Supernatural or Paranormal Titanic


Mar 3, 2001
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In addition to Titanic I'm also interested in the paranormal. Does anyone know if any paranormal or supernatural stories have ever emerged from the Titanic legacy? It seems like it would be 'ripe' for that type of story. I've never heard of anything, but I thought maybe someone here may have.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Quite a few have, though being a techie, it's not something I've paid a lot of attention to. I don't tend to give a lot of credance to claims of the supernatural anyway.

Still, the legends and lore of such are all part of the Titanic story. Hopefully, George Behe will take notice of this as he's done quite a bit of research on the subject. He can go into detail on it, and even offer some insights on the claims which are reasonably credible.
 
Mar 3, 2001
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George, my man! Where are you!
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I do know about the psychic predictions. Although, I hadn't seen that webpage before. It was fascinating. Thanks!

I would looove to read that book. Can someone print a copy real quick??

I probably should have been a little more specific in what I was wondering, it was laaaate.

I'm specifically interested in for example 'ghost ships' or perhaps relatives having seances after the disaster and speaking to victims. Perhaps the victims old homes being haunted or the 'ghost' of the victims being spotted.

I was reading about ghost ships and it made me think of Titanic. It was defintely a unexpected tragedy and death for 1500 people.

I'd def be interested in the credible claims on the warnings too, however. I believe in the supernatural, but I also believe in about 70% of them being hoaxes
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The liars give the real stories a bad name.
 
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Dec 8, 2000
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Amanda,

See if you can get a copy of George Behe’s book through an inter-library loan. Count me as another who thinks you’ll find it interesting. The book has 130+ examples of paranormal phenomena associated with Titanic, presented into sections for comparison and assessment as to their credibility or otherwise. There’s also sections devoted to phenomena connected with WT Stead, leading spiritualist and social reformer, and an examination of the prophetic qualities of Morgan Robertson's 1898 novel Futility.

If you’re interested in séances and contact with Titanic's dearly departed, you can't go past WT Stead. As well as a number of premonitions related to him (including his own short story with some prescient elements - in retrospect), ‘Stead’ made regular contact through séances following his death, providing enough material for a book on his experiences.

The Blue Island: Experiences of a New Arrival Beyond the Veil (WT Stead & Pardoe Woodman, 1922) is an account of Stead’s progress from life into the spirit world, as related through automatic writing by Stead to Pardoe Woodman and Stead's daughter Estelle. Some text is available through www.attackingthedevil.co.uk, Owen Mulpetre's excellent site devoted to all things Stead.

Estelle Stead also wrote a biography of her father (My Father, Personal and Spiritual Reminiscences, 1913) that focuses more on his spiritualism than his journalism or work for social and political reform.

Enjoy.
 
Jun 18, 2007
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Well, I'm not the resident Titanic paranormal expert, but I do have a pretty big interest in this subject. I decided to do a search of ghost stories, since there was one in particular I was looking for, and I found it. It was first posted in this thread: https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5667/72022.html

The relevant part is as follows:

"One that resonates eerily is the apparition connected with Matthew Sadlier of Clooncooe in Ireland, although it was not the ghost of Matthew himself that was purported to have appeared. As Senan Molony relates the tale in The Irish Aboard Titanic after Matthew's wrenching departure from home:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
quote:
Days later, according to oral tradition, a Mr Easterbrook was cycling home when he met Matthew's dead sister walking along the estate avenue. Water was running down the hair of the ghost, which vanished with Easterbrook's balance as bike and rider crashed to the ground.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Matthew was among the lost."

And then, there's a story I came across over at Google some years ago:

"The story concerns an Amateur Radio enthusiast in Croydon.One evening, he was sitting by his radio set, attempting to receive a particularly faint station on the other side of the world, when he was rudely interrupted by a violent hammering on his door.

It was his next-door neighbour, complaining about interference on his television. Since there had been incidents in the past, his natural
inclination was to blame the 'ham'. The radio enthusiast was able to persuade his neighbour that, since he hadn't even been transmitting, it wasn't his fault. Just to be helpful, he offered to go next door and observe the effect.

