The Chance To Be On TitanicWould You Go


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steve b

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This is a subject i bantered about with friends in recent times, and some were surprised to hear my take on it, others not. What it simply came down to was this simple question: If offered a deal by the devil himself, to have the chance to go and be a part of Titanics maiden voyage from day one, would you take it knowing it meant you could lose your life? My answer i know for certain, but id like to see what others have to say before i disclose my choice..God bless all, Steve
 

Kyrila Scully

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Apr 15, 2001
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Well you certainly won't get the opportunity on Titanic II I tell you. I just saw a program on TLC yesterday with interviews of the men building Titanic II and they are building a fully modern ship with no intentions of making it look anything like the original. They will use 21st century Edwardian style, as they put it! So now we know.
 
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Cátia Lamy

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Hi!

About Titanic II... if it's all differente why will they call it Titanic? That should not be allowed!

About the chance to go on Titanic... I would go... I might die but it would be the most unique and wonderfull chance of my all life!

Cátia Lamy
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Ah...I don't do deals with the Devil (Unless you count the occasional Chief Petty Officer I've worked for over my Navy Career) However, If I had a chance to cruise on the real RMS Titanic...well, sure I would. Starting during fitting out, then at Belfast on 02 April 1912...

And getting off fast in Queenstown on 11 April 1912 with my camera and rolls of film safely in hand.

Parks and Ken Marschall would get first crack at my pics of the tile, navigation bridge...

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Mirriam Wood

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Steve -

Just two questions:

1) What does the devil want in return?

2) Could I take with me photographs of the last Titanic expedition? I would require these in order to convince Captain Smith to change the course of history.

Sincerely,

Mirriam
 
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steve b

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Cmon seriously people think about it..Your being offered a chance to see something that fuels your passions, a chance to go back in another time era, and a chance to be part of something so spectacular.The question is, is the risk of knowing you could lose you life in order to make the time travel worthy in your minds of going back to see all this? I know for myself i would love the chance to be part of it. And not for the chance to take photographs and such, but just to be part of something so special..Something that may have generated more fanfare and pure excitement than anything that comes to mind in recent history.and TitanicII, im sorry but i dont have the interest..for as all previously discussed, it wouldnt come anything close to the original..The chance to see the one and only and travel on her knowing the fate i might meet at see would still be worth it to me..Good responses all and hope to see mo
 

Sam Brannigan

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I think I would go the whole way, but I would be extra specially nice to Murdoch on the trip,keep well away from Lightoller on the night, have a supply of womens clothing to hand (just in case it got really hairy!) and start loitering by the lifeboats around ...oh, say....11.40pm.

On a more serious note, I don't think I could live with the fact I had just witnessed the death of 1500 people and heard their screams for help.

As far as I am aware, none of the real survivors were too fussy about repeating the experience.
The maiden voyage of the Olympic would do nicely though.

Regards

Sam
 
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Mirriam Wood

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Hey, Steve -

My two questions were posed with all sincerity and not at all in a humorous vein. I was weighing my options before committing myself!

Sincerely,

Mirriam
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Hi Steve, I assure you, I was quite serious in my answer. Having been a sailor for 20 years, I have no romantic notions whatever about being part of something that claimed two thirds of the participants lives.

Being on a distressed vessel is no cakewalk. I know as I've walked down that path when the USS Ranger suffered a mainspace fire off the shores of a hostile nation. We were fortunate in that our fire teams knew what they were doing, so any potential danger of being forced to abandon ship was avoided. Still, had our efforts failed, it was a very real possibilty and there was not a single man aboard who wasn't aware of it. It's a sick feeling I have no desire to repeat.

So yes, I would love to go back, camera in hand, along with hundreds of rolls of film. I'd have a field day, but as soon as we hit Queenstown, I would be outta there.

Trust me; some parties are best avoided!

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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steve b

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To both Micheal and Miriam-I sincerely didnt mean my previous post to be in a wrong or mean spirited sense. Just the responses given so far shows the unique dilemas that such a proposition would present. While on the one hand you would love to be part of something that has so strongly fueled your passions, there is also the risk that you could well become one of the 1500, and thats where it gets dicey to say the least. Is the notion of going back into such a wonderful era of of time to see something so beautiful and the people of its times, not to mention maybe having some of the longstanding questions many have asked over the years, would not the oppurtunity to get your own answers from a firsthand perspective have any appeal? Its a heavy choice to make no matter what you decide, and im sure no matter what you would elect to do, in some way its a decision you would make with some regrets. I think we would all love the chance to board her and leave on the 11th, but being offered such a unique oppurtunity, i think the only way it can and should be offered is if you have to make the decision of whether or not you want to experience what everyone on board her did for all the time at sea right up until the end..Once again God Bless All..Steve
 

Steve Arnold

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Jun 28, 2000
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I wouldn't go.

