Sunday Service


May 27, 2007
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Neat Info, Ben. I didn't know this either! Recently I've been finding out a bunch of things about the Duff Gordon's that I didn't know. Seems Lady Duff Gordan was connected to Broadway and early Hollywood more then I thought she was. Well early Hollywood anyways. Plus that she was Canadian by birth? Not really sure about that yet. I knew about her Broadway connections but not her place in Hollywood History. Renee Harris helped a young writer, who would go on to write "You Can't Take It With You!" Plus what you brought to light Ben.
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May 3, 2005
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On another thread it has been covered that if you were in one class you would only be allowed in the areas for that class.Were the regulations relaxed for the
religious services ?
Also there is a little" nitpick" about the 1997 movie "Titanic".The verse which ends in "For those in peril in the air" was heard.This verse was not written until many years later.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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Some books have erroneously depicted that an "all ranks" type service was held in the First Class lounge (or Dining Room) on that Sunday. In Geoffrey Marcus' book The Maiden Voyage there is mention of how the second and third class passengers came in "rather shyly" to take their places at the service. In at least one other book I have read about how the steerage passengers were staring in awe at the décor of the first Class public rooms.

Such embellishments were common in some of the earlier works about the Titanic disaster. In reality, the classes were fairly strictly segregated throughout the voyage till the collision with the iceberg and perhaps for a while even afterwards.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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I think Marcus was probably influenced by Margaret Brown's recollection that there were rather poorly dressed people standing at the back of the room during the 1st Class service. Mrs Brown assumed these to be people from 2nd or 3rd Class, but I've always suspected that they were actually ladies' maids and valets, who as personal servants were traveling in 1st Class at a cut-down price and with cut-down amenities.
 
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