Teri Milch Titanic My Life as Bruce Ismay


Apr 7, 2001
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Hi to all Titanic enthusiasts!

I am a brand new member to this board but not new to Titanic endeavors.

I wanted to post this to see if I would get responses from any of Bruce Ismay family members or friends. Out there if any of you are Ismay family members or friends I would love to hear from you.

My website is not ready yet but for those who are interested may keep in touch with me by email and I will notify you when it is done.

Teri
[email protected]
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
LOL Bruce! I'm also one of those fellows who don't have a high regard for people who claim they are reincarnations.

Addison Hart
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Mr. Ismay,

So, you think you're Bruce Ismay? Then how come you're not responding to Mr. Meister's question? It should be simple for you to answer, seeing as how you were there and all.

-B.W.
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Brandon,

Perhaps ol' Bruce here can also answer why he/she leapt into a lifeboat instead of going down with his ship.

Addison
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Addison,

Or perhaps Ismay could tell us all whether or not he really had that conversation with Capt. Smith about lighting the last four boilers, eh?

-B.W.
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear Brian Meister,

For some reason the question of a mirror keeps coming up. Could you give some details about this "mirror" question like what people were involved and where? That way I could give my viewpoint on the matter and maybe answer this question once and for all.

Dear Addison Hart,

You ask why did Bruce leap into a lifeboat instead of going down with his ship. My own opinion is: that Bruce was a gentleman with regards to the loading of lifeboats and was extremely hesitant to get into the last one he loaded. He was afraid that there were more women to load but taking a look around the deck one could see that there were no more women around. Chief Officer Wild had told Ismay that there were no more women on deck and still, Mr. Ismay just stood there not getting into the lifeboat. So Mr. Wild, being a big burly man then took Mr. Ismay himself and put him into the lifeboat. There was no reason why Bruce could not be in the lifeboat. There was plenty of room, as the lifeboat was nearly full but could still fit another person in it. If Bruce had gone down with the ship he would have added one more name to the death list. And even though it was okay to be in the lifeboat, Bruce felt very embarrassed by it. And much later, aboard the Carpathia he continued to assert that he should have gone down with the ship but Captain Rostron and the medical doctor tried to console him otherwise but were unsuccessful. He did the honorable thing though, by assisting the passengers into the lifeboats. He should be highly regarded for this deed. And at a time such as this, I do not believe there was time for Bruce to go searching around for more passengers, the ship was sinking at an alarming rate, and Bruce wasn't quite sure if this was the last boat or not. He should be exhonerated for having gotten into the lifeboat and assisting with passengers.

Dear Brandon Whited,

My own personal opinion is: that Bruce did not request from Captain Smith to have the last four boilers lit.

Bruce was traveling as a passenger, not as a crew member, therefore he had very little to do with the operations of the ship.

Sincerely,

Teri
http://www.bruceismay.com
 
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Addison Hart

Guest
Brandon,

Ah ha! Perhaps Bruce never actually died, and is Terri in disguise! Oh that cad, Ismay! After looking at the webpage, I see that the person who believes she was Bruce has no actual evidence to support it, other than she wrote about the ship...and if she does believe in reincarnation, perhaps she was Fireman Nutbean!!! Now, Bill Stead wouldn't have any problem saying "Terri, Reincarnation, absolutely right," but the fact he, he was a weird chap. Now if God intended us to be able to reincarnate, what was the point of his existence, if not to one day allow us to be pure and spotless in his kingdom? In my opinion, to say one believes in reincarnation is anti-Christian.

Also, Bruce, why in heaven's name were you so keen in not allowing more boats to be put on board the ship? I mean, that pretty much killed the 1500 who went down. Second, Bruce HAD EVERYTHING TO DO WITH THE OPERATIONS OF THE SHIP! He jointly owned it!! It was his ship! On the lifeboats, perhaps you can say that Thomas Andrews did the far more honorable thing than Bruce. In that time period, Bruce's actions would be considered cowardly, and they should still be considered cowardly. He was escaping the ship rather than suffer the fate of the poor chaps who were still on the ship. I don't believe he did not see them, as they were bunched all over the place on that ship.

Addison Hart
 
Apr 22, 2012
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Hello Addison,

So, Ismay is a cross-dresser? I knew it! If you look real closely in the Cameron film, you can actaully see lipstick on Mr. Ismay's lips. Seriously though, I don't find past lives to be very beliveable. Like you said, what would be the point of God? Even so, I always though men were reincarnated into men, and women into women. Teri, if you were REALLY Ismay, then you would all ready know who was involved in the mirror story!

And as for the lifeboats, just WHY didn't you want enough put on? Not that the passengers would have been saved, as the ship sank faster than they could get them all away. And I think Ismay DID push Smith into lighting the boilers. Even Mrs. Elizabeth Lines at the enquiry testified about this.

