Such little remembrance


titan

Member
Sep 13, 2001
31
0
156
Mount Gambier Australia
hi all,

as of now the Titanic has been sitting on the ocean bed for one hundred and three years and twenty two days and yet last April 14th/15th not a single word was mentioned about it. is the world getting bored or is the most famous ship wreck of all just getting to be old news, i think that there should be at least something to commemorate the passing years.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
1,194
13
233
Hi Titan,

While I agree with you, I think it was as we feared and that interest peaked on the 100th anniversary and now there are other things which have the attention of the world. Sad, but that's the way it goes sometimes - I think interest will rise again into the future.

Cheers,
Adam.
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
447
67
133
USA
Consider the participation on this forum, which seems to have been declining except for us die-hards. To the general public, the Titanic simply doesn't warrant an annual anniversary recognition. This week, it's the 70th anniversary of the end of WW2 in Europe. Next week, it could be something else that might prompt historical TV documentaries or newspaper articles. Titanic's stock, as far as captivating public interest, is down.
 
Apr 18, 2014
80
2
58
Czech Republic
I returned from Ireland recently, and I was there in April, which is the month of her foundering. I saw the Memorial Garden in Belfast, and also saw Titanic Belfast and the Docks.. I welled up... You are right, the legacy of the story should live on and on, not only during big anniversaries. And Doug, Titanic's stock is indeed down these days. I am also interested into general maritime history, and truth be told, almost no attention was given in my country to centenary of sinking of Lusitania, which was this year... Maybe the Titanic story will catch interest of the public as soon as Titanic II ship is announced to be continued on working, but that is unlikely to happen, for I doubt the Titanic II project will ever cease being halted. Imo Titanic II ship,even a very thought of it, is disrespectful towards the victims/survivors of her namesake and to the descendants of theirs.
 

Doug Criner

Member
Dec 2, 2009
447
67
133
USA
For decades, "Titanic" became just a figure of speech - referring, for example, to "futility" being like rearranging the deck chairs on Titanic. Then, with the discovery of the wreck, traveling displays of debris, the movie, and culminating in the 100th anniversary, pubic interest soared. It's difficult to think of another blockbuster event that would revive the public interest.
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
6,335
1,185
323
NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
I first heard of Titanic from my aunt who was 20 years old when the accident happened. She related the story to me when I first decided to follow a sea-going career. That was just after WW2. Thereafter, from the age 15 years and for most of the following 55 years, I was at sea or associated with the sea and all things maritime. Never once during all that time, do I recall ever hearing the name Titanic mentioned. It is only since I joined this site and another similar one that the name Titanic has had any meaning for me at all.

For the most part, those who follow the story and actively take part in discussions are relatively small in number compared to the followers of football teams pop stars, or film and TV. These interests are constantly changing so interest in change is constantly being renewed. I think you'll find that those of us who keep plugging away at Titanic and associated history, mostly disagree with each other on specifics. Thus, until proof- positive of something is produced.. the search for truth will continue.

Jim C
 
Nov 13, 2014
337
40
93
Belgium
Earlier today, I was thinking about how to improve my book when something dawned to me... There hasn't been a movie made of the Titanic which depicts the sinking in real-time.
Imagine it: a 2h 40min long movie, starting when Fred Fleet rings the bell and ending when the sea closes over the Titanic. All events will be as historically correct as possible, placed on the correct moment of the sinking. With minimal extra dramatization, because I believe the truth is dramatic enough.
Maybe this concept is nuts, but it would be a unique thing. It could revive the general interest in the Titan of the White Star Line.
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,382
1,655
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
It has been reported that Robert Ballard one time allegedly said: "The ship sunk. Get over it!" He may have had a point. But as Jim intimated, the remaining interest these days seem to be among those who are looking into specific areas that do not have universally accepted answers. Some areas that come to mind are:

1. Why on a perfectly clear night with a perfectly calm sea the pride of the White Star Line somehow managed to strike an iceberg with seemingly little advanced warning.
2. Why a collision that was described as a glancing blow managed to result in the foundering of a vessel described as being practically unsinkable.
3. Why a vessel that was designed to stand up against the worst conditions that the North Atlantic had to offer somehow managed to break in two on the surface of the ocean before disappearing from sight.
4. Why the discovery of the wreck happened to be about 13 miles east of her reported distress position.
5. Why there has been no agreement in the historical record as to the exact time the ship struck the iceberg or the exact time that she disappeared beneath the surface of the Atlantic.
6. What exact actions were taken as soon as the iceberg was spotted.
7. Who went into what lifeboat and when.
8. And why a small tramp steamer to the northward that witnessed Titanic’s distress socket signals being sent up for almost an hour remained stopped all night while other far away vessels were racing to the rescue.
 

Adam Went

Member
Apr 28, 2003
1,194
13
233
I think as well that the passage of time has taken its toll in that there are no longer any living survivors and probably nobody alive who could even have a vague memory of Titanic before she sank. At least with other events like wars, they take on a far more global significance and there are more people still around who can relate first hand experiences, certainly of more recent conflicts such as World War II and Vietnam.

Interest has been sparked and re-sparked in Titanic by discovery of the wreck, expeditions to it, anniversaries, etc but now all of those major milestones have been passed, it is indeed difficult to see what might be next. The centenary of Lusitania passed by here virtually without a whisper. But I remain convinced that as long as there is a core group of enthusiasts to keep investigating and debating different aspects of the story, it will come full circle and younger generations will become interested again.

