Survivors in New York

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Deb Boyken

Guest
I know many survivors were met by family/friends; and I know there was a ladies' aid emergency care setup for 3rd class passengers who had lost everything. I also know that the Pennsylvania train line set up a special carriage to take survivors directly on to Philadelphia.

But what about survivors who had some money but weren't met by anyone? The ship docked around 9:00 pm, where would they have spent the night? Were there hotels available other than the shelters set up by the Red Cross and the laidies' rescue organization? Was transportation available to get away from the dock and the press? Where would a survivor NOT being met go to spend her first night back on shore?
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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There was no problem. The voluntary organisations of New York pitched in and looked after everybody who needed help. Helpers included the Salvation Army, Catholic groups and even the New York Stock Exchange. As nobody knew for sure the condition of the survivors, many doctors, nurses and ambulances were on hand. If anything, there was more help than was needed.

The third class passengers were all checked by the immigration authorities, who made sure all were going to be cared for.

It's fair to say that the people of New York were most generous. Mayor Gaynor immediately set up a relief fund and money poured in. I fancy that some of the survivors came out of it pretty well.
 
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Adam Odle

Guest
Hello All Again,

Sorry for posting so many new threads.

But i was wondering where did the survivors go after leaving the Carpathia? Did they go to Hotel's? (Waldorf Astoria) Go home? Keep their plans to go where they were wanting to go, the reason for the crossing? Thanks Again

Adam Odle
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Adam, they went just about everywhere. Some of the richer ones went to swanky hotels. Some simply went home. (Quite a few lived in New York). Some had to catch trains to their more distant homes. About 100 third class passengers went to St Vincent's Hospital. I think most of them simply needed a bed, though some were sick or injured. Various other crew and passengers also went to hospital for one reason or another. Some poor passengers were looked after by the immigration societies that cared for new arrivals.

The six surviving Chinese sailors were the only ones confined on Ellis Island. They presumably later joined their own ship.

A number of people abandoned plans to settle in the USA, though some took a while to decide. Two that are well-known were Eva Hart and Charlotte Collyer.

Most of the crew went home on Lapland, reaching England on April 28th. Those that stayed to testify in the US stayed longer. Bruce Ismay was one of the later arrivals. He got home on 11 May, with about 40-50 crewmembers.
 
Jan 22, 2001
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Adam,

Before they left New York, many of the surviving crew members left the Lapland and went to a memorial service at the American Seaman's Friend Society at 507 West Street, just across from the Cunard Line docks. While there, they were given sandwiches and coffee, and clothing to replace what they had lost.

When it opened in 1908, this building was the largest sailor's home in the world. It featured 200 bedrooms, a large library, a game room, a billiard room, a swimming pool, bowling alley, chapel, auditorium, roof garden, restaurant and observatory. Sailors could stay there for 25 cents a night, and the price for officers was 50 to 75 cents.

The building still survives as a hotel - The Hotel Riverview. If you are ever in New York, its definitely worth a visit.
 

Breuer_chair

Member
Oct 27, 2017
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Hi everyone. This site has been indispensable to me as I have been researching disaster relief for Titanic survivors. I recently wrote an article for Voyage that I think members of this site might be interested in. In the Fall of 2018, I spent a day walking around New York City and taking pictures of locations that Titanic survivors would have encountered after their arrival on Carpathia. I narrate my walk and intersperse the narration with historical information about the people and institutions involved in the relief efforts. Here is the citation:

Eric Cimino. "Walking Titanic's Charity Trail in New York City." Voyage 107 (Spring 2019).