Sincerely,

Jack Thayer
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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Two things.

Teri - Being a complete pedant, I couldn't help noticing that it was only your "personal opinion" that Ismay did not ask Captain Smith to light the last four boilers....and there was me thinking it was your personal experience!

Addison - although I feel that Teri's beliefs have little or no place on the message board when it comes to dissecting the history of the Titanic I also feel that this should be the same for everyone. Teri believes her faith or whatever you wish to call it is justified and correct and that is her perogative.
I feel, as an agnostic, that you are also leaving yourself a little open as I disagree with your beliefs (while not for a moment condemning or belittling them)and by putting forward Christianity as total proof positive that Teri is wrong is highly subjective. The truth is, none of us knows what happens in the big beyond and that everything rests on the faith (or lack of it) as we choose.

This is a bit of a heavy discussion, and I apologize if I have offended anyone or not kept in the spirit of the thread, I didn't mean it!

Regards

Sam
 
Dec 2, 2000
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As I once said, religious beleifs can be one very touchy subject, be they Christian, non-Christian or otherwise. It's not as if anyone can offer proof positive on matters of faith. Perhaps in the interest of peace, we should just let this one go.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Rachel Fellman

Guest
I'm with Sam, completely. Thank you for saying that. And can we please let the mirror story thing drop? If we're thinking of the same mirror story, you're all asking Ms. Milch to recount something that happened just before (or at the moment of) Mr. Ismay's death, in another city, while he was in a coma. I doubt that anybody could remember anything, past life or no, that happened to somebody else while they themselves were unconscious. And even if we have different "mirror stories" in mind, this repeated request is beginning to seem more like a taunt anyway, and it's only stirring up the argument further.

And Mr. Hart, I really don't think that Ismay's ownership of Titanic means he took any role in navigation. Have you read Paul Louden-Brown's in Commutator article (which is on THS' website right now) that disproves many if not all of the Ismay interference stories? You'll often hear of a shipowner who crossed on one of his fleet nitpicking all the way -there are a lot of Albert Ballin stories about this- but never of one who interferes with navigation. Shipowners' business on board their ships sometimes involved passenger areas, or making the passenger-serving crew members run their show more smoothly, but not navigation.

In what way were Andrews' actions heroic? We hear about his determing that the ship was in danger. We hear a few stories of his giving instructions to a chosen few passengers. We hear about his lonely death in the smoking room. That's it. If we assume that all of these stories are true, I still don't see anything heroic in them. He did not go out of his way to save as many people possible, as Ismay did; nor did he die trying to save anyone or in any way improve anyone's chances of survival through his death. How is that heroic?

Also, what's this about Ismay being so keen on not including extra boats? Didn't Walter Lord write about this in The Night Lives On, saying that the best anyone can claim is that Carlisle showed the plans to Ismay -not proposing extra boats, just proposing davits that could hold them-and that the issue only had a few minutes devoted to it? And that Ismay didn't approve, and Carlisle didn't press it? That's not keen, that's apathetic. ^_^
-Rachel
 

Brian Meister

Member
Mar 1, 2001
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I had thought that this whole thing had been put to rest, but, alas, I seem compelled to
answer Ms Milch yet again.
My dear, to give you names and particulars
would answer the question for you, wouldn't it?
The mirror question is something anyone with a
medium passing interest in Ismay would know the
answer to. There are two types of charlatans:
1) does some research but claims all research as
his/her own.
2) does NO research, and can't answer a direct
question.
Sooner or later, both are exposed. Your
silence on this question, frankly, makes
your "story" quite suspect.

As for liking me the most because I "spotted"
you: I think a great many of us have spotted
you. Tag! You're it!

Respectfully,

Brian
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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Rachel

An interesting and provocative argument about "Andrews the hero".

I had never really questioned it until you put it in black and white, especially alongside Ismays actions.I haven't got all my books about me and am stuck in a mental block...is there cast iron proof of Andrews being "heroic" at any stage of the proceedings?

Stoic or heroic.....?

At least he didn't jump in a boat though!

Regards

Sam
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Well this may light off a powder keg- but as much as Mr. Andrews was a gentle and well-respected man, a hero in his hometown, a gentlemanly soul, and possessing of many virtues, by all accounts equally talented as his contemporaries- I too have been swept up in the Man of Myth wave. Probably after reading the Bullock bio many years ago, seeing how Andrews was mourned in the documentary "A Question of Murder", and admiring his calm in the final hour as depicted in ANTR-one can't help but admire the guy. Now you mention it above- I agree Sam- perhaps hero is much too strong a word. And in the final analysis (and here comes the lit fuse-) he did NOT build a very good ship in the end. When one looks at the blueprints for the Lusitania and Mauretania-there's no comparison in the layout of coal bunkers, number of watertight compartments, and other far-thinking details the Admiralty had put into it's subsidized liners. Guess heros and villains are still needed. OK- am running from the fallout.....!
 
