The framework for the D deck level grand staircase


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Even if the forward grand staircase did indeed float up an out of the dome during the sinking, I'm still inclined to believe the stairs from D deck on down went down with the ship...
The intact framework for the stairs on D deck suggest the stairs went down intact- had that not been the case, wount the framework have been horribly twisted?
What do you all think?

regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
Probably so. Either one of your ideas might have been the case, though no one will no for sure what happened when the foward staircase tore out of the ship. If it did rip loose, there would be slight twisting or bends from the panels breaking free or bits of the screws that held the stairs to the frames.

Also where is the dome? My guess is, as Roy Mengot said, is the dome may be way down in the bottom of the staircase shaft. Under the D deck frame there may be remains of the frame for the dome with tons of shattered glass. Who knows, it might be there, though no one has ever gone below the D deck level to find out.
 

Mike Bull

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Apart from when James Cameron peeped down into E Deck, you mean?!

There's no glass/frame/ballustrades down there, guys- it's all...missing.
 
Then it's probably buried under silt and debris. That's my guess.

The dome for the aft staircase was found in the debris field, so if, if the foward dome flew off, then it might be somewhere out there too, though it would be in many pieces, buried, or by now rusted away to nothing.
 
J

Jeffrey Word

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I know this comes a little late as the last post on this thread was more than a year ago.

I did not know that they had found the Aft GSC's dome in the debris field? Is it totally intact? Can it be raised as a whole dome?

I really don't want to get into the discussion of salvage, grave robbing etc, as my opinions are very mixed on that one.

I've just never seen any pictures of the Aft dome and am curious about it's condition on the seabed. I'd love to see that brought up and put in exhibition. Heck, bring it up and stick it over one of the replica staircases that these exhibits are building. That'd be neat! However, I'm not getting my hopes up as far as the Aft Dome being fully intact as probability says, it's not so. But I'm no expert.

Another good point was brought up on this thread. IF things broke apart and started floating towards the dome as water was rushing in, all the wood and lighter materials probably took the forward dome with it as it rushed out of the ship. Isn't that a possiblity? Possibly leaving at least part of the forward dome in the debris field waiting to be found. *shrug* I hope I'm not making myself sound like an idiot here, just throwing around some ideas.
 
Hello Jeff, I have heard of them finding the dome as well, but I don't know in what condition. Also, I believe there reports at the time of the sinking that there were those that have seen or even floated on parts of 'A' staircase. But I would be more lead to believe that these were aft staircase parts rather than those of the Grand Staircase. But I am curious if these parts were ever collected. I doubt it though.

Geo
 
J

Jeffrey Word

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>>But I am curious if these parts were ever collected<<

Hey George! I believe that the ship that went out looking for bodies a few days after collected some pieces of the staircase. Nothing big, just pieces of the ballustraid(?). (I'm not sure at all how to spell that)

One guy has a small piece of it in his private collection, I just can't recall the name of the guy right now. I think it's on the Ballard DVD 'Titanic Revealed'.

Seems like somebody retrieved a piece of something (could be staircase), a fairly large piece of wood, and turned it into a checker/chess board, or something like that. I think he cut what he found into little pieces and reworked them together to make this piece. It's in one of the exhibits I believe.

Who knows what else was probably picked up, played with, and eventually either thrown out as garbage or sold at a lawn sale.

I admit, at that time, I would have probably taken a deck chair if I found one floating out there. ;-) Who knows though?
 
Hey Jeffrey,
It is actually spelled balustrade but that doesn't really matter. You are correct in the assumption that some pieces of wood from the staircase were recovered. The Minia recovered a newel post facing from one of the GSC's that can be seen on page 179 of Titanic An Illustrated History. I do also recall seeing a program where a guy had a piece of the GSC in his collection as well as other momentos. And I think I recall hearing something about the chessboard. I'll look into it.
Have A Nice Day
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Cliff Johnson
 
Jeffrey,

you asked:

"I did not know that they had found the Aft GSC's dome in the debris field? Is it totally intact? Can it be raised as a whole dome?"

No, it's only a small portion of the aft GSC upper framework, mainly the part that would have held the light fixture/chandelier. The book "Return to Titanic", put out by Ballard and National Geographic, has a photo of it across pages 146 and 147. If your local library has the book, you might wish to check out those pages. The piece of the framework is fragmented, and honestly looks quite fragile.

George,

you wrote:
"But I would be more lead [sic] to believe that these were aft staircase parts rather than those of the Grand Staircase. But I am curious if these parts were ever collected. I doubt it though."

Not too much woodwork was recovered from the disaster site. Most of the ships working the area had the task of bringing in bodies first and foremost, and that which was recovered woodwise included several deck chairs, pieces of woodwork from the GSC (be it aft or fore, most likely aft), part of a desk, and a portion of wood lounge carving, among other small pieces of wood which were used to create small ephemera, such as chess or cribbage boards. It does not appear the items were collected as an official duty, rather crews plucking things that were in reasonable reach for personal remembrances of the disaster.

Illustrated History carries photos of most of these items; refer to pages 56, 178, 179...
 

Damon Hill

Member
AS far as I know the only bits of woodwork from the GSC that were recovered were the newel post as mentioned above and also the outboard side of the starboard handrail from the reception room. It is pictured in a THS Commutator from 1989 (I think). They identified it as being that particular piece as they matched the carving of the leaves etc on it (which apparently always pointed up the stairs), so they knew it was from the Starboard side, and it was unique in shape, in that it wasnt like the flights on the higher decks which just fanned out, rather this one fanned out and then curved back slightly again (For want of a better explanantion) if you look at Titanic plans you'll notice that the D deck flight is slightly differently shaped, hence they surmised that this piece could only have come from the Reception Room. As far as I know it is kept in Nova Scotia, along with the newel post and the panelling from above the forward door of the Lounge.
 
>>One guy has a small piece of it in his private collection<<

That would be a portion of the handrail. The bulastrades were made out of wrought iron and wouldn't tend to float very well.
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Ha. I knew that I had read somewhere about a piece of wreckage being changed. Bertram T. King served on the Minia during the victim recovery mission that the Minia was sent on. He recovered a piece of mahogany wreckage that was floating and carved it into a cribbage board. The carpenter of the Minia also carved the wreckage, but King also made small boxes and picture frames out of wreckage.
 
Would it be possible for the foreward dome to simply tear off during the decent and be somewhere miles away from the wreck site in some undiscivered part of the ocean? How close is the wreck to Titanic canyon? If it's close enough I would check for wreckage down there. Who knows maybe even the compass platform might be down there.
 
>>Would it be possible for the foreward dome to simply tear off during the decent and be somewhere miles away from the wreck site in some undiscivered part of the ocean? <<

No way to know. It's not outside the realm of possibility that it was shredded piecemeal on the way down. It would depend on how quickly the ship went down and what sort of debris was slammed into it. I don't think that it simply popped off.
 
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