The Celtic in 1912


Bunny

Member
Oct 21, 2017
4
1
3
Hello there.

I'm hoping for any information on the voyage of the Celtic from Queenstown (or Cobh, or Cork), Ireland arriving at Ellis Island on 20 April 1912.

When did the Celtic leave Queenstown? Or, how long was the voyage?

My maternal grandfather was on that voyage and I'm researching his life and times.

Thank you for any information you can offer.

Cheers,
Bunny Doucet
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
The liner Celtic (affectionately called Titanic's smaller sister) was featured in the Evening World newspapers in New York on April 20th 1912.



Celtic.PNG



.
 
Jan 5, 2001
2,299
129
258
Celtic carried 1,507 passengers on this crossing: 191 first class, 389 second class and 927 third class. The ship was not empty by any means. Do you know which class he was in, Bunny?

Best wishes


Mark.
 

Bunny

Member
Oct 21, 2017
4
1
3
Hello, Mark. Thank you for your reply and good question.

No, I don't know what class my grandfather travelled.

I imagine the voyage prices and experiences would have been very different for the three different classes.

Do you have information on the prices and experiences? If yes, I'm interested.
 
Jan 5, 2001
2,299
129
258
Yes Bunny, I've got quite a lot of information about the different rates in each class (bear in mind also that first class rates, in particular, varied considerably depending on the stateroom you booked and whether it had a private bathroom). And you're absolutely right - there was a marked difference between sailing in third or first. The finest first class accommodation included suite rooms with private bathroom accommodation and they were placed comfortably on the upper decks. By contrast, although third class was improved markedly over other ships preceding her, a significant number of Celtic's third class passengers slept in open dormitory accommodation.

There's quite a bit of information online illustrating the various public rooms in first class (less so for second and third), but I hope you'll forgive me plugging my own 'Big Four' book which is a nearly 200 page large hardback format illustrated history of all four ships. The second chapter starts with a very detailed description of accommodation and focuses, in particular, on third class and how they were all accommodated:

Mark Chirnside's Reception Room: Big Four Preview

You may be able to access it if you're near a large library or get it on intra-library loan.

Best wishes

Mark.
 

Bunny

Member
Oct 21, 2017
4
1
3
Thank you, Mark, for your information and link. Your book looks lovely. I will check it out.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

Jim Meehan

Member
Jan 22, 2018
1
0
1
I am researching my wife's Grandfather who was a fireman/trimmer on that voyage. I think conditions for the firemen were quite grim. Does anyone have any photos of firemen at work?
 

Ann McDermott

Member
Apr 1, 2018
8
1
3
61
New York, NY
Does anyone know if there is an archive of arrival times and which pier a particular ship would come to? I am interested in the Celtic on May 18, 1912 .. is there a NY paper I could look at for that?
 

Harland Duzen

Member
Jan 14, 2017
1,587
707
188
Your welcome. As for the Pier, since Celtic was a White Star Liner, she would have normally been docked at Pier 59 (but don't my word for it).
 

Ann McDermott

Member
Apr 1, 2018
8
1
3
61
New York, NY
Yes Bunny, I've got quite a lot of information about the different rates in each class (bear in mind also that first class rates, in particular, varied considerably depending on the stateroom you booked and whether it had a private bathroom). And you're absolutely right - there was a marked difference between sailing in third or first. The finest first class accommodation included suite rooms with private bathroom accommodation and they were placed comfortably on the upper decks. By contrast, although third class was improved markedly over other ships preceding her, a significant number of Celtic's third class passengers slept in open dormitory accommodation.

There's quite a bit of information online illustrating the various public rooms in first class (less so for second and third), but I hope you'll forgive me plugging my own 'Big Four' book which is a nearly 200 page large hardback format illustrated history of all four ships. The second chapter starts with a very detailed description of accommodation and focuses, in particular, on third class and how they were all accommodated:

Mark Chirnside's Reception Room: Big Four Preview

You may be able to access it if you're near a large library or get it on intra-library loan.

Best wishes

Mark.

Mark, So happy to find out about your book, I just ordered it .. Do you happen to know where I could find a list of which piers belonged to which shipping lines. I know Pier 40 (United States Lines for instance). When I was a little girl riding up the West Side Highway, there would be pier after pier. My dad actually worked at pier 26 Chambers Street, Afco Packing company. But I'm interested in the Anchor line, which my grandfather arrived on. But it would be great to know each pier's owners. There is virtually no markers of the history of the waterfront, except maybe at Chelsea Piers. Really looking forward to reading your book! Ann
 
Jan 5, 2001
2,299
129
258
Thanks for the endorsement, Tim. :)

Ann, thanks for ordering the book and I hope you enjoy. I don't know of a list offhand but I am sure records would have been maintained by the port authorities. What period were you looking for, particularly?

Best wishes

Mark.
 

Ann McDermott

Member
Apr 1, 2018
8
1
3
61
New York, NY
Thanks for the endorsement, Tim. :)

Ann, thanks for ordering the book and I hope you enjoy. I don't know of a list offhand but I am sure records would have been maintained by the port authorities. What period were you looking for, particularly?

Best wishes

Mark.
thanks Mark, I found it by searching the Library of Congress Newspapers for the worlds "Incoming Steamers". Since my grandmother was on The Celtic, a White Star ship, I assume she docked at pier 54. Funny, it didn't have times, just the date they left Liverpool. So I guess everyone picking someone up would just head down there and wait? She probably had to clear Ellis Island first since she was in 3rd Class. So happy to now have this knowledge!
 

Ann McDermott

Member
Apr 1, 2018
8
1
3
61
New York, NY
Ann, 54 was a Cunard pier in 1912. As the White Star ad you posted above indicates, White Star's piers were 59 and 60.
Right, OK, thanks for that .. I've been getting very confused by this all because I read they said the Carpathia went first to 59 and then to 54, etc .. and if you go look at 54 today you can see both White Star and Cunard in the lettering .. I think I've got it now.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads