The Californian and the Mystery Ship


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Paul Rogers

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Jun 1, 2000
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Hi all.

I'm almost afraid to ask this question, what with the polarised points of view out there on this subject - but here goes!

I've been re-reading "Titanic - An Illustrated History" again, (it's been four months since last time; I was getting withdrawal symptoms), and have become confused regarding Don Lynch's explanation of the Californian incident. (No, it's not difficult to confuse me!)

Mr Lynch appears slightly "Lordite" in his explanation, but makes the following good points:

(1)The mystery ship was seen by the Titanic some time after she stopped. Therefore, the mystery ship must have been moving, even if only slowly. Yet, both the Titanic and Californian were stationery. So, how could the mystery ship have been the Californian?

(2)Mr Lynch also states that the officers on the Californian saw rockets which only reached halfway up the masthead of the ship they were looking at - hence giving the impression that they were fired by another ship further away.

I'd be grateful for any references someone could give me to material which addresses these above points specifically.

Thanks in anticipation.
 
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Tracey McIntire

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Dear Paul,
I would also recommend reading "The Ship That Stood Still" by Leslie Reade. This is the most comprehensive book on the Californian controversy that I have seen. Although it is out of print, you can still pick up a copy on the web--you might check out Ebay.
Sincerely,
Tracey
 
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Anti-Pogo

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Why don't you read the actual evidence *first* before filtering it through others' interpretation.

The full evidence is available on-line via the Titanic Inquiry Project.
 

Philip Hind

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>>>Webmaster: I really do prefer to use a false name.

A condition of making this board open access is that people use their own names. Nicnames, aliases, false or inclomplete names are unacceptable.

Of course, I can't force you to use your own name but you might find your messages mysteriously disappearing.

It's funny, I thought this was my message board. Certainly the bills seem to come in my name!

P.
 
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Tracey McIntire

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Actually, this is a message for Anti-Pogo. Thank you for mentioning the Titanic Inquiry Project. I had not been aware that this site existed--it is truly an awesome piece of work from the many people involved.
 

Aurora

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"The Ship That Stood Still" is an excellent book. You might want to see if your local library has it or if you can get it on inner-library loan from a different branch.

Aurora
 

Norman Olsen

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Hi Y'all, I was reading the final report of the US Inquiry and the Titanic Inquiry Project. I noticed the testimony given by Capt.Moore of the Mt Temple. He states ordering the helm to starboard to avoid a schooner. He saw the schooner's green light. Also he saw another light aboard that went out shortly, indicating the schooner was possibly manned. He also stated he estimated the schooner's speed at a couple knots. The area he seemed to be indicating sighting this schooner was about four or five miles from Titanic's position. When considering whose lights were seen by the Titanic's crew and passengers, this ship needs to be considered. Senator Smith also stated he had information about a derelict schooner in the area, but doesn't state where he got this information from. If anyone has any further informaton, I'd like to know. Just another thing to consider. Norm
 
Jul 9, 2000
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For whatever this may be worth...and that may not be much...this hypothetical schooner which was supposedly manuevering about would have a slight problem due to the lack of any wind that night.

Now if we knew this vessels name and whether or not it had an auxilary engine,(much less whether or not it really existed.) we might have a bit more meat to chew on.

Just some thoughts.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 

Dave Gittins

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See my posting on another thread. The schooner was a good 30 miles from Titanic. Remember that Moore was going to the wrong place. He thought he was 49 miles from the accident but it was really about 60.
 
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