Survivor Quotes and Accounts


Mar 28, 2002
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I met Eva Hart in 1992 and I think the strongest memory she had was the cries of the people in the water. She still shook her head and shuddered and she said "...it was the most horrible sound, I can never forget it. There can be nothing worse". She almost cried when she talked about her father, who died on the Titanic, and this was 80 years on. Very painful memories.
 

Alan Hustak

Member
Mar 18, 2000
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My all time favourite is "Its nothing to worry about, we've sliced a whale in two, we'll be on our way again in minutes."
 

Pat Cook

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Apr 26, 2000
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I have always thought it sadly poignant when Rev. John Harper remarked on the evening of April 14th, after seeing the sunset: "It will be beautiful in the morning."

Best regards,
Cook
 
R

rory salmon

Guest
can anyone give info on "Rose Dawson" ?since seeing the movie , I find it hard to imagine
that the accounts on Titanic occured on it please help
 

Alan Hustak

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Mar 18, 2000
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rory. there was no rose dawson. Its pure fiction. In this case art really didn't imitate life. But you knew that, didn't you?
 
Dec 7, 2000
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This quote is definitely one of my favourites:

quote:

"I was awakened by my brother pounding on my cabin door, and insisting upon my getting up. Thinking that I had overslept and was late, I asked what was the matter ... "
Dr. Henry W. Frauenthal, M. D., May 1912.​
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Compare the senators windy question with Ligtoller's matter of fact response!

Senator FLETCHER. I will get you to state, not only from your actual knowledge of the immediate effect, but also from your experiences as a navigator and seaman, what the effect of that collision was on the ship, beginning with the first effect, the immediate effect; how it listed the ship, if it did; what effect it had then, and what, in your opinion, was the effect on the ship that resulted from that collision.

Mr. LIGHTOLLER. The result was she sank.

Ya gotta love this guy!
grin.gif


Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Ben Holme

Member
Feb 11, 2001
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Here's another classic from the British inquiries:

1872: Then you said something about the side of the ship being torn? - Yes.

The Commissioner: Before you leave that will you tell me where the water came from?

1873: (The Solicitor General) It is the same thing as I was upon, my Lord. (To the Witness.) Where did the water come from? - Well, out of the sea, I expect.


There's no fooling this genius! :)
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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That was from Fred Barrett, one of my favourite characters. The questioner meant to ask whether the water came through the side of the ship, through the bottom, or wherever.

How about Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon, excusing his lack of interest in people other than his seasick wife. "We had had a rather serious evening, you know." Nothing like British understatement!
 
Dec 7, 2000
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Dave! If I had coffee in my mouth it would be all over the monitor!
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There are many silly remarks by survivors to the questions "presented" to them. In 1913 Elizabeth Lines was HEAVILY interrogated about the Ismay and Smith conversation in the reception room. Eventually she was asked questions regarding both men's appearance; height, shaved/unshaved and even the color of clothes they were wearing! She was so overwhelmed by these questions that she said had she known she was going to be asked so many questions she would have paid closer attention.

Out of context, me saying it just like that doesn't of course seem funny. But when one reads the deposition and all the questions thrown at her, one appreciates her answer to Q.183 more.
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Daniel.
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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I think you raise an important point about context there, Daniel. Take, for example, Lowe's 'Ice, I suppose, Sir.' Hilarious on the face of it (and the peanut gallery thought so as well), but when you read the entire exchange and know some of the back story you can appreciate it wasn't just a little quip out of the blue. There was, of course, more to icebergs than that (as Smith was trying to drive at), and when you read the build up to the line and the cathechism Lowe was subjected to on the origin and nature of icebergs you can better understand both why the question was posed and why it was answered as it was.

One of my favourite lines was from Lowe in the lifeboat when the Carpathia was sighted and dissent broke out in the boats under his charge as to whether to approach her or wait for her to come to them:

I've taken command here. I intend to keep command because no one else seems to have sense enough to do it. Now, shut up. We will go to the boat. We can't expect her to come with us.

As for poignancy -

You go. I will find some other boat.
 

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