Survivors' clothes

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WarrenHarding

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I too am on the other side of the pond. Through your friend, any family stories about Quartermaster Hichens? If am correct, Mrs. Brown, the Countess of Rothes, and several other women in the lifeboat had a few choice words to say to him and about him.
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Through your friend, any family stories about Quartermaster Hichens? If am correct, Mrs. Brown, the Countess of Rothes, and several other women in the lifeboat had a few choice words to say to him and about him.

Molly Brown certainly was on Lifeboat #6 of which QM Hichens was in charge. They probably had a repartee that was not exactly friendly but considering both were spirited characters in a dangerous atmosphere, I doubt if there was much to it. It was very likely embellished over the years.

Lucy, The Countess of Rothes was in Lifeboat #8 lowered some 10 minutes earlier, the first on the port side. Able Seaman Thomas Jones merely said that "she had a lot to say", which probably meant that she talked a lot but not necessarily that she argued with him. He put her in charge of the tiller of the boat where she reportedly did quite a good job. Jones was impressed enough to give her the brass plaque bearing the number of their lifeboat when they were rescued by the Carpathia. The maintained a correspondence afterwards and the Countess reportedly sent him £5 every Christmas thereafter.
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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Through your friend, any family stories about Quartermaster Hichens? If am correct, Mrs. Brown, the Countess of Rothes, and several other women in the lifeboat had a few choice words to say to him and about him.
Yes there are. Arthur Peuchen also had quite the exchange with Hichens in lifeboat 6, which is detailed in my upcoming book. Later on board the Carpathia, he and Margaret Brown confronted Hichens regarding his actions in the lifeboat. This is told in the book 'On A Sea Of Glass'. Both my friend and another relative of Hichens have also written books on him, attempting to set the record straight.
 
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Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

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Arthur Peuchen also had quite the exchange with Hichens in lifeboat 6, which is detailed in my upcoming book
Very interesting. Are you able to give us an abstract of what it is called and the topic?
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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Very interesting. Are you able to give us an abstract of what it is called and the topic?
Yes of course. My working title which I hope will be the final one, is "Titanic Survivor: The Life & Times of Lieut-Col. Arthur G. Peuchen". It is a full scale biography of his life, which I've been researching for the last twenty years. Just as other male passengers were, he was treated unfairly after the disaster. It is my goal to set the record straight on him and give him the recognition, and justice that he deserves. So far, four chapters are written regarding his experience aboard the Titanic.
 
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WarrenHarding

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Molly Brown certainly was on Lifeboat #6 of which QM Hichens was in charge. They probably had a repartee that was not exactly friendly but considering both were spirited characters in a dangerous atmosphere, I doubt if there was much to it. It was very likely embellished over the years.

Lucy, The Countess of Rothes was in Lifeboat #8 lowered some 10 minutes earlier, the first on the port side. Able Seaman Thomas Jones merely said that "she had a lot to say", which probably meant that she talked a lot but not necessarily that she argued with him. He put her in charge of the tiller of the boat where she reportedly did quite a good job. Jones was impressed enough to give her the brass plaque bearing the number of their lifeboat when they were rescued by the Carpathia. The maintained a correspondence afterwards and the Countess reportedly sent him £5 every Christmas thereafter.
You are of course, correct. My apologies for putting the Countess in the wrong lifeboat - and yes, she (the Countess) was very much the lady and was quite helpful - and indeed remained in contact with Mr. Jones.

My apologies -

WH
 
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Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

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My working title which I hope will be the final one, is "Titanic Survivor: The Life & Times of Lieut-Col. Arthur G. Peuchen
Great to hear that. I am sure you will be telling us about one Peuchen mystery of the night - those bonds that he left behind. Somehow I have become obsessed with them to the extent of trying to get into Major (as he was then) Peuchen's mind at the time he decided to leave those bonds behind. From what I have read and understood from other posters, there was no absolute guarantee at the time that he would be reimbursed, but I believe that he was. (Please correct me if I am wrong).
My apologies for putting the Countess in the wrong lifeboat
No need to apologize. We all make mistakes and most of us own-up when someone points them out.
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

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I am sure you will be telling us about one Peuchen mystery of the night - those bonds that he left behind.
I do discuss them yes, but I haven't quite solved the mystery..yet.

there was no absolute guarantee at the time that he would be reimbursed, but I believe that he was.
I'm in agreement, as he did state his bonds and stocks were 'registered anyway'.
 
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WarrenHarding

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Could it be that the Major, like so many others thought they would eventually be returning to their cabins? Didn't many of the women leave behind jewelry that was in their cabins?

I am really excited about the book and looking forward to reading it - any idea when and who will publish it? Project date?
 
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WarrenHarding

Member
Great to hear that. I am sure you will be telling us about one Peuchen mystery of the night - those bonds that he left behind. Somehow I have become obsessed with them to the extent of trying to get into Major (as he was then) Peuchen's mind at the time he decided to leave those bonds behind. From what I have read and understood from other posters, there was no absolute guarantee at the time that he would be reimbursed, but I believe that he was. (Please correct me if I am wrong).

No need to apologize. We all make mistakes and most of us own-up when someone points them out.
A true Mea Culpa -
 
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QGW

Member
Arun said: Another item that was found on board Collapsible A was Richard Norris Williams' fur coat. He had taken it off before swimming to the boat and so how the coat got there is bit of a mystery. A White Star official named Harold Wingate had the coat cleaned as best as possible and returned to Williams. But I do not know what happened to it later.


Yes how my grandfather's fut coat was found in Collapsible A by the Oceanic is still a mystery. It can clearly be seen at the bottom of the life boat in one of the photos recently posted on the home page of this site. He is known to state not long after the sinking he took it off in the water before reaching Collapsible A and in his memoirs (written years later) he states he struggled to take it off as soon as he started to swim but found it difficult to do so and did not remove it prior to entering the boat. So the latter has to be the true story.

Two letters posted to him on Titanic via Cherbourg he had in his fur coat pocket still exist and I have them. They were on display in 2012 at the Tennis Hall of Fame when they had their Titanic and Tennis exhibit. In addition to the flask he had in his jacket coat or pants pocket I also possess.

The fur coat was returned to him by White Star after they had cleaned it as best as possible. Initially White Star wanted to charge him for it but he said no thanks. So White Star returned it to him at no cost but the coat was not a shambles and he threw it away at that time. I have the White Star letters to him in regards to this coat. His belt buckle, tie clip, cuff links and collar studs he wore while on board are owned by another family member.
 
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WarrenHarding

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Thank you for sharing such an interesting story of your family - both noted and appreciated!

WH
 
B

Bibliophile

Member
Although not on the Titanic, the smoking jacket of First Class passenger Victor Peñasco was kept by his family and has been displayed in exhibitions
 
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WarrenHarding

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Thank you for sharing this with us - noted an appreciated.
 
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WarrenHarding

Member
Thank you, Tristen -
The museum is on my short list to visit. I appreciate the response.

Warren
 
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