The cost of filing a lawsuit against White Star Line

Mette McCall

Member
Mar 27, 2011
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I'm trying to find out how costly it was to sue WSL and if this is why so few 3rd class passengers pursued this. I know WSL settled out of court and agreed to pay $663,000 total but does anyone know where to obtain more info on who exactly received these settlements - and how much they got?
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,584
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Easley South Carolina
>>I'm trying to find out how costly it was to sue WSL and if this is why so few 3rd class passengers pursued this.<<<

If you find out, let us know.

I'm not saying that to be a wiseguy at your expense. The problem in this instance is that not all of the records from that period have survived or come to light and I suspect that the information on the costs for individual attorneys have gone to the grave along with their firms. If their successors or heirs have any such records, they're not falling all over themselves to publish them.

Bearing in mind that the rest of this is pure speculation, (NOT verifiable fact!) I think you'll find that the reason a lot of third class passengers didn't persue this was because those who made it to the western side of the ocean alive were quite content to disappear into the woodwork and just get on with their lives. With the whole limitation of liability thing, it's not as if there was a huge pot to collect from.

One source you can go to regarding actual claims is http://www.titanicinquiry.org/lol/claims/claims.php

This is far from a complete list so if you or anybody happens to find anything filed anywhere which has yet to see daylight, the Titanic Inquiry Project would welcome any contributions. (See http://www.titanicinquiry.org/lol/lolh.php )
 

Joseph

Member
Mar 31, 2012
2
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>>I'm trying to find out how costly it was to sue WSL and if this is why so few 3rd class passengers pursued this.<<<

If you find out, let us know.

I'm not saying that to be a wiseguy at your expense. The problem in this instance is that not all of the records from that period have survived or come to light and I suspect that the information on the costs for individual attorneys have gone to the grave along with their firms. If their successors or heirs have any such records, they're not falling all over themselves to publish them.

Bearing in mind that the rest of this is pure speculation, (NOT verifiable fact!) I think you'll find that the reason a lot of third class passengers didn't persue this was because those who made it to the western side of the ocean alive were quite content to disappear into the woodwork and just get on with their lives. With the whole limitation of liability thing, it's not as if there was a huge pot to collect from.

One source you can go to regarding actual claims is TIP | Limitation of Liability Hearings | Deposition of Captain Charles Johnston, Continued.

This is far from a complete list so if you or anybody happens to find anything filed anywhere which has yet to see daylight, the Titanic Inquiry Project would welcome any contributions. (See TIP | Limitation of Liability Hearings )
I know this is an old entry but just in case anybody is interested about the premise of the question and finds this entry, you should know that first class passenger Mrs. Margaret Brown, a woman of considerable means, put a claim against White Star line for $27, 887.00 dollars. She settled her claim against them after almost four years for the sum of $10,000 for the loss of her jewelry, clothes, etc. Titanic turned her into a political figure. She voiced her opinion that the "women and children first" policy was tragically immoral. Women demand equal rights on land--why not on sea? she asked an opinion which was also expressed by many feminists at the time. She spoke out for maritime reform, women's right to vote, and improved conditions for miners. In 1914 she ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate on the Democratic-Progressive ticket in the state of Colorado. A second or third class passenger did not stand a chance. as they could not litigate for 4 years to recover their losses.