Survivors


Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Dear board members,

In the book Titanic, voices on page 219 are two photos of crew members who survived the disaster.

Does anyone know who they are?

One of the crew members on the photo on the lower half of the page, is Samuel Rule, the one on the front table, right, with beard.

Kind Regards,

Hildo
 

Chris Dohany

Member
Jan 8, 2001
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My guess as to the identities of four in the bottom photo, in addition to Rule:

At the forward table, I suspect the second man from the right on the forward bench is Horace Ross; the third man from the right on Rule's side is Alfred Pugh (wearing a bow tie), and three more over, the young man closest to the wall looking at the camera is Albert Thomas.

At the farthest rear table, below the standing older man in the dark vest, turning to face the camera is Sidney Daniels.

There are others in the photo who look very familiar but I can't place a name to them.
 
Jan 5, 2001
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Dear Hildo,
On the top picture on p.219. The man lying down on the bottom left is Albert Thomas. The first man on the left on the bench is W.H. Nichols. Next to this is Steward Wheat. At the right end of the bench is Wilfred Seward. Lying with his chin resting on the man wearing the cap - the chap with the grin is Percy Ball.
On the bottom picture, the man next to Rule is Steward Nichols. Next to him is Pugh, and then Wilfred Seward. Next to Seward is Allen Baggott, and at the end Albert Thomas. The man against the wall in the pale suit, with the moustache is Wheat. Behind Nichols is Benjamin Thomas.
If you would like to contact me directly you can email me at [email protected]
regards
Craig
 

Hildo Thiel

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Hello everyone,

Thanks for the information about the photos on page 219 of Titanic voices.

In the same book are photos on the pages 203, 220, 225, 226, 227. Who could help me to identify them?

Kind regards,

Hildo
 
R

Rachel Walker

Guest
In the 1997 movie, Titanic, Rose Dewitt Bukater says "six were saved from the water, myself included". But Rose Dewitt Bukater did not actually exist. Does that mean that five were saved from the water? Were any saved? Or was that just made up to make the movie more dramatic?
Rachel
 
Dec 2, 2000
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I'm afraid it's not as simple or as ironclad as that. Certainly, a couple of boats made an attempt to rescue people after the ship sank, but the exact numbers are a tad uncertain. You may wish to read Plucked from the Sea? by by Peter Engberg-Klarström and Tad Fitch. It was one of the very first articles published on ET research and should offer some useful insights on this.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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In what respect Andrew? Certainly Titanic wasn't the first victim of an iceberg and not the last either. You can see a long list of them Right Here. One notable example is the M/V Hans Hedtoft which struck a berg in a storm on the return leg of her maiden voyage and sank with a loss of 95 lives. This happened on 30 January 1959. There have been at least 11 verified sinkings since that time.
 

Julie Dowen

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May 12, 2004
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Mr.Curmudgeon- resident seafaring expert - Hello - as I was doing research today, I briefly glanced at an article about a ship that went down with 450 souls aboard. According to the small article, the ship was found a week or so later at the bottom of the ocean - with no trace of any bodies or of course survivors. Would you happen to know the name of that ship and what was subsequently discovered about its circumstances? I checked your link above and the dates did not match. The paper that I looked at was dated 9/19/19 and the ship went down approximately 9/9/19. I will relook the article up again at some point but was wondering if you happened to know of any such incident within your vast repetoire of oceanic knowledge??? Julie
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Sorry Julie, but this is the first I've heard of it. I'm afraid the sheer numbers of marine casualties outstrips anybody's ability to memorize them all. This one may not have been a victim of an iceberg so you wouldn't find it on that list in the link above.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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That would be the Valbanera, a Spanish liner which went down between the Tortugas and the Florida Keys. It's often quoted as one the great maritime mysteries, since it was reported that, as well as the missing bodies, the lifeboats were still in place and the sunken ship showed no sign of significant damage. All the usual suspects have been suspected as usual - abduction by aliens, Bermuda Triangle, survivors living quietly in Florida (Kyrila, your secret is out!). But the mystery stories often omit the fact that there was a hurricane in the Gulf at the time, and that the wreck was not very thoroughly searched for remains.
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Julie Dowen

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May 12, 2004
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Thanks for the info everyone - as soon as I can, I will post the tiny article that I saw. I was just curious about the follow-up. Wouldn't the families of all of those people have demanded a search at some reasonable time?? Very strange and interesting!
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>But the mystery stories often omit the fact that there was a hurricane in the Gulf at the time, and that the wreck was not very thoroughly searched for remains.<<

Which doesn't surprise me in the least. When events like this happen, people are often in such a rush to look for the sensational, they often forget to look for the mundane. Storms at sea have been killing ships...and some damned big ones...for centuries, and in far greater numbers then icebergs. It's not uncommon for a ship to be overwhelmed befor the crew even knows they're in trouble. I need only point to the Edmund Fitzgerald and the Derbyshire as examples.
 

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