Sure enough, the picture was being interrupted by buzzing, horizontal lines. The radio enthusiast recognised the cadences instantly - morse
code. The same message was being repeated over and over - CQD DE MGY..... CQD DE MGY...... Judging by the power, the transmitter was
very close, and unless he was mistaken, some idiot was operating aspark transmitter.

The 'ham' was annoyed. It was clear that some hoaxer was deliberatelycausing interference. He contacted the authorities (the GPO in those days) who tried to find the transmitter using their direction finder equipment.

No luck - all of their DF equipment showed more or less the same direction. Wherever the transmitter was, it wasn't in the UK.

One of the GPO engineers contacted the FCC, since the signal seemedto be coming from the USA. The FCC brought their direction findersto bear, and found that the two lines of position, from the UK and the US, crossed at a point at about the latitude of New York, and somewhat south of Cape Race, Newfoundland. This point was subsequently found to be close to (but not the same as) the reported position of Titanic, that fateful night in 1912.

The signal was broad band and very noisy, similar to the sort of transmission produced by a spark transmitter. It was picked up on both sides of the Atlantic, and lasted for about two hours, after which it faded....."

The first story could have happened, the second one is probably apocryphal, but it still makes for interesting reading.
 
Dec 8, 2000
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Thanks, Kritina. I know I've read a 'postscript' to that last story - I just need to find it again now. Oh, and when I do, I'll post it - unless someone else beats me to it.
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Given your interest in Titanic and the paranormal, do you have any other suggestions for Amanda? I freely admit what I know is either from George's book or the WT Stead connection.

(Heh. Kritina's quite right, this is one of those parallel discussion situations.
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Kyrila Scully

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I don't believe in ghosts, but as a romance writer, I find them fascinating.
Having said that, my daughter and I have heard bumps in the night and seen shadows unexplained. We heard on a TV show about ghosts that these apparitions love to inhabit homes with lots of memorabilia. Since my house is practically a Titanic museum, with memorabilia in practically every room of the house, my daughter started screaming at me (teasingly, of course) that it was all MY fault we had a ghost, and that the ghost probably came with the pieces of Titanic coal I bought at an exhibition. So we decided the "ghost" was a Titanic ghost. Next, I found out that Stanley Fox, one of the passengers who perished, shared my birthday, so now we call the "ghost" Stanley. Any time we see shadows or hear bumps in the night now, we say, "Stanley? Is that you?" All in good fun.

Kyrila
 
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Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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As an antidote to all this, I strongly recommend The Wreck of the Titanic Foretold? by Martin Gardner.
 

George Behe

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Hi, Amanda!

>George, my man! Where are you!

Sorry for my silence -- I'm sort of preoccupied with other things at the moment. (My thanks to Ray W. for letting me know about the existence of this thread.)

>I'm specifically interested in for example 'ghost >ships'

To the best of my knowledge, no reported sightings of a 'phantom Titanic' have occurred (although the Weekly World News would have you believe otherwise.) :)

>or perhaps relatives having seances after the
>disaster and speaking to victims.

As Fiona mentioned, my first book contains numerous examples of seances connected with Mr. Stead (and one seance connected with bandsman Brailey, whose father was a noted Spiritualist medium.)

>Perhaps the victims old homes being haunted or >the 'ghost' of the victims being spotted.

Washington Dodge survived the disaster, but his 'ghost' was recently reported to be haunting his old digs in San Francisco. (I'm afraid that's the only Titanic-related 'ghost story' that I'm currently aware of.)

Hi, Fiona!

>‘Stead’ made regular contact through séances >following his death, providing enough material >for a book on his experiences.

The first such book was written by J. Coates in 1913: "Has W. T. Stead Returned?" (Many of the Stead accounts in my own book were gleaned from this little rarity.)

Hi, Kritina!

>"The story concerns an Amateur Radio enthusiast >in Croydon.

My book includes this case in the chapter on "Mistaken Accounts and Deliberate Hoaxes" and points out all of the factual inaccuracies that led me to disregard the account as complete fiction.

Hi, Bob!

>(Usual 5% commission, George?)

