Surgeons onboard actually operate while on Titanic


Hitch

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Did any of the Surgeon's onboard actually operate or anything while they where on Titanic? And if so, where did they do it?
 
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I don't know that the surgury itself was actually used, though I seem to recall one of the passengers had to be treated for a broken arm. Suffice to say that the hospital on any Olympic class liner was fully functional and could be used for that purpose if necessery. The Olympic's sick bays had to be used on a number of occassions during her career.
 

Bob Godfrey

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The 'hospital' on Titanic was a collection of rooms where 3rd Class passengers could recuperate in conditions slightly more roomy and better ventilated than their own cabins, with better toilet and washing facilties and with an attendant on hand. This included an isolation section of rooms for those with contagious diseases. 1st and 2nd class passengers on the 'sick list' would expect to be cared for in the comfort of their own staterooms. In the event that surgery was needed, the best equipped locations would be the three 'surgeries' (one for 3rd Class, one for 1st/2nd and one for the crew) which at other times served as consulting/treatment rooms for out-patients - just like those of a modern family doctor or GP.
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Hitch

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Thanks guys.

Another thing I want to ask. In the article that you posted, Michael (many thanks for that btw) stands that the crew was treated in a seperated hospital on C-Deck.
But are Stewards/Stewardesses also crew and if so, then they would be treated in the hospital on C-Deck, no?
 

Mike Poirier

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Hi Carl
Glad I could help. I would say that stewards and stewardesses definitely counted as crew and most likely would have been in the separate hospital.
 

Hitch

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Thanks Michael.

this is maybe a weird question, but I need to know, because I'm writing a novel and its about the Titanic.

So... Did the doctors (on Titanic and general in 1912) had plastic gloves while they where operating? Or was end that invented yet?
 

Bob Godfrey

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Thin rubber gloves had been in common use in operating theatres for about 20 years, but not all surgeons favoured their use. By 1912 most would have accepted the benefit of gloves for their assistants, but many believed that their own work was best done with the unhampered sensitivity of a pair of bare but well-scrubbed hands. Doc O'Loughlin had been in the business a long time, so it's quite possible that he preferred to work with the traditional precision of uncovered hands.
 

Mike Poirier

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Hi Carl
I am at a loss over that question, but I love the fact you are striving to be as authentic as possible for your book. Hmmm... It seems like something Jack Eaton or Charlie Haas would know.
If you write a letter to the TI mailbox
and address it to either or- I am sure they will send you a response. Just go to
www.titanicinternationalsociety.org
and the snail mail address is there. Though you may want to ask the messageboard. The trustees check it and may be able to process it quicker.
Mike
 

Hitch

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thank you Bob for that information.


Michael, thank you. I think if your writing a book you HAVE to be as authentic as possible. Otherwise you don't know what could be real and what not.

Thank you for that link. do you mean that I should mail them with all my questions?
 

Mike Poirier

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Hi Carl
I would try email first. I know Charlie is email capable so if he receives the request by email, you could get a quicker answer.
Mike
 

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