Apr 7, 2001
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Dear All,

My intention on this thread is not to discuss matters of reincarnation. My intention is to discuss matters of Titanic, therefore I will do just that. If someone else wants to open up another thread on reincarnation they can do so, at their own risk. If you do though, wish an explanation from me on reincarnation, please email me privately. My email is available for all.

All of the matters I write about are my very own personal experiences, but I write them as coming from Bruce, as that is what is generally expected of me.

In reconsidering the matter further and taking a deeper look within, I wanted to tell you Addison Hart that you are right that it was not okay for Bruce to get into that lifeboat while others lost their lives. He should have stayed behind like a gentleman. I should say that Bruce was indeed a coward. And he sure paid the heavy price for being a coward too, namely the rest of his life. Thomas Andrews did do the far more honorable thing than Bruce did, but dont' forget that Thomas Andrews also tried to save himself at the last minute, even if only to rectify his name from any blasphemy that might occurr after the sinking.

As far as why Bruce did not have enough lifeboats built onto the Titanic, Bruce was too arrogant at the time to listen to anyone else's viewpoints but his own. He thought the ship was strong enough to be built without the extra lifeboats and he also thought it a waste of time because no one was going to need them anyways. The ship was virtually unsinkable, as told to him by Thomas Andrews. Bruce didn't think the ship would sink, and therefore extra lifeboats was uneccessary. Yes, that was the wrong approach to take, but that was the approach he took at that time, nonetheless. And again, he paid a heafty price for it, too. Bruce was also worried that if people saw how many lifeboats were on the ship, they would wonder if she truly was unsinkable. Bruce had a ploy to make the public believe that she was unsinkable so that this would gain her more attention. And attention she got. And again, Bruce went about this all the wrong way, but at that time that's what he did. Stretching the truth about being unsinkable was just another ungentlemanly thing Bruce did in his life. Remember, Bruce was very arrogant and he wanted the Titanic to stand out above and beyond the Cunard Liners. And she did. He just went about it all the wrong way.

My statement of Chief Officer Wild telling Ismay that there were no more women on the deck and Mr. Wild being a big burly man taking Mr. Ismay himself and putting him into the lifeboat can be found in a book entitled, "Story of The Wreck of the Titanic," edited by Marshall Everett. (an original book published in1912)

************************

Dear Brandon Whited,

As for lighting the boilers, I will have to get back to you on that.

************************

Dear Brian Meister,

As for the mirror incident, I will have to get back to you on that. It is true that I have only begun my search into the life of Bruce Ismay since January 2001 this year and many of you from ET are far more advanced in your research than I. I do not claim to be the expert on matters, I only provide my personal experiences.

************************

Love To You All,
TM
http://www.bruceismay.com
 

Sam Brannigan

Member
Feb 24, 2007
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Shelley

I disagree with the bit about the Titanic not being a very good ship. The Lusitania sank in far less time, arguably as a consequence of her longdituinal bulkheads concentrating water on one side of the ship and causing her to gain a massive list and fill quicker. This also made the launch of half her boats almost impossible.

Also, considering the Titanic had five compartments open to the sea I think it is remarkable she lasted as long as she did.
I'm sure if White Star had given a brief for a ship which would float with that much damage, any builder would have given them funny looks!

In Andrews defence, it wasn't his job (equaly, it wasn't Ismays) to take any part in the evacuation of the ship and should have been left to experienced crew members (Ismay found this out by way of Fifth Officer Lowe).

The evidence does show that apart from a few instances he was quite detached from the main drama. As for him being calm and not creating a panic some passengers saw him walking about looking terrified and confused.

The plot thickens.....

Regards

Sam
 

Paul Rogers

Member
Nov 30, 2000
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Phew! Been away a few days and, boy! Has this thread taken off. May I add my £0.02 worth?

Sam: I totally agree with your post of 1st May, as I do with Rachel and Michael's posts. Teri has stated that: "My intention on this thread is not to discuss matters of reincarnation. Let's take her at her word, stop the baiting, accept that everyone has personal religious beliefs and just drop the topic. It'll only end in tears otherwise.

Shelley: You said: "When one looks at the blueprints for the Lusitania and Mauretania-there's no comparison in the layout of coal bunkers, number of watertight compartments, and other far-thinking details."

I haven't got access to these blueprints. Could you expand please on what some of those "far thinking details" were? I'm really intrigued! Also, how were the coal bunkers laid out differently to Titanic? Thanks.

Regards,
Paul.
 

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