 9, the third from the last to be put off. The ladies stepped in , then the officer with drawn revolver said to me:
"Well, what of you, where are you going?" I replied that I have these young ladies in my chargeand felt it my duty to take care of them. "Get in", said the officer and a moment later the boat was lowered.

Fright for those in small boats.

After we had floated for an hour or more there came our first real scare for our own safety, All about us we could see the backs of monster fish, their shiny skins or scales glimmering grew in the moonlight. They were terrible looking monsters and we feared that they would swim under our boats and upset them, but they did not. It was a time when we were close to our Maker. I prayed constantly from the time our boat struck the iceberg intil I reached Neew York. Never was there a wireless message that went so quickly and straight as my prayers to the throne of God. Never will I forget those horrible hours after the sinking of the ship, It wass maddening. Minutes seemed like hours and hours like days.
Are there any accounts from other survivors about terrible monster fishes under the lifeboats?



F

P
 
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Colleen Collier

Member
Terrible sea monsters overturning the boats? That is a new one, for me at least. I have heard of sailors' stories told about sea monsters but never along with Titanic.hmmmm...
 
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George Behe

Member
Hi, Colleen!

> I have heard of sailors'stories told about sea >monsters but never along with Titanic.hmmmm...

A case might be made for Arthur Rostron's sighting of a marine longneck that passed close to his vessel (a sighting which, if I recall correctly, occurred in Rostron's 'pre-captain days.')

All my best,

George
 
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