The Elderly Couple Photo On Aft A Deck


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Jun 4, 2003
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What is the photo in question just a few messages above that has a double exposure, the one Tarn Stephanos talks about? Can it be found or posted in here? Thanks!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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The only known photo of the Titanic's dining saloon in use was taken by Father Brown and since it's published in a book that was printed recently is under copyright protection. In short: It can't be posted here unless the poster has the express permission of the copyright holder.
 
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Jake Angus

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Ergo, we may conclude that lunch was served to passengers disembarking at Queenstown before the ship anchored off shore...
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Mmmmm..George...the answer remains the same from a legal standpoint regardless of who else speaks up. The Father Brown collection is under copyright and may not be posted without the permission of the copyright holder.

Sorry 'bout that. --
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Jul 9, 2004
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Hi!
I've been searching for that elderly couple and I found a picture of William T. Stead and his wife. When I compared this picture to the pic of the elderly couple standing on deck, I concluded that these persons could be the Steads. I'm not certain, so you can try to compare these pictures.
Regards, Paul

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Apr 16, 2002
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Has anybody ever thought that maybe they were just two strangers who happened to be near each other when the photo was snapped?
 
Dec 31, 2003
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'Couple'? 'Elderly'? IMHO, I think not. The lady is not 40 and the gentleman is not 60. It is evident to me that they know each other, and are amused at being photographed by Browne. With wry wit he has captioned his photograph of his companions simply 'First Class'.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Good point, Don. I too have been wondering why this sprightly pair are so often referred to as 'elderly'. From studying the full-size pic I'd say the lady is 40 plus, but neither is older than me and I manage to get about without a bath chair (on a good day)! But that's our tragedy, Don. To these youngsters, even folks in their prime like thee and me are ancient.
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Jul 9, 2004
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Yeah, your'e right Michael... But to answer Mike:
In 1912 was a 1st Class passenger like mr. Stead too well mannered to stand near to (?another?) woman on a picture, while he was married. And I think sleeping around was not an option for 1912. I think it is his wife...

Regards,
Paul.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>And I think sleeping around was not an option for 1912.<<

Oh, sleeping around certainly was an option, but then as now, one had to be mindful of the 11th Commandment and keep it wholly: "Don't get caught." A number of wealthy men had their "pieces of fluff" on the side and at least one such...Ben Guggenhiem if I recall correctly...was traveling with his mistress.

For all that Edwardian Society was very different in some respects from ours, in a lot of others, it was also very similar.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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My understanding is that in the Brit aristocracy (dunno about the US) the requirement was "an heir and a spare" and after that cuckoos in the nest were tolerated. I think Bertie (Edward VII) had a fair bit to do with this, reputedly being a great begetter of cuckoos. And they did have access to birth control, which of course does assist the 11th Commandment. Mr. Stead doesn't sound this sort of person at all, though.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Mr. Stead doesn't sound this sort of person at all, though.<<

I don't think he was either, though if we're wrong, I suppose he kept the 11th Commandment very well. In any event, after comparing the photo here with the one in the bio taken justbefor he sailed on Titanic, I don't think the gent with that lady is him anyway.
 

Ben Holme

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Feb 11, 2001
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Paul wrote: "In 1912 was a 1st Class passenger like mr. Stead too well mannered to stand near to (?another?) woman on a picture, while he was married."

Not at all. Indeed it was considered an act of chivalry for a first class gentleman to offer his services as an escort to any unaccompanied woman, regardless of whether or not he (or she) was married. Helen Candee, for example, would not have read anything sinister into the intentions behind Col. Gracie's offer to accompany her for the duration of the voyage.

For what it's worth, I'm almost certain that the couple in question were not the Steads. Photographs of Stead in and around 1912 reveal a much heavier-built gentleman with a bushier beard. There are now very few first class passengers whose photographs I have not seen, and it is my belief that the gentleman, in particular, is one of these.

Hence, if anyone has any photographs of Richard William Smith, W.A. Walker, John Smart or Emil Taussig, for example, they would make for an interesting comparison with the "unidentified couple" pic. That being said, it is equally likely that the couple in question were cross-channel passengers.
 
Mar 28, 2002
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Is the timing of when the photographs were taken confirmed? Could this particular photograph have been taken prior to the departure from Southampton and therefore one or the other or both may actually have been visitors who left the ship before she sailed? Does anyone know if Mrs Stead saw her husband off?

Cheers,

Boz
 
May 1, 2004
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If the man was Mr. Stead, a famous spiritualist editor and publisher, the lady may be a fan of his, a fellow spiritualist, or perhaps a secretary. Or she could be a relative (niece, daughter)

The lady is not standing in close intimacy with the gentleman, but walking a little behind him. That may not be important. She may be his wife or daughter and trying to catch up to him. They look like they are having a friendly conversation.

Marilyn P.
 
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