How could I, just for the purpose of satisfying my own curiosity, face 1500 people who I knew were going to die, and do nothing -- as I would be powerless to change the situation? I'm not cut out to be a Cassandra.

What would I do as the voyage progressed? How could one face the Strausses, Lorraine Allison, Walter Douglas, Officer Moody, Thomas Andrews, the third class passengers . . . or for that matter, those who would survive, like Jack Thayer? How could I look upon Douglas Spedden playing with his top, knowing that even after he survived this disaster that his life would still be cut short . . . how could I see that charming picture for real and not burst into tears?

How would I face 11:30 Sunday night? 11:35? 11:39? Could I trade hypothetical curiosity for the right to witness the suffering that would follow?

To seek the opportunity to be on hand for the deaths of 1500 fellow human beings would cross the line into the realm of the morbid and the forbidden. This would be a fool's bargain. A bargain that I if I made, and lived through, I'm sure that I would regret with great agony for ever having considered. It would be a serious intrusion on the memory of the victims. Maybe some of you could handle it, but for myself, no way!
 
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steve b

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I think your missing the point though..Just because you go does not gaurentee you will return. You have the same odds as any of the passengers
 
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Mirriam Wood

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With all due respect, I know my message has been seen, but has it actually been READ? (5th from the top)
Why hasn't anyone welcomed the idea of going back - not to relive the days, the era, nor to experience the surroundings and the people, but for the sole purpose of being given a chance of arriving in time to altogether prevent this horrible tragedy? (Which was the purpose of my second and, as yet unanswered) question.

Please correct me if I misunderstood the question, Steve.

Thanks!

Sincerely,

Mirriam
 

Steve Arnold

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Jun 28, 2000
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I'm not missing your point at all, I understand the premise of your question. Assuming that part of the bargain would be that the tragedy would occur and that I would be powerless to prevent it, I would not choose to be part of the catastrophe. And if someone DID choose to do so and survive, I'm sure they would come home regretting it.
 
Aug 29, 2000
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I have sometimes had the dream of being aboard on that night-standing at the foot of the Grand Staircase, looking up and speaking to a man who has no face. I tell him not to worry that I know when all of the lifeboats will be leaving and that I can stay with him until the last one leaves. I always wake up before I find out who he is. Yes- I would go back for the voyage, with the provision that I could be allowed to alter the sequence of events. If not to convince the Captain to change course (remember the Time Tunnel episode?)- at least to be able to save some lives. Maybe the little Alison girl- maybe coax the Strauses into a boat- so many possibilities. The Final Countdown is one of my favorite movies-exploring the notion of what if someone from the future could intervene in a catastrophic world event. Jack Finney's Time and Again is great reading on this subject- stayed up ALL night with that one.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Would I want to go? No. I don't see the Titanic as a drama but as a tragedy. The ship was beautiful, yes, and many of her passengers were glamorous. But who would want to be in the middle of a disaster? No way. Count me out. I'll take the next boat, any boat but the Titanic. Well, not ANY boat. I'll also pass on the Lusitania, Empress of Ireland, Morro Castle, Andrea Doria...
 
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Mirriam Wood

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Thank you, Steve Arnol, for clarifying this matter. I was (and still am) unable to find the sentence stating that I would be 'powerless to prevent the tragedy.'

In that case I'll pass. As far as I can remember, I've always had an aversion to amnesia -
I think...

Sincerely,

Mirriam
 
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Mirriam Wood

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Shelley -

How strange you should mention "The Final Countdown".
I rented that tape TODAY - and not as a result of this thread.
I just hadn't seen it in 15 years.
Enjoyed it as much as I did the first time around.
 
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wendi parker

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I would go! To be able to walk her decks and see her elegance. To see and hear things only the passengers could see and hear.
The entire experience would be dampened though by the knowledge that in the end, she would sink and many would lose their lives including me.

Wendi Parker
 
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