The End is Near


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Timothy Trower

Guest
I still remember a scene from the Falklands War. The QE2 was not allowed to venture into dangerous waters, and the Canberra was. The crew of the Canberra put a huge sign on the side of the ship that read "The Canberra cruises where the QE2 refuses."
 

Joe Russo

Member
Apr 10, 2006
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Wasn't this because of the fear of a bomb and the low melting point of the QE2's aluminum superstucture?
 
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Timothy Trower

Guest
Probably -- considering the effects that Exocet missiles had on other HMS warships -- the Antelope comes to mind. Those aluminum superstructures burned quite well.
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
Joe,

Canberra's superstructure was also made of light-weight aluminum, so I doubt that was the immediate consideration. More than likely, at that time the British Government simply considered the larger, somewhat newer and faster ship to be the more valuable asset.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
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Timothy Trower

Guest
Canberra was fired upon with an Exocet missile, and news footage showed it streaking towards the stern of the ship when it was finally intercepted and exploded harmlessly. Interesting that she too had an aluminum superstructure.
 
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Scott R. Andrews

Guest
The use of aluminum above the strength deck in the construction of large passenger ships was actually fairly common by the late 1950's; in fact, the ship that is the primary topic of discussion within this thread is one such example.

The method of joining aluminum superstructure to steel hull has probably changed in some fashion by now, but back then, to prevent galvanic activity, the juncture between the two metals was made via a band of rivets along or just above the sheer strake. The rivets, instead of directly contacting the joined surfaces, passed through insulating bushings lining the holes and had insulating washers placed beneath the head and point, while insulating sheet material was placed between the faying surfaces of the dissimilar metals. The transition from steel to aluminum would have been invisible except for this telltale band of heavy riveting along the sheer strake. Those rivets are quite large and are similar in appearance to the rivets throughout the doubled plating along Titanic's sheer line, so they stand out like the proverbial sore thumb against the backdrop of the otherwise smooth welded surfaces above and below them.

Regards,
Scott Andrews
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Probably -- considering the effects that Exocet missiles had on other HMS warships -- the Antelope comes to mind. Those aluminum superstructures burned quite well.<<

There is some truth to that. However, it didn't help that this paticular class of frigate wasn't that ruggedly built to begin with, being intended more for the export market and emerging navies in the third world rather then the Royal Navy, and for which, interestingly enough, there were no takers.

The Amazon class...(Type 21)...had very poor resistance to damage and concerns about their durability were noted as early as the so called Cod Wars. The damage which ultimately killed the ships in the Falklands would have killed any ship of the same size, aluminium superstructures or not.

By 1993, the last of these ships were disposed of by sale to Pakistan. They really haven't been missed.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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Nothing posted to show her status after more than a month. I'm guessing there is very little left of the "France" by this time. Perhaps she is only a raft of metal to be towed ashore for final breaking up?
 

Morten Jensen

Member
Mar 4, 2006
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Anyone with a big bunch of money around here? Someone should preserve the funnel! Imagine that funnel as a monument somewhere...
 
Apr 27, 2005
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Got a link to a newer image, Mike? I've seen the last carcass photo with the standing stack. I'm waiting for the image of the stern with exposed engines.
 

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