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Oct 28, 2000
3,242
543
388
The "word of hand" mentioned by Michael McGuffin was a message written by Captain Smith and carried by quartermaster Olliver directly to Chief Engineer Bell. White Star Line provided special pads of paper for this purpose. Although he carried the folded paper, Olliver denied looking at the contents. With the deaths of both Smith and Bell all human knowledge was lost. Still, a bit of digging through the IMM/White Star Line rule book gives us a probable answer. At the time of that message it was known that Titanic had struck an iceberg and was taking on water. In that condition it would likely become necessary for the Chief Engineer to fill, pump, or transfer ballast water in the tanks of the double bottom. The rule book was specific about the Commander's role in work of this sort:

"25. Ballast Tanks.--The ballast tanks are never to be filled or pumped out at sea or in port except by the express instructions or permission in writing of the Commander..."

Shifting ballast was and remains a first-line measure of damage control. Even so, under company regulations Chief Bell required written permission from Captain Smith to do so. The Captain could not have used the ship's interior telephone to give oral permission. He had to write it down and send it on paper to Bell. "Word of hand" seems quaint to us today, but in 1912 many ships still lacked internal telephones. The importance of Rule 25 grows out of maintaining the stability of a damaged vessel. Shifting, discharging, or adding ballast water improperly could cause a damaged vessel to capsize.

Of course nobody knows for certain what the Captain wrote. More likely the message containd the required written permission to shift Titanic's ballast water. A less likely but still possible message would have been an instruction to send as many stokers and trimmers on deck as possible.
Social messages like "happy birthday" can probably be ruled out.

-- David G. Brown
 

Jim Currie

Member
Apr 16, 2008
6,335
1,185
323
NewtonMearns, Glasgow, Scotland.
Hello David.

Here's another possible reason for the note:

"The noise of escaping steam directly over our cabin caused a deal of trouble to Mr. Phillips in reading the replies to our distress call, and this I also reported to Capt. Smith, who by some means managed to get it abated."


The above is an extract from a letter sent by Junior Wireless Operator Bride to New York Marconi traffic manager W. R. Cross dated April 27

Perhaps the little note said "Sparks unable to hear wireless communications due to escaping steam...please stop venting steam as soon as possible"

Jim C.
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,382
1,655
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
That note was handed to Olliver after he returned from his first errand to find the carpenter. That was way before Phillips and Bride got involved. About that time the ship had taken on 5° list and the full extent of damage was not yet known. I think David may be right on this one.
 
Nov 13, 2014
337
40
93
Belgium
It may be true that the note was sent before Phillips started sending CQD signals, but he wasn't idle at the moment of the note.

Walter Lord's A Night To Remember says that Bride woke up at 11:55 P.M, 15 minutes after the collision. Phillips told him he was just finished sending the private messages to Cape Race. Phillips had been doing that all day, even after the moment of impact.

If we know for sure that the note was sent after 11:55 P.M. and before 12:15 A.M, at the moments Phillips & Bride were idle, we can erase Jim's suggestion. If it was sent before 11:55 P.M, we have to keep that option open.
 

Alex F

Member
Nov 8, 2013
136
2
83
Phillips told him he was just finished sending the private messages to Cape Race. Phillips had been doing that all day, even after the moment of impact.

Doing what?:)

To send whom?

Don't make me laugh

There was nothing to do during daytime for Phillips (except to get an ice warning). You may check PV of Carpathia. One message per day. Matter of 5 minutes. Nothing else. None ice warning received at all. What was he doing? Was busy? Doing what?

Same for Bride. Bride was idle at daytime. One ice warning received. That's all. To do what?

There was work for Phillips. In the evening. When he might hope to hear and to be heared by nearest shore station (Cape Race). Otherwise he would have to wait next night. It depends on propagation of radio waves and is maximum 250 miles for daytime.

What were they doing all the day?

PS Bride woke up 10 minutes before CQD. So it was at 10:15pm. And 10 minutes after collision (10:05pm).

BR

Alex
 
Nov 13, 2014
337
40
93
Belgium
Alex, you forget that wireless operators did other things rather than receiving ice warnings.

Every day, the purser gave Phillips & Bride a bunch of private radio messages to send to Cape Race. These were collected until the Titanic was able to send them.
By April 13th, the pile had grown quite a lot, and the system failed by the evening. Only Sunday at 5:00 A.M. Phillips could resume sending those private messages.
The actual reason for Phillips being so careless with ice warnings he received: he was way too busy sending private messages.
The ice warning of the Californian of 10:55 P.M? Phillips blocked it off because he was overworked.
 
Mar 18, 2008
2,631
1,118
248
Germany
Phillips did not blocked Californian because he was overworked. The transmission was not in code and also disturbing his communication with Cape Cod.

The "break down" of the wireless is most likely a made up story. The transmission log did not show a gap of several hours. They had several messages to send but sure not too much.
 

Alex F

Member
Nov 8, 2013
136
2
83
There were 4 messages for the Titanic and 4 messages for the Olympic transmitted from Cape Cod that evening. Is it too much?

Who said Phillips was careless? He received ice warning afternoon and sent ice warning (meantime at the time of blocking Californian).
Was he careless?

Cottam (on Carpathia) did not receive any ice warning at all but CQD of the Titanic. And he was wondering why the Titanic was not listening to the Cape Cod for private messages? The band was empty by 10:00pm. What was Phillips doing at the time of transmission of Atlantic Bulletin and private messages from Cape Cod at 10:00pm?

PS

Alex, you forget that wireless operators did other things rather than receiving ice warnings.

Every day, the purser gave Phillips & Bride a bunch of private radio messages to send to Cape Race. These were collected until the Titanic was able to send them.

Ok. That was work of purser. To collect messages and give to Phillips. Messages are waiting all the day. So what? What Phillips was doing until the evening?
 

Similar threads

Similar threads