"The Darksome Bounds of a Failing World: The Sinking of the 'Titanic' and the End of the Edwardian Era" by Gareth Russell


Seumas

Member
Mar 25, 2019
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Glasgow, Scotland
Just noticed this new addition to the Titanic "library".

Published in hardback only last month.

Has anyone had the chance to read this yet or had any contact with the author ?

Seems like the author is going for the social history angle rather than than any technical angle but thankfully is offering no conspiracy theories.

Full description here:

 
Feb 27, 2020
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Scotland
I have this book in hardback form - very formally written and his wording of things can be very lengthy and rambling... why have 15 words in a sentence when this guy can have two or three times as many...? That being said, he seems to know his stuff, with bells on. I must admit to skipping the sections about the Countess of Rothes (ironic, considering I only live two hours away from Rothes!). It's very much from a historical angle; Gareth Russell is a historian who studied at Queen Uni in Belfast.
 

MartyRyan91

Member
Aug 26, 2019
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Ireland
I'm on my second listen through on Audible. I really enjoyed it. It's a great social history of the era tying the Titanic to the world she appeared into. Fascinating IMO.

I disagree that it's very "wordy" as the narrator is able to get through the whole thing without it being a strain. Wordy books fall apart when read aloud. This doesn't.

Although a bad narrator can ruin many a good book. Wasn't able to get through Titanic on Trial. Will have to read it instead.
 
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Feb 27, 2020
9
4
3
Scotland
It's definitely wordy when you read the physical pages - the author's sentence structuring on a page is long and rambling, with lots of semi-colons. He seems like a reasonably young historian (looks like he's in his 30s?) but his style is very formal. Maybe it comes across differently in audiobook form? The hardback is 397 pages, with 50-odd extra pages of bibliography towards the end. The chapters on Thomas Andrews, the Strauses and the Thayers are great though. It's a fascinating book from what I've read of it so far.
 

MartyRyan91

Member
Aug 26, 2019
6
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Ireland
Well if he's from an academic background that might explain the wordy-ness but it's really a fantastic book. Not too often I'll go through a book twice in the one year!

I'd love another Titanic book from him but another social history of the period of Britain and Ireland would do too!
 

Mike Shea

Member
Mar 4, 2020
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I just purchased this book a few days ago and so far, I am enjoying it. It is very well written and shares more of the personal story among some of Titanic's more notable passengers. It will be a great addition to my nautical library. Being a Victorian/Edwardian history buff it fills another niche in my reading.