Question Surface debris after break up?


David Harris

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After the surface break up there must have been a lot of interior furnishings ejected; such as furniture, paneling, tables, etc. Was this ever recovered and either saved or re-used? I recall seeing one photo long ago of a small vessel that had picked up some dining chairs. If nothing else, would that have been done to avoid danger of larger debris floating in ship's paths? Thanks in advance, LOVE finding this site!
 
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Cam Houseman

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After the surface break up there must have been a lot of interior furnishings ejected; such as furniture, paneling, tables, etc. Was this ever recovered and either saved or re-used? I recall seeing one photo long ago of a small vessel that had picked up some dining chairs. If nothing else, would that have been done to avoid danger of larger debris floating in ship's paths? Thanks in advance, LOVE finding this site!
Yes, there was surface debris. Cork, which insulates the uptakes, The Barber shop's Pole, pieces of wood, most notably from the Aft or Forward Grand Staircase. And metal, from the middle of the ship where she broke apart. Even deckchairs and tables, from when they were thrown overboard to function as makeshift rafts. The place of Titanic's foundering was littered with debris.
 

Auden G Minor

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There were some debris of wood was from the two grand staircases, the others were from trunks, deck chairs, collapsibles A and B, wood from cabins, cloths, bodys and lifejackets, I hope this helps you!
 
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David Harris

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Here is an article about the bodies

Talks about the next several months. It also has a section that talks of other ships who saw wreckage. What I found interesting in the article was that people could see paint from the Titanic on the ice in some parts.
Thank you very much; terrific information in the link you provided much of which I had not seen. I didn't realize so many of the deceased were in the water for so long; I had thought most were picked up within days. Makes the tragedy even more sad in so many ways.
 

David Harris

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Yes, there was surface debris. Cork, which insulates the uptakes, The Barber shop's Pole, pieces of wood, most notably from the Aft or Forward Grand Staircase. And metal, from the middle of the ship where she broke apart. Even deckchairs and tables, from when they were thrown overboard to function as makeshift rafts. The place of Titanic's foundering was littered with debris.
Many thanks for your reply; especially regarding the grand staircase. I always figured any portions found from it were from the rear one located near the break up section. As far as I understand the forward staircase went down intact; though I can't understand how it has all disappeared when other parts of delicate wood which were also slowly submerged in the forward sections have survived.
 
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Stewart Hall

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Yes, there was surface debris. Cork, which insulates the uptakes, The Barber shop's Pole, pieces of wood, most notably from the Aft or Forward Grand Staircase. And metal, from the middle of the ship where she broke apart. Even deckchairs and tables, from when they were thrown overboard to function as makeshift rafts. The place of Titanic's foundering was littered with debris.
Hi Cam, I wondered where the cork came from...in the Violet Jessup biography (Brittanic chapter)she mentions swallowing a lot of cork which I believe she said was insulation.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Many thanks for your reply; especially regarding the grand staircase. I always figured any portions found from it were from the rear one located near the break up section. As far as I understand the forward staircase went down intact; though I can't understand how it has all disappeared when other parts of delicate wood which were also slowly submerged in the forward sections have survived.
Absolutely no Problem, David. I love helping people. I agree. yeah, it could either be the Grand Staircase rising up, and that's why we can't find it, or the Aft Staircase when she broke up. Maybe the Forward Grand Staircase floated away nearby, then lost buoyancy, and sank?
 
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Mike Bull2019

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Absolutely no Problem, David. I love helping people. I agree. yeah, it could either be the Grand Staircase rising up, and that's why we can't find it, or the Aft Staircase when she broke up. Maybe the Forward Grand Staircase floated away nearby, then lost buoyancy, and sank?

It's time this 'the staircase floated out' nonsense is put to bed once and for all. Just because a look-a-like film set broke free, it doesn't mean that the real staircase did. Also- and this is fundamental I think- 'the staircase' was actually hundreds of individual wooden pieces, and dozens of metal ones. It almost certainly broke up in situ and was dispersed far and wide within the bow section, probbaly mostly aft. Some of it was definitely ejected from the open end of the bow section on bottom impact because ballustrades have been seen there under the boiler pipes, along with the candelabra from the D deck landing.
 
