The Andrea Doria Disaster


May 5, 2001
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Hi All,

In All the years I have been graced with life, I have seen Titanic movies and "Titanic clone" movies but I have never seen ANY clone movie about the Andrea Doria disaster.

The fact that it was rammed broadisde by the Stockholm and stayed afloat for something like 10 hours or so was truly amazing.....even more amazing was the minimal loss of life, thanks partly to The Titanic Disaster putting enough lifeboats for ALL passengers and the miracle of the little girl who was in bed asleep on The Doria and ended up in the bow of The Stockholm still on the mattress......and lived.

Many years ago a book came out called Saved, The story of the Andrea Doria disaster I believe was the Title...it was a good book, I believe I have it somewhere packed away.

They should make a film of this disaster and also of the Lusitania as well.....

Regards,
Bill
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Bill-- While Andrea Doria had enough lifeboats for all aboard, when disaster struck the passengers and crew were in exactly the same situation as Titanic. Half of the Doria's boats became useless because of the steep list to starboard. That meant...deja vu Titanic...half the people had no where to go to escape a sinking ship.

Two things came together in the Doria sinking that saved those people for whom the lifeboats were of no value. First, the Doria floated long enough to "be its own lifeboat." That was the purpose of Titanic's vaunted subdivision and automatic watertight doors.

Second, the Ile de France turned around and raced pall-mall back to the scene. It was the lifeboats from the Ile that saved the majority of the people trapped aboard the Doria. Some of those lifeboat crews conducted some pretty gutsy small boat handling underneath the overhanging decks of the sinking Doria.

Many other people were actually rescued by boats from the other ship involved, the Stockholm. A transport ship standing by could be of almost no service because there was no way to get people from lifeboats to its decks. Those who castigate Captain Lord of the Californian should consider the Doria episode.

-- David G. Brown
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
Awwwww shucks...David beat me to it. No matter. Bill, David is spot on regarding the lifeboats. When we were researching the article that Tracy Smith, Erik Wood and myself wrote last year, the Andrea Doria was but one of the examples I cited to demonstrate just how time consuming and dangerous intership transfers at sea really are.

Bluntly, with a huge hole in her side, the Andrea Doria took on a 22 degree list withing just a few scant minutes, rendering the portside lifeboats completely useless. They ended up going down with the ship, still in their davits. The capacity they represented was 1004 people.

What made the real difference was the ships proximity to New York and the fact that this is one of the busiest shipping lanes in the world. Rescue vessels were on the way in within minutes of recieving the word and some were on scene within an hour. Had she been in mid ocean, the result would very likely have been very different, and a lot more tragic.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
May 5, 2001
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David & Michael,

Man I hate when this happens...I stand corrected, it was late when I posted that, I did realize that the port side lifeboats were rendered useless just not at that particular time, and I thank you for correcting me and I agree with your assesment Michael that it's proximity to New York probably prevented it from becoming much worse.

Excuse me while I look for a quick way out......

Regards,
Bill
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Evening all,

I remember a film I saw a couple of years ago which reminded me somewhat of the Andrea Doria story, in terms of the rescue anyway.

I think the ship was called the Calloden (?) and an explosion in the engine room had blown a hole in the side of the ship, creating a list which rendered half the lifeboats useless (I know, explosion here, collision AD). Some of the passengers were killed outright in the explosion and others were trapped in their cabins in the wreckage (deaths were instant aboard both). There was a race against time to save a woman passenger who had become trapped and was minutes away from drowning. I believe a similar situation occured aboard the Andrea Doria where the husband of a woman battled in vain to free his trapped wife (saved in film, died on AD).

The film was made in the early 60's and I wondered if the story was based loosely on the Andrea Doria story as it's the closest I've seen to the real thing, film-wise.

Cheers,

Boz
 

Eric Sauder

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Nov 12, 2000
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Iain:

I think the film you're remembering is "The Last Voyage" with Dorothy Malone and Robert Stack. The ship was called the Claridon. The odd thing is that the movie was filmed on board the Ile de France, which was one of the main players in the Andrea Doria/Stockholm collision.

