"The Ismay Line" UK re-print


Seumas

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Just noticed that at the end of last year Wilton J. Oldham's 1961 history of the White Star Line and the Ismay family - "The Ismay Line" - received a UK re-print by publishers Chaplin Books, priced £9.99.

At 283 pages, it does seem a little "thin" regarding the subject matter but apparently does contain a few photographs you don't see very often.

Would anyone who has read this care to offer comment on this book ? Is this worth buying or is it not upto much ?
 

Dave Gittins

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Go for it! It contains much information about White Star ships and the line's relationship with H & W. There are various odd things, such as the line's standing orders to its captains. Shop around. The price online varies a bit and you can save a bit by getting it in Kindle form.
 
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Seumas

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Thanks, I'll definitely see about getting a copy very soon. Looking forward to reading it :)

If "The Ismay Line" can get a re-print after so many years then who knows what other worthy but largely forgotten titles relating to the White Star and RMS Titanic might one day see the light of day again !
 

Dave Gittins

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A recent reprint is Home From the Sea, by Sir Arthur Rostron. It's freely available and not very costly. Another fairly recent reprint is The Deathless Story of the Titanic. (Gibbs).

There is a great deal of old Titanic material online and it can be freely downloaded in various formats. The Gutenberg Project is a good starting point. Here are some books.

The Truth About the Titanic. (Gracie)
Titanic and Other Ships. (Lightoller)
The Sinking of the Titanic. (Marshall)
Titanic (Young).

Most of this material is not particularly accurate. Books were rushed into print in 1912 to make a quick buck. Others were written in hindsight, long after the event.

For something out of left field, download A Journey in Other Worlds, by John Jacob Astor. I've only skimmed part of it, but it's quite remarkable. It's set in 2000 and they have electric cars, Skype and many other modern inventions. Australia's rabbits have been eradicated by a virus (if only!). The hunting expedition on Jupiter is a bit over the top!
 
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Mark Baber

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I'll second Dave's endorsement of The Ismay Line. One of its special qualities is that Oldham had access to a number of members of the Ismay family, and the book includes passages from the diaries of Thomas and Margaret Ismay and material from other family sources.
 
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Seumas

Member
Mar 25, 2019
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Glasgow, Scotland
A recent reprint is Home From the Sea, by Sir Arthur Rostron. It's freely available and not very costly. Another fairly recent reprint is The Deathless Story of the Titanic. (Gibbs).

There is a great deal of old Titanic material online and it can be freely downloaded in various formats. The Gutenberg Project is a good starting point. Here are some books.

The Truth About the Titanic. (Gracie)
Titanic and Other Ships. (Lightoller)
The Sinking of the Titanic. (Marshall)
Titanic (Young).

Most of this material is not particularly accurate. Books were rushed into print in 1912 to make a quick buck. Others were written in hindsight, long after the event.

For something out of left field, download A Journey in Other Worlds, by John Jacob Astor. I've only skimmed part of it, but it's quite remarkable. It's set in 2000 and they have electric cars, Skype and many other modern inventions. Australia's rabbits have been eradicated by a virus (if only!). The hunting expedition on Jupiter is a bit over the top!
Cheers for that, I hadn't realised that Lightollers book was out of copyright.

Astor wrote a Wellsian science fiction novel ! This I must see !

The chances are very slim I know but I am hoping that someone might give "The Maiden Voyage" by Geoffrey Marcus a re-print one day.

It was rather surprising, I thought, that "The Night Lives On" by Walter Lord never got re-printed (well not in the UK anyway) for the centenary, they could even have issued it and "A Night To Remember" together in one volume.

I read one of W. T. Stead's books on ghosts on the fantastic Internet Archive, by heck that man must have loved a thundering good argument !

Some time ago I came across one of Jacques Futrelle's short stories in a crime anthology. It was not bad for a turn of the 20th Century detective yarn.

I'll second Dave's endorsement of The Ismay Line. One of its special qualities is that Oldham had access to a number of members of the Ismay family, and the book includes passages from the diaries of Thomas and Margaret Ismay and material from other family sources.
Thanks Mark.

That seals the deal. I'll get it ordered promptly.

Thank you chaps :)
 

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