The Gangway Door on D-Deck

Christophe Puttemans

Christophe Puttemans

Member
It seems both forward doors on D Deck, to the First Class Reception, are open, while the aft doors there are closed. The port door on E Deck appears to be missing.
It's hard to determine the condition of the starboard E Deck door by the small image, but I can take a look at "the discovery of the Titanic" where the painting is printed in large.
 
N

nejc311

Member
It seems both forward doors on D Deck, to the First Class Reception, are open, while the aft doors there are closed. The port door on E Deck appears to be missing.
It's hard to determine the condition of the starboard E Deck door by the small image, but I can take a look at "the discovery of the Titanic" where the painting is printed in large.

I'm looking at the pictures but I don't see the forward starboard D deck door open. The port one is hanging out since it is depicted before it fell down, but the starboard one seems closed to me.
 
Christophe Puttemans

Christophe Puttemans

Member
I found better pictures of the starboard bow and one should see that the forward starboard D deck door (to the First Class Reception) is open.
1566999

Latestcb20140203213608path prefixes
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
But what about the Port side? Is the forward E-deck door missing?

If it is, could that door, assuming it was closed at the time, be blown off due to the impact of the bow section on the seabed? I have seen animations where the forward hatch cover, which now lies some distance from the bow, being blown off in that manner.

Could the same thing have happened to the Port side E-deck gangway door?
 
Christophe Puttemans

Christophe Puttemans

Member
That is definitely possible. Here is a painting of the port side seen from the rear:
Img34

The crack doesn't go over the E Deck door, which appears to be missing.
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
That is definitely possible. Here is a painting of the port side seen from the rear:
Img34

The crack doesn't go over the E Deck door, which appears to be missing.
Yes, but the crack is quite close to the E-deck doorway. Might that suggest that the lines of force (or whatever you call it) from the impact could have dislodged that door?
 
Christophe Puttemans

Christophe Puttemans

Member
That's not my cup of tea. It's possible, but I'll leave to other experts to say if that's indeed what happened.
 
I

Ioannis Georgiou

Member
Port side forward E Deck door missing, Starboard E Deck door "gone" (the hull is bent outside creating a hole).
D Deck (1st class reception room) port side the forward door was open (and fall of the wreck) the aft door closed. Starboard side both doors closed.

The forward starboard D Deck door is open on the Ken Marschall paintings as there were no wreck images from that side when he did the paintings and he copy the port side. Later the painting was corrected.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
A clock still sits in position on the mantel inside the Straus suite and a cigar case is still resting on the mantel in Ismay's room. Does this suggest the collision with the seabed was quite gentle? Perhaps the forward bow took the full force of the impact and cushioned the rest of the bow section which came to rest with little disturbance. There are plates still stacked in cabinets as well. I would have expected them to be thrown about.



Clockcabin


Plates


Cigarcase




There is an open window on the boat deck. Not sure if it was manually opened or if it popped open by the impact.


Wreckwindow



.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
N

nejc311

Member
Port side forward E Deck door missing, Starboard E Deck door "gone" (the hull is bent outside creating a hole).
D Deck (1st class reception room) port side the forward door was open (and fall of the wreck) the aft door closed. Starboard side both doors closed.

The forward starboard D Deck door is open on the Ken Marschall paintings as there were no wreck images from that side when he did the paintings and he copy the port side. Later the painting was corrected.

I suspected artistic licence on that painting as the later one seems to show the door closed. But do you know of the photos that he used to determine that?

Yes, but the crack is quite close to the E-deck doorway. Might that suggest that the lines of force (or whatever you call it) from the impact could have dislodged that door?
My opinion is that if the E deck doors are open or missing, then it is probably because of the twisting in that area and not because of water blowout. Otherwise we just have another coincidence on our hands (two cracks and two blown out doors coinciding).
 
I

Ioannis Georgiou

Member
I suspected artistic licence on that painting as the later one seems to show the door closed. But do you know of the photos that he used to determine that?

From later dives in the 1990s.
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
Lightoller said his intention was to fill the boats after they had reached the water safely and by opening the gangway doors and throwing down rope ladders the lifeboats could be filled to their full capacity. He believed it was too risky to attempt to fill them "from that tremendous height". Was his idea a good idea? It was certainly the safer choice. Was it common practice to use the gangway doors or was he simply using his own initiative? Do we know if any orders were given to the passengers to go below decks or to stay below decks because the gangway doors would be open?

If you were the officer, would you make use of the gangway doors? If the passengers were too scared to get in the lifeboats from the boat deck, perhaps the gangways doors lower down would have convinced more passengers to leave the ship?



Gangwaydoors1


.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
sir john adams

sir john adams

Member
I have read that the gangway door on D-deck (starboard side?) was opened sometime after the collision to assist passenger loading into lifeboats, but never used. So does that mean it was left open and later forgotten about in the general confusion? If so, how much would that large opening contributed to accelerated flooding of the Titanic in terms of time after the sea reached the lip of the doorway?
It was open on the port side, which attributed tothe port list
 
Kyle Naber

Kyle Naber

Member
I think the open door helped contribute to the port list. When water was allowed to enter from this location, it was then able to travel to all of the uneven spaces (port vs. starboard) of the ship, a lot of large open spaces being on the port side such as Scotland Road.
 
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
I watched James Cameron's Titanic: The Final Word once again a few days ago. In it they seemed to assume that the port side gangway door on D-deck is open on the wreck because it was opened and left open by Nichols and his crew (although I cannot recall Nichols' name being mentioned) on Lightoller's orders. Let us assume for one moment that the first part of that assumption is true, I want to ask something related.

Before I go on, a message to Ionnis G. This is only an assumption to clear some things up and I am NOT claiming it as a fact. So, please don't blow your top!

Let us assume that Lightoller ordered Nichols at around 01:05 hours to take 6 men and go down to E-deck and open the gangway door there. It would have been about 01:10 by the time the boatswain gathered his men and reached the gangway door. If they opened it, they are likely to have seen that they water level was almost at the door's threshold, and so Lightoller's plan to load boats from there would not have been practical. In that case, the men would likely have closed it again and went back, by which time it would have been close to 01:15 hours. Lifeboat #6, launched a few minutes earlier by Lightoller, likely passed that point just after Nichols and his men re-closed the E-deck door, which explains why no one on Lifeboat #6 saw an open gangway door.

If we assume that Nichols and his men then opened the aforementioned D-deck gangway door on the port side for the same purpose and left it open, that might explain why it is so on the wreck.

What I really want to know is, at approximately what time during the sinking did the (never opened or opened and re-closed) Gangway door area on E-deck start to submerge?

Also, at what point did the (assumed to have been) left open D-deck gangway door start to flood? Am I right in thinking that this door was not only a deck higher than the E-deck gangway door but also further aft? That would mean a time lag between submerging of the closed port E-deck gangway door and the open port D-deck door. What could have been that time difference?
 
Top