The Golden Gate Bridge


Status
Not open for further replies.

TOWER3

Member
Jun 11, 2019
130
24
63
Garland, TX
The Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco was built in 1937 and is indeed an impressive feat of engineering and noted for it's International Orange paint color. The bridge has become an iconic part of San Francisco and connects the city with Marin County to the north with 3 lanes of traffic in each direction and two sidewalks on either side for pedestrians and bicycles. The main span is 4,200 feet long and the total length of the bridge is 8,980 feet. The towers are 746 feet tall and clearance under the bridge at high tide is 220 feet. The bridge was constructed during the Great Depression and was designed by Joseph Strauss. Very spectacular bridge.
 

Tim Gerard

Member
Feb 26, 2019
150
71
73
I looked up real quick out of curiosity, Joseph Strauss (Strauss ending in 2 S's) was not related to Isador and Ida Straus (Straus ending in 1 S) who went down with the Titanic.
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
54
32
38
Worland, Wyoming
As a kid who grew up on San Francisco Bay, I sailed beneath it many times. Always a creepy feeling, hearing the traffic above and wondering if someone at the railing would drop something onto us (they didn't). Later I passed under it on an aircraft carrier, and the sense of awe was not diminished. It's been said that as much water passes through the Gate at ebb tide as flows over Niagara Falls. I believe it, as several times we had to wait for the tide to turn before returning in our ancient (and ponderously slow) sailboat. The construction of that iconic bridge was truly an engineering marvel.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user

TOWER3

Member
Jun 11, 2019
130
24
63
Garland, TX
As a kid who grew up on San Francisco Bay, I sailed beneath it many times. Always a creepy feeling, hearing the traffic above and wondering if someone at the railing would drop something onto us (they didn't). Later I passed under it on an aircraft carrier, and the sense of awe was not diminished. It's been said that as much water passes through the Gate at ebb tide as flows over Niagara Falls. I believe it, as several times we had to wait for the tide to turn before returning in our ancient (and ponderously slow) sailboat. The construction of that iconic bridge was truly an engineering marvel.
Did you ever cross the Golden Gate Bridge.
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
54
32
38
Worland, Wyoming
Perhaps a hundred times by vehicle, never by foot. To us, driving over the Golden Gate was as normal as walking to the mailbox. I only had one remarkable experience, sometime in the 60s, when the wind was hitting the steel suspension cables just right. It was like being inside a giant harp. Traffic stopped, and people got out and walked between the vehicles. It was a very rare event, but I suppose not unknown to occur. I can still recall what it sounded like.

A stronger memory is my grandparents taking me on the ferry to Oakland. I realize now that they wanted me to experience it, because they were being phased out - replaced by the bridges. I believe it was the Eureka, built in the 1890s, but am not certain. The images of polished brass, varnished mahogany, white-enameled paneling, the power of the walking beam and the great sidewheels, and the double-ding of the engine telegraph ruined their grandson for life. As proof, here I am on this amazing site, reminiscing with like-minded folks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: 1 user
Nov 14, 2005
1,550
646
248
Perhaps a hundred times by vehicle, never by foot. To us, driving over the Golden Gate was as normal as walking to the mailbox. I only had one remarkable experience, sometime in the 60s, when the wind was hitting the steel suspension cables just right. It was like being inside a giant harp. Traffic stopped, and people got out and walked between the vehicles. It was a very rare event, but I suppose not unknown to occur. I can still recall what it sounded like.

A stronger memory is my grandparents taking me on the ferry to Oakland. I realize now that they wanted me to experience it, because they were being phased out - replaced by the bridges. I believe it was the Eureka, built in the 1890s, but am not certain. The images of polished brass, varnished mahogany, white-enameled paneling, the power of the walking beam and the great sidewheels, and the double-ding of the engine telegraph ruined their grandson for life. As proof, here I am on this amazing site, reminiscing with like-minded folks.
You can still see her if your ever in the area. I would like to see the ships there but to be honest I'm not sure I ever will as my last time in Frisco was very disappointing. Too bad as she was once a really nice city. But the ships there do look good.
 

Bo Bowman

Member
Dec 23, 2019
54
32
38
Worland, Wyoming
Agreed, Steven. I grew up in Aquatic Park, where the Hyde St. Pier is. Knew those museum ships well. My first job was at a chandlery there. But SF isn't the blue-collar waterfront city I grew up in anymore, and I have no desire to see it again. Haven't been there since '94, for my dad's funeral.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Similar threads

Similar threads