Study of the deterioration of the Titanic Wreck


Mark Draper

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Nov 9, 2004
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I read that.
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I emailed them about if any photos of the stern section, and other areas of the wreck where significant decay took place will be posted.
 
Sep 29, 2005
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The Titanic is proving to be a literal treasure-trove for scientific study of the deep ocean floor. Because there are only five submersibles in the world that can visit the extreme depths of 12,600 feet, where Titanic resides, every visit to the ship have proven to be of tremendous value to the scientific community. Each dive to the Titanic has the potential to discover a new species of plant or animal life - and in most cases, many new lifeforms has been found and cataloged for further study. The area surrounding Titanic can now be referred to as a natural field laboratory for the study of deep ocean ecosystems. There are very few scientific works about Titanic that have been released to the general public; however, in the future we will be seeing more scientific data presented that will provide a keen insight into the local environment surrounding the ship. By further understanding this in-situ environment, we can provide the associated research that could aid in the preservation of the Titanic. Obviously, the difficulty of conducting scientific studies at this depth limits the number and types of comprehensive examination that can be performed on the wreck site of Titanic.

Abstract from paper presented at global OCEANS 2005 Conference in Washington, DC on September 20th, 2005 :

Comparative Photometric Analysis of Structural Degradation on the Bow of RMS Titanic

Abstract - A comparative, qualitative photometric survey of RMS Titanic was undertaken to subjectively analyze the condition of the structural integrity of the ship since her discovery in 1985 to the present. The goal of this study is to visually observe the rate of degradation of the condition of the bow section of the ship. Photographs taken from previous expeditions commencing from 1986 to the present were analyzed and compared to monitor the structural decay of the hull and superstructure over the course of time. The observations of this subjective analysis reveal a rapid decomposition of many areas throughout the bow of Titanic. Many decks have collapsing walls, rotted out structure, and vibrant growths of rusticle development. There is a significant widening of the bow expansion joint over time that is clearly evident in this part of the ship. Additionally, there is a very huge tear in the starboard plate aft of the number one davit that is expanding with each passing year. The results of this analysis show that the bow of RMS Titanic has been losing its structural integrity at a rapid rate and she is in danger of total collapse.

On this nautical website at http://nauticalresearch.com , I have placed the scientific research paper and its associated PowerPoint presentation that was given at this past week’s Oceans 2005 conference in Washington, DC. This paper is part of a preliminary analysis on the gross morphological structural integrity changes due to natural processes on the bow of RMS Titanic. This paper is not meant to be an all-inclusive summary of the microbial effects on the ship, as the wonderful scientists, Roy Cullimore and Lori Johnston, are the experts in this field and would be in the best position to discuss their groundbreaking work. While looking at these downloads, please browse through this highly graphic and informative nautical website. Throughout this site, I have placed copyrighted pictures my work down on Titanic, as well as many other famous wreck sites that I dive and conduct research.

Finally, the preferred method for retrieving this information can be found by going to the main homepage first and then selecting Updated News from the left-hand column. The presentation links can be found under the September 26, 2005 submission. As mentioned on an earlier blog (see Source below), I will be revamping the main nautical website to provide an Educational section that will include all our original articles, science, photos and video from various well-known and famous shipwrecks.

SPECIAL NOTE : I have released my exclusive 2005 RMS Titanic Scientific Research Expedition series of stunning photographs on the Corporate website. The first series is a never-before-seen complete Wellin davit mechanism with its double rocker arm that was found in the stern section of the ship. There has never been reports of a finding of a complete davit mechanism ever found on Titanic and this photo shows that this davit mechanism is in great shape!

SOURCE: http://shipwreck.blogs.com September 21st & 26th, 2005
 

Mark Draper

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Are there any photos from your previous expedition to Titanic of the stern section's now collapsed superstructure decks? I mean most photos show the fantail or the engines of the stern section. I'm curious about the rest of the stern.
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The davits your report mentions lie along the port side of the stern, right next to the peeled out shell plating of the middle portion of the stern.

I also noticed a small mistake too, the crack found along the forward well deck has been there, created from the impact on the bottom when Titanic slammed into the ocean floor.
 
Sep 29, 2005
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Mark,

We took some good video of the stern section in 2003 but even better footage in 2005. Because of the numerous hours it takes to analyze the details of this footage, we have not had the opportunity to thoroughly and scientifically analyze this footage. We ask for your patience as Titanic is one of many underwater projects that we undertook during the summer of 2005.

As for the crack along the forward well-deck, this isn't a mistake in that the crack has been recently undergoing a widening effect (fissure)as the ship settles. We have done a preliminary analysis on this section ( but will need further quantification) that this gap has widened and the tear is getting bigger. Rusticle formation on the initial break is quite significant (clearly supports evidence on your thoughts about its original genesis)whereas the newer portions are devoid of this dense growth. This suggests that this area is going through a dynamic change and this section is deteriorating. Since this area lies in close proximation to the huge starboard side hull breech, it makes perfect sense that the structural integrity of this entire section is being compromised. Many thanks for your very intelligent discussion and your email! We will be working very hard on the new video this fall/winter and will contact you off-line regarding the stern information. There is no doubt that this section looks like it went through a food-processor.
 
Oct 15, 2007
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David, Actually the whole ship looks like it went through a food processor. Sad I might add!! I wish James Cameron could send Jake and Elwood back into the ship to see if we can get much more images.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Shannon, I don't think you can look forward to any sort of response from David Bright unless you have a means of communication even more advanced then the internet. He lost his life last year following a dive on the Andrea Doria.

Regretably, it appears that the link in his profile goes to a website which is no longer active.
 

Scott Newman

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Jun 16, 2004
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Tacky as it may seem, and not to carry this thread in another direction...but would it make sense to update David Bright's profile accordingly? Perhaps as a "in memory of..." stating his accomplishments and contributions to ET? Just a thought.

As for Jake and Elwood, they have been "put to pasture" as they say. I believe there are updated versions of the bots that were seen in the '05 expedition, but Jim is currently occupied with a movie or two...
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Dec 3, 2000
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quote:

but would it make sense to update David Bright's profile accordingly?
I don't see why we should. It's fine the way it is and his profile is in memory to him, as it already lists his accomplishments. Plus, we are not in the business of updating member's profiles.​
 
Dec 2, 2000
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A notation might be appropriate. I don't know if we can do it, but the problem here is that a lot of people don't really think to check out profiles anyway. I agree with Jason though: The profile as it stands is a fitting memorial to the man. He had quite the passion for his craft.
 

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