"That's White Star Line property!" -- in Titanic 1943?


Jay Roches

Member
Apr 14, 2012
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"That's White Star Line property!" "You'll have to pay for that!"

That line is in A Night to Remember and in Titanic (1998) in a clear homage to the earlier film.

Now, I've seen Titanic (1943), and I can't recall if there's a similar scene, including 3rd class passengers being held back by a gate.

It would make a lot of sense if there was. The whole idea of a passenger having to pay for damaging property on a sinking ship very much fits in with the theme of Titanic (1943), which is that the English only care about profit and money, and therefore see nothing wrong with sending passenger ships at high speed through ice fields or unrestricted submarine warfare zones.

The idea of locking up the lower classes below decks also fits in with an anti-English sentiment. Putting aside the fact that that almost certainly didn't really happen, nearly every film has shown 3rd class people trapped below decks and held back by the crew. That, I know, was an idea that did exist from the time of the disaster, but I couldn't find anything in the inquiries at least that suggests that anyone was chastised for causing damage to company property. It seems like just the thing that Ismay's henchmen would say in a propaganda film.

I don't have a copy of Titanic (1943), so... can anyone comment on whether the WSL property remark originates from there? Or whether it shows people trapped behind gates?

Another thing I distinctly remember from the Selpin film is that it doesn't appear to have any anti-Semitic content. Is there any known or speculated reason for that?
 

Evgueni M.

Member
Mar 21, 2012
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Denver, Colorado, United States
PHP:
"That's White Star Line property!" "You'll have to pay for that!"

That line is in A Night to Remember and in Titanic (1998) in a clear homage to the earlier film.

Now, I've seen Titanic (1943), and I can't recall if there's a similar scene, including 3rd class passengers being held back by a gate.

It would make a lot of sense if there was. The whole idea of a passenger having to pay for damaging property on a sinking ship very much fits in with the theme of Titanic (1943), which is that the English only care about profit and money, and therefore see nothing wrong with sending passenger ships at high speed through ice fields or unrestricted submarine warfare zones.

The idea of locking up the lower classes below decks also fits in with an anti-English sentiment. Putting aside the fact that that almost certainly didn't really happen, nearly every film has shown 3rd class people trapped below decks and held back by the crew. That, I know, was an idea that did exist from the time of the disaster, but I couldn't find anything in the inquiries at least that suggests that anyone was chastised for causing damage to company property. It seems like just the thing that Ismay's henchmen would say in a propaganda film.

I don't have a copy of Titanic (1943), so... can anyone comment on whether the WSL property remark originates from there? Or whether it shows people trapped behind gates?

Another thing I distinctly remember from the Selpin film is that it doesn't appear to have any anti-Semitic content. Is there any known or speculated reason for that?
No, that quote wasn't used in the 1943 film, but it did have a scene where one character rescues another from the ship's prison with an axe.

And there were also no scenes of steerage passengers locked behind gates, because that's a myth that didn't arise until decades later and wasn't prevalent in the 1940s. In fact, the 1943 version features a scene where the steerage passengers march themselves up to 1st Class dining saloon and demand to speak with Captain Smith!
 

Mister Owl

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Jul 1, 2016
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There was a scene in A Night To Remember, where the Steerage passengers break through a barrier to get up top with an ax to the door latch area.
They were threatened by a steward to get in trouble, and in Titanic (1997) They made a tribute to the older film when Jack and rose broke out of a door after being freed.
I have both movies, and watched them both to double check.


I have never seen the older Titanic film.
 
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