Swimming Pool


Mona Parks

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Nov 12, 2000
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Does any know the name of the swimming instructor on Titanic? Col. Gracie mentions him in his book, but not by name.
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Mona -- you are asking a very serious question that deserves an answer. (I don't know.) However, reading the headline for your post gave me a real chuckle.

-- David G. Brown
 

Mona Parks

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David, You know what? It actually took me a minute to catch on to what you were talking about. It was kinda funny . Thanks for pointing it out. Mona
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
FWIW, I parsed the crew list here on ET to see if I could find the name of the chap who held this position. I came up goose eggs...unless the bath stewards were the one responsible for the pool. If this is the case, then there are several names on the list which would be candidates for the man Walter Lord was talking about.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Mona Parks

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Michael, That was what I originally thought, but Gracie said "He", and "instructor". But you could still be right Michael. Gracie may not have known it was the responsibility of more than one person. Thanks for the tip.
 
Dec 6, 2000
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Mona, Chris, I have looked at Gracie. On page 6 he talks about the racquet professional, F. Wright. On page 7 he mentions the swimming pool attendant; not "instructor". He also refers to the gymnasium instuctor, T.W. McCawley.

In looking at the list of Crew and their duties as listed in the U.S. Senate Report No 806; we have: Wright, F: Racquet-court attendant; and McCawley, T.W: Gymnasium.

As noted by Michael there is no Crew member listed for the Swimming Pool. But as an attendant "not an instructor" the man Gracie referred to may have just been a bath attendant or steward who handed out the towels.

Lester
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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I suspect Lester is right. The pool was so small that swimming instruction would have hardly been practical. It's often referred to as a 'bath', which is more realistic.
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Perhaps "attending" the swimming pool was among the (no doubt many) duties of the Turkish Bath attendants. The pool and the TB were very much in the same locality of F-deck. The gentleman to whom Gracie referred could, therefore, have been one of the following; J.B. Crosbie, Walter Ennis or Leonard Taylor.

Ben
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Sorry people, the above point has been made twice before! Slight oversight there. Those are the names anyway.
 

Charmaine Sia

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Nov 25, 2001
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David,

Your point is really quite cute and gave me a chuckle! I guess the irony comes in when you think of the significance of a situation like that...

Charmaine
 

Chris Dohany

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Jan 8, 2001
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Ah ha, I had never noticed Gracie's mention of the swimming bath attendant. For what it's worth, I'd agree that it was probably one of the Turkish Bath Attendants, perhaps Taylor, as he was the least paid.

The regular "bath stewards" (such as Rule and Widgery) had charge of the various bathrooms in 1st and 2nd class; I've never heard of one of them being tallied off for the swimming bath, but that’s certainly a possibility.
 

Mona Parks

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David,Michael,Lester,Dave,Ben,&Chris, Thanks for all the input. What would I do without you guys? Many,many thanks Mona
 
C

Chris Bailey

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Hi everyone
happy.gif


I was just looking for some more information about the Titanic swimming pool. I've already search the message board but haven't found very much at all.

I was surprised to hear that the Titanic had a swimming pool, as I'd never heard it mentioned anywhere (my earliest Titanic knowledge came from a computer game and the film). I was surprised that despite the Titanic being one of the first ships to have a pool, it is rarely mentioned (it would have been a great shot to include in the film!)

Does anybody have any more information about the pool - which deck it was on, which classes could use it (presumably only first class?)

Thanks, Chris.
 

Matt Smith

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Sep 23, 2002
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Well Chris,

Its was on F-Deck and as far as I know only 1st class could use it. It was a salt water pool that was heated. If you look around you can find pictures and much more info.

Hope this helps
Matt

P.S. Ya, it would have made a great part in the film.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Chris, you won't find much if you search for the "swimming pool". It was known at the time as a swimming bath or a plunge bath. It was only 30' x 14'. In those days, it was thought that merely splashing around in salt water was good for the health.

Matt is correct about who used it and the heating. Photos show a rather mundane area that's quite unromantic and dull. There's just the little pool and a row of changing cubicles.
 
C

Chris Bailey

Guest
Thank you for the information - I've found a picture and it doesn't look very interesting at all! I imagined it to be a grand pool like on the Antonia Graza ("GhostShip") but it seems to be a dingy thing below decks where you can see the metal roof supports!

I've located it on the map too - I must have overlooked it! F-Deck, to the right of the Turkish Bath. (Incidentally - what is a "Turkish Bath" and wouldn't an 'electric bath' be very dangerous?!)

Still, interesting nonetheless. Thank you for your help.
 
Nov 9, 2002
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Hey,
The Turkish Bath consisted of cooling rooms and steam rooms. The electric bath was only dangerous in Titanic Adventure Out Of Time. No electricity was near to going in the person inside of it. I remember reading an account that a woman who went inside it felt dizzy afterwards. People would usually take a dip in the pool after the Turkish Bath. Hope this Helps!

Sahand
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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The electric bath was a device that looked something like an iron lung. The user lay in it, totally enclosed, except for the head. Inside, four little radiators gave off a good deal of heat. It was a personal Turkish bath. Similar contraptions had been around for many years. They were sometimes used to treat things like arthritis. The physician sat by the patient's head and monitored vital signs. If the lady Sahand mentions felt dizzy, she may have overdone the heat.

The Japanese today have a kind of electric bath that does actually consist of a container of water through which a current is passed.

There's quite a lot about these things on the Internet. Search for "Victorian Turkish bath" and you'll find a site devoted to the earlier machines. There's also quite a bit about the Japanese device too.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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I'll just add that the Turkish bath is distinguished from the sauna by the fact that it uses dry heat. Because of that, very high temperatures were reached.
 

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