Your check is in the mail, old chap. :)

All my best,

George
 

George Behe

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P.S. Perhaps Edith Haisman's son will relate Edith's melodramatic story about her post-disaster trip to the Spiritualist medium in Australia, the "ghostly kiss" she supposedly received from her deceased father that same night etc. etc.
 
May 12, 2005
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George,

In your book I believe you mention Lucy Duff Gordon's "brush" with psychic premonition regarding Titanic. As you know, in her autobiography she glosses over that she was a believer in psychic matters. The truth is, whether she was a "believer" in 1932 when she wrote her book, she did very much subscribe to occult thought at the time of the disaster. Like her sister she went in for spiritualism and was a supporter of the "New Thought" movement. She had grown old and more conservative by the time she penned her memoirs and wanted to downplay some of her more "dotty" past. But she always related (orally at least, according to her grandchildren) that the Titanic prescience was one of many such instances in her life. She claimed the direct opposite in her book in order to seem more believable, I think.

Anyway as to a ghost story, Lucy's house at Versailles is reputed by its present owners to be haunted - by both she and Mlle. Mars, one of Napoleon's ladies, who originally owned the house. I suppose they take turns spooking guests; am not quite clear on who haunts where and when.

On my visits, the place has been anything but scary. There was a magnetic sort of feel about the room that was once her bedroom but I think that must just be from awe on my part!

Best to you,
Randy
 
Mar 3, 2001
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Wow! Thanks so much! Someone's gonna be in every yardsale, flea market, and old bookstore from here to kingdom come! ;)

Thanks for the reply, George! I'm glad someone tol dyou about it. You answered exactly what I was wondering. Thanks to everyone else too for the little tidbits and site links
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I found the stead site particularly interesting.
 

George Behe

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Hi, Randy!

Thanks for the clarification about Lucy's 'toning down' her opinion about the possible reality of psychic phenomena -- much appreciated.

Hi, Amanda!

Glad I could help out. :)

I forgot to mention something, though. Several years ago I saw a TV program about the Molly Brown house in Denver; several employees claimed to have seen a 'ghost' inside the home (although, if I recall correctly, the 'ghost' was thought to be J. J. Brown instead of Molly.) You might want to contact the Molly Brown home if you'd like to learn more about this. (I believe they have a website, too.)

(I'm still hoping that David Haisman will regale ET members with the tale about the 'ghostly smooch.') :)

All my best,

George
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Hi Amanda,

I didn't realize you were looking for George's Titanic: Psychic Forewarnings of Tragedy. I just bought a used copy through Amazon. Keep an eye out for used books there - you can find some good stuff!

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
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Matt Endacott

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i was recently informed on a Titanic ghost by a friend several weeks ago.
He noted it after reading up in the Newcastle Herald about an 1890's house in the Newcastle suburb of Wallsend.
It was being auctioned and previously owned by "relatives of Titanic victim Albert McCray"
Does anyone know who these people were, and if it's correct?
The news article stated it to be haunted by the ghost of McCray himself, waking the occupants in their sleep and opening windows on cold evenings. It is also mentioned he had often visited the house in his childhood. After hearing this i found in the Wallsend Library additinal information on the house - reading that when it had been used as flats (2, one on each floor)a young girl often had scary dreams of drowning and the bath tub water was always much colder than the kitchen sink water!
Can anyone add anything to this story?
Thanks
 

Dave Gittins

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I could add quite a bit to it, under a principle mentioned by Isaac Asimov. Asimov noted that the beauty of nonsense is that you can always add a bit to it, since no consistency or logic is required. I'll add that the water in the bath tub is always coldest in mid-April and especially on moonless nights.

As for Albert, he was et by a lion, as everybody knows.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Matt, spirits are hard to track down but the living are easier, so check out the ET search engine on the main page ('Find Titanic passengers and crew') and try finding Albert McCray. That should settle it.

Dave, if I remember right the lion was exonerated by Lord Mersea at an early stage in his career:

The Magistrate gave his opinion
That no one was really to blame
And he said that he hoped the Ramsbottoms
Would have further sons to their name.
 

Paul Rogers

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I believe Albert's mum disagreed with the judgement, however. My memory's not good, but wasn't her comment something like:

Spend my life raising sons
To feed ruddy lions - not me!
 

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