She had been sold to the breakers in Japan and was leased to the film maker after she arrived at the yard. The director had free reign to do almost anything he wanted to the ship because she going to be scrapped anyway. So when you see a bulkhead collapsing in the film, a bulkhead really collapsed. All the explosions were real, and the funnel falling on the bridge was real. She was in pretty bad shape when scrapping finally started.

There was quite an uproar in France because of how well loved the ship was, but they had already sold her and hadn't put any conditions on how she was used after she left France.

Eric Sauder
 
May 5, 2001
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Michael,
The only problem with that is my friend is that the "Senior Moments" will be coming a bit quicker now..
happy.gif


Boz,
The name of the ship is "The Claridon" and the name of the movie is "The Last Voyage" with Robert Stack and Dorothy Malone, it is quite good, and it is available on VHS, dunno about DVD but gonna find out, if it isn't, it should be..not a bad flick as far as funnel flicks go.

Regards,
Bill
 
T

Timothy Brandsoy

Guest
Wasn't there a book called "Collision Course"? I read it years ago. It was a very good depiction.

Tim B
 
May 5, 2001
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Eric...
We must have quite literally posted on top of each other but thanks for the additional info on the ille de france, didn't know all the other stuff...

Man, it's amazing what you can find out by reading this website..(Cynical mode off)

Regards,
Bill
 
Apr 11, 2001
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I will cheerfully sit through any funnel flick but I must say this is not one which will go down in history for great acting. George Sands as Captain Adams turns in a wooden performance and I could vigorously strangle that red-haired child (Tammy Marihugh) chewing up the scenery as Jill Henderson. The audience cheers for her to fall through that hole in the deck! Woody Strode puts in the only believable performance as the black crewman who saves the day. Dorothy Malone should be ashamed of herself- never, since Tammy Faye Baker, has the world suffered such mascara-clogged eyelashes and floods of crocodile tears. Robert Stack nearly got the Golden Laurel award for this- and there WAS an Oscar nomination for Best Effects at the 1961 Oscars. It is a LONG 91 minutes of dreadful acting-my sympathies were entirely with the ship- an ignoble ending for a truly Grand Old Lady.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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P.S. For only 16.99 Barnes and Noble will sell you a copy of The Last Voyage. According to their website, it is not yet available on DVD.
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Matthew- Am waiting for Hollywood to call! In the meantime I am still in reruns on ET's longest running thread Funnel Flicks, More Funnel Flicks, and Funnel Flicks- Still Steaming. Uh, maybe I need an agent?
 

Eric Paddon

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Jun 4, 2002
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"The Last Voyage" I think was not too bad overall. Notice the Titanic reference in the movie when its established that Edmond O'Brien (the Chief Engineer) has a big chip on his shoulder, especially when it comes to captains, because his father died on the Titanic?

The worst part of the film is the cheap bit of B/W stock footage of a WWII ship going down to depict the Claridon's final plunge. Obviously since the filmmakers couldn't completely submerge the entire ship they couldn't get a payoff final shot to match the scenes earlier in the film.
 
May 5, 2001
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Eric,

That cheap B/W stock footage was used in "Ghost Ship" with George Kennedy also....I'd like to know how they thought anyone would believe that that stern going under was "The Claridon", first of all, the lighting was wrong and the stern section that was used didn't even look like the stern of an ocean liner. Does ANYONE know where that particular piece of footage came from...ANYONE....... ..ANYONE?

Regards,
Bill
 

Daniel Cox

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Apr 5, 2004
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The final scene i saw in that movie was the aft funnel sliding into the water and letting out a burst of steam/air.Had the film i saw been cut? as there was no black and white footage of a stern going down.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Hi, Daniel!

I don't remember any shot like that either.

That whole movie creeped me out because it seemed so much of the mayhem they were wreaking on that poor ship could have been just as easily accomplished using sets, models and tank shots. IMO, what they did bordered on the sadistic.

Roy
 
Apr 11, 2001
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I only have the film taped from television-and it was edited for the commercials. I don't recall that stern section scene either. I sure would love to have the footage that ended up on the cutting room floor. No wonder the people of France were outraged-sort of like seeing the UNITED STATES rusting and down at the heels in her declining years after retirement -demoralizing. The Brits would have rescued the Mauretania from such a fate-no grand old lady should go out with a whimper in a Nora Desmond swan song.
 

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