The Grand Stair Case

ADDENDUM:

I should add that during the 2000 Expedition, and featured in Tom Friend's USA Today report, that when Anatoloy Sagalovitch attempted to recover a metal/iron artefact, it simply dissolved before the MIR occupants eyes! Perhaps this was the fate of the balustrades?

I do not know if the MIRS follow course, but during all dives to the TITANIC, NAUTILE'S video cameras are always recording (Bottom Time). Security measures I presume. If the French submersible were lost, perhaps a subsequent expedition could retrieve the cameras and determine the reason for it's loss.

Michael A. Cundiff
USA
 

Mike Bull

Member
I'm resurrecting an older thread here, but it ties in nicely with the current part 2 of the GotA outtakes; it truly is staggering to think, that as Parks said, of some 60 or so pieces of ballustrade from the forward GSC, not a single one has been accounted for?

There are simply too many of them to ALL be lying flat under all the muck at each deck level, and no apparent sign of them at the bottom of the staircase area; even then, with so many of them possibly having dropped down there, you'd think at least one or two would show.

So where the heck are they?!

A great mystery!
 
Well, *if* the pieces of the staircase came out of the dome while the ship was dropping to the bottom, they would be scattered all over heck and gone!

Didn't Cameron's GSC come loose, and float up too, during filming. I know that the movie GSC and real GSC were not constructed the same, but I do think there is a similarity to the destruction of both.
 

Mike Bull

Member
Yes, I too think that caution should be used re. comparing the breaking up/floating loose of the film set staris and the real ones, but, one can imagine that the wide, fan-shaped main portion of the stairs at each deck level would take quite an upwards 'whack', both in sheer force and bouyancy, from underneath from the rapidly rising water, and might just have been shifted by that force, especially if like it seems, only D-Deck had the steel beams beneath it. The upper deck stairs may just have been huge, reasonably flat-undersided structures, more 'easily' lifted out of the ship.

But that STILL doesn't account for all the ballustrades missing from between the supporting pillars all around each deck level! Surely SOME would have survived inside the ship, no matter how the majority of the stairs themselves exited the ship.

It's a mystery wrapped up in an enigma, is what it is!
 
It is strange that not a single balustrade has yet been found in the GSC void. However, just because one hasn't been found does not been that there aren't any there. The wreck is chaotic and over the years, the accumulation of silt has buried many objects. The bottom of the GSC void is a tangled heap of debris and even though Cameron photographed it as best as he could, it isn't documented enough to determine for certain if there is any trace of a balustrade to be found there.

The mystery is unsolved...one should not yet draw any conclusions, either way. Maybe one day we'll be able to know, but not now.

Parks
 
One thing is that the britannic was a hospital ship when it sunk, meaning most of it's former glory had probably been taken out and replace with hospital supplies and things needed. I'm not saying the staircase was taken out but it was probably dismantled of its former glory during the transformation into a hospital ship.
 
Uhhhhh...Matt...bear in mind that this wasn't the Britannic we were talking about here but the Titanic and the question of what happened to her grand staircase.
wink.gif
 
ohhhh, I was talking about britannic's staircase as mentioned in the post. Thanks for pointing that out for me Michael, i have to be a little more careful what i'm posting.
 
Well, as seen in the Breaking New Ground documentary on the 1997 movie, the staircase did infact rip off it's foundation during the sudden plunge when the ship began to increase her rate of sinking. The done was compromised, and probably what could float flew out of there very fast. The D deck candelabra and the cherub and other heavy items sank. IMO that's about all you'll find if anyone went beneath the D deck frame. For one, it'd be great to do that, as the elevator cars are down there. If done the remains of the elevator cars would be heavily damaged from the force of impacting the bottom of the shafts, the walls would be bent up, and you might or might not find the operator handles. The doors would be blasted out of alignment or thrown into the opposite wall.
 
>>Well, as seen in the Breaking New Ground documentary on the 1997 movie, the staircase did infact rip off it's foundation during the sudden plunge when the ship began to increase her rate of sinking. <<

Did it?

It's a charming and interesting theory, but one fraught with problems. As Parks indicated last year, we're not talking about something which is structurally the same thing as the real ship.

The movie set, while rendered as accurately as possible is primarily designed to look good, not be the same thing as the way a real ship would be built and as such, it would tend to behave very differently.

Mind you, on general terms, it may have happened that way, but I wouldn't get too comfy with that one.
 
The grand staircase is now thought to have broken off and progressed backward during the sinking and exited out the break in the bow. Evidence to this can be found on the recent Cameron expedition to the wreck. The glass dome iron was found at the base of the stairwell on G-Deck. Evidence also points to Charles Pellegrino's downblast theory for the destruction of the staircase.
 
I remember something to that effect being said in either 'Last Mysteries Of The Titanic' or 'Inside The Titanic' both by Discovery Channel. I can't remember specifically who said it though. Actually it seems like Cameron and someone else were discussing it as a possible option. It seems like at the same time they were showing a CG Titanic rendering indicating how staircase wreckage may have pushed it's way aft through the ship. I don't think they ever concluded that that was the definitive case, though.
 
>>The grand staircase is now thought to have broken off and progressed backward during the sinking and exited out the break in the bow.<<

I'd love to know how this could have happened as well as who said that. The inside of the ship wasn't a hollow shell. There were a lot of cabins and public spaces in the way.

>>The glass dome iron was found at the base of the stairwell on G-Deck.<<

I guess I missed that one. I've seen photos of the foundation that the Grand Staircase was built on and other then the heavy framework, there isn't that much there which is readily visible.
 
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