Sunday July 1st 1935 Mauretania Departs Southampton 72 Years Ago Tonight


Status
Not open for further replies.
Hi All,

At nightfall on Sunday, July 1st, 1935, the "White Queen" slowly pulled away from Berth 108 of the "New Dock" for the last time under the command of Captain A. T. Brown. She was heading for Rosyth and the oxy-acetylene torch; her masts were already cut so she would fit under the Firth of Forth Railway Bridge. This anniversary was on my mind and I thought I'd share this scarce press photo of her final departure from my collection with you.

Best,
Eric

R.M.S. Mauretania: Farewell to the Tyne

R.M.S. Mauretania: The Centennial of her Launch
 
K

Kyle Johnstone

Guest
Hello Eric

Thanks for the reminder.

I'd really like to see the photo, but the link won't cooperate...
 
Hi Kyle,

I had neglected to put the address in the link and was just correcting it when you posted - it is working now.

Best,
Eric
 
Hiya Eric,
happy.gif


Thanks for sharing that poignant image.

Lucy
 
Hi Lucy,
happy.gif


Thanks!
Here she is on July 2, 1935 passing off Scarborough at around 10 PM. The original image was overexposed by the photographer to create a full moon effect. In fact, the waxing crescent moon had set behind the photographer some hours before this photograph was taken so I re-adjusted the exposure, amplified the light added to her cut-down foremast and gave a warm sepia tone. I imagine this is about what she looked like like that evening.

Best,
Eric
 
Hi All,

in keeping with the nature of this thread, here she is stopped at Tyneside on the morning of Tuesday, July 3, 1935 at 10 AM, exactly 72 years ago as I post this. This previously unpublished private photograph was taken from a small launch which ventured quite close that day. The Mauretania blew her sirens loudly, brilliant rockets were launched from the bridge and a final message was sent by Captain Brown from the ship to the town that built her some 30 years before. From her forward mast flies a 20-foot Blue Riband proudly stating "1907-1929". It was said many children watching from St. Mary's Island saw their fathers openly weep for the first time.

Best,
Eric
 
K

Kyle Johnstone

Guest
Thanks again.
Gorgeous photo.
How I'd love to get a look at your Mauretania collection!
 
I'll echo that, Kyle!

Yes, Eric, there would have been many a tough Geordie shipbuilder watching with tears running down their cheeks, especially when she steamed northwards until she was out of sight.
 
Hi Kyle & Hi Lucy
happy.gif


I am glad you are enjoying these images. And finally, with overcast morning skies and accompanied by a half gale, the Mauretania entering Rosyth at about 6 AM, Wednesday, July 4, 1935. She has cleared the Forth Railway Bridge and is near St. Margaret's Hope in the Firth. She is shown just before making her last turn to starboard under Pilot Captain Whince of Leith Salvage and Towage. Soon she would be at the Entrance Lock to the Main Basin where a lone kilted piper played a funeral lament. Within a week she would be in Drydock No. 1 and the process of dismantling one of the greatest liners would begin. In 13 short months she would be gone.

Best,
Eric
 
Hi Brent,

I fixed them for you - not sure why they were gone. I only saved small examples so pardon the size. The links to my articles are down until the website is back online.

Best,
Eric
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top