Survivors on the Poop Deck


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Mark Webster

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Sorry if this has already come up, but I could'nt see anything on it.

I'v always been curious if anyone knows if any survivors picked up in the water were on the poop deck to the last second when Titanic went under, like in Camerons film with Jack and Rose. The reason for this is that their was eye witness accounts of Father Thomas Byles giving confessions on the aft deck, but I'v never came across any accounts of survivors being on the poop deck when the ship went under. Just curious.
 

Mark Webster

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typical. since posting this i'v just found out that Titanic's storekeeper Prentice, Frank Winnold was meant to have dived of the poop deck and swam to boat 4. Does anyone know of any other survivors who were on the poop deck.
 

Chris Dohany

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Another that comes to mind is trimmer Thomas Dillon, who was also later picked up by boat 4. I don't recall him mentioning Father Byles, however.
 
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Adam Lang

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But wouldn't the ship have sucked them down? If 25 thousand tons isn't enough to suck you down, I don't know what is.

-Adam Lang
 
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>>But wouldn't the ship have sucked them down?<<

And yet, it didn't. Apparantly, the stern sank slowly enough so that there was none whatsoever. Allegedly, the baker didn't even get his hair wet. Not that I believe that much, but he wasn't sucked down.
 
May 5, 2005
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Oh, yeah, I remember reading that very thing in ANTR, wondering how Joughin's hair could have possibly stayed dry. I would think that by the time the stern actually went under, the ship would have picked up some speed at that point, and at least pulled him under a couple of feet or so. When the forward part of the ship started to go down, there were plenty of accounts of people getting sucked under, only to have explosions let them be pushed back up. But hey, these are only my thoughts.
 
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Adam Lang

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Hm, well if the stern was pulled down within minutes by its own weight, then there must have still been a lot of air inside it after it went down. So isn't it possible that all the bubbles and air pressure coming from the stern may have counterbalanced the suction of it? Just a thought, but it sure makes me think.

-Adam Lang
 
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Makes me think of those poor souls stuck a few decks down in the stern section. What a horrible way to go. The implosions that must have taken place as she descended the first few hundred feet would have been unimaginable, and I'm sure it made for some wierd noises heard from people on the surface.
 
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Adam Lang

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Next to drowning, that's near the top on my "Worst ways to die" list.

"I'm sure it made for some wierd noises heard from people on the surface."

It makes me cringe just to think about it.

-Adam Lang
 
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Wayne Keen

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There was a section in the book "The Perfect Storm" that dealt with what might happen as one was inside a ship sinking to the bottom.

For a long time, I thought I was the only person who worried about such things...

Wayne
 
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>>Oh, yeah, I remember reading that very thing in ANTR, wondering how Joughin's hair could have possibly stayed dry. <<

There may be an element of literary license in that one. If the stern sank gently and slowly enough...and it may well have...it's conceivable that he didn't get his hair wet then and there. I just don't think it would have stayed that way for long. When you're paddling around for your life in the cold icy Atlantic, your hair will get wet!

>>So isn't it possible that all the bubbles and air pressure coming from the stern may have counterbalanced the suction of it?<<

Noooooooo...doesn't quite work like that. The suction, if any, is caused by displaced water rapidly rushing back in to fill in the area vacated by whatever mass is going through it. If that mass happens to sink very slowly and sedately...and it does happen...there would be little if any suction at all.

The only thing escaping air would do would be to froth up the surface.
 

Mark Webster

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It makes you wonder where you would have been better off as Titanic went down. I always thought you might stand a better chance being in the forward boat deck, because their was still two lifeboats there, then again the funnel collapsed on passengers and they had suction to fight off,
where as now there was little suction in the poop deck, but the horrors of fighting on the poop deck are obvious.
It must have been a nightmare to even try and swim off the ship that night. Its horrible.
 
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Adam Lang

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Ok just a thought.

"It makes you wonder where you would have been better off as Titanic went down."

I think the forward boat deck would have been a very slim chance at surviving. Remember, the boats could only hold so much people, even less with the sides down. Also add the people on the boats trying to kick you off and you won't have much luck. I'd say my best luck would be at the stern, now that I know there was little suction.

-Adam Lang
 
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