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Some of it was definitely ejected from the open end of the bow section on bottom impact because ballustrades have been seen there under the boiler pipes, along with the candelabra from the D deck landing.

Do you know where the details about the balustrades under the boiler pipes comes from? I can not remember having seen it.
Yes D Deck candelabra is in the debris field aft of the break area of the bow.

There was a lot of surface debris floating in the water after the sinking from all different parts of the ship and not only from the break up area. Parts of the (wooden) bridge were floating around as well as pillars from the forward grand staircase (one pillar was from D Deck landing which is rectangular) as well parts from cabins and furniture.
One of the most famous parts is a wood panel from the door frame of 1st class lounge on which in the 1997 movie Rose (Kate Winslet) climbed on it.
 
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Cam Houseman

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It's time this 'the staircase floated out' nonsense is put to bed once and for all. Just because a look-a-like film set broke free, it doesn't mean that the real staircase did. Also- and this is fundamental I think- 'the staircase' was actually hundreds of individual wooden pieces, and dozens of metal ones. It almost certainly broke up in situ and was dispersed far and wide within the bow section, probbaly mostly aft. Some of it was definitely ejected from the open end of the bow section on bottom impact because ballustrades have been seen there under the boiler pipes, along with the candelabra from the D deck landing.
Ok, I wasn't talking about the 1997 movie's Grand Staircase, I know it was built differently. (I apologize if I sound rude in the following) but how do you explain the Grand Staircase being missing? even the balustrades?

I think your theory is correct, but tweaked a little. I think the wreckage was the Grand Staircase, just splintered. The majority of it probably lifted up, and splintered within the ship. Then, when she broke in two, the wreckage went down the C and B-Deck First Class Hallways, and out the Bow's open end. Then, the wreckage was dispersed wide through the debris field.
 
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I think your theory is correct, but tweaked a little. I think the wreckage was the Grand Staircase, just splintered. The majority of it probably lifted up, and splintered within the ship. Then, when she broke in two, the wreckage went down the C and B-Deck First Class Hallways, and out the Bow's open end. Then, the wreckage was dispersed wide through the debris field.

I don't think so. Most of the recovered items from the forward staircase show that the staircase left mainly thought the break area aft.
Also consider that the staircase was nearly fully flooded before water pressure break thought the weather cover and dome. It was not like in the 1997 movie when the water breaks thought the dome (which was a great scene). The water lever inside was up to the dome itself by that time.
 
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Cam Houseman

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I don't think so. Most of the recovered items from the forward staircase show that the staircase left mainly thought the break area aft.
Also consider that the staircase was nearly fully flooded before water pressure break thought the weather cover and dome. It was not like in the 1997 movie when the water breaks thought the dome (which was a great scene). The water lever inside was up to the dome itself by that time.
Yes, Ioannis, that's what I meant slightly, that only some of it would come out of the Dome, and most of it would stay within the ship, banging against stuff, splintering even more. Then, when she broke in two, the Grand Staircase went out the open aft end of the Bow through C and B-Deck:
(B-Deck)
1600373095035.png

(C-Deck)
1600372997655.png

Squiggly Line=Breakpoint
 
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Stephen Carey

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Yes, there was surface debris. Cork, which insulates the uptakes, The Barber shop's Pole, pieces of wood, most notably from the Aft or Forward Grand Staircase. And metal, from the middle of the ship where she broke apart. Even deckchairs and tables, from when they were thrown overboard to function as makeshift rafts. The place of Titanic's foundering was littered with debris.
I would think that the cork was from the fridge rooms which were in the after part of the ship on G deck which destroyed itself as it went down. There was apparently a lot of it floating around.
 

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Theres been a few possibilities as to where the cork came from.
1.Fridge insulation
2. Bulkhead insulation
3. Overhead coating (kind of like a popcorn ceiling)
4. Broken up lifebelts.
5. Insulation around some first class cabins because of the heat from below.
That is from the links below. You can decided what sounds plausible. No. 2 I doubt simply because I haven't seen/read anywhere they used cork for bulkhead liners in any of the construction info I've read. I say doubt because I can't prove it.

 
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