The Last Log Of The Titanic By David G Brown


Dec 2, 2000
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Just to add to the ambiguity concerning possibly conflicting testimony and questionable timelines, add to that poor communications. I've seen that much firsthand on ships I served on in day to day operations and in the occassional emergency. It's all too possible that Cheif Bell may have been in the dark on the extent of the damage simply because he didn't get the word in a timely manner.

It happens. Been there, done that.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Cal--

Keep working along the lines you are going. I'll bet you will have one of those "aha" moments when a bit of the mystery falls away and you gaze on the truth for the first time.

My version of boiler room #6 was not built just on the testimony of the "black gang." Remember, what happened there had an impact on events taking place on the bridge and passenger cabins. If boiler room #6 floods earlier than I suggest, then other events like the delay in loading lifeboats becomes inexplicable. So, read the testimony of the boiler room crew--but always in perspective of the whole ship. My version of events was put together as a "best fit" of the bits and pieces of the story available through eyewitness testimony. It is not the only possible arrangement of events, just the one that Dave Brown likes best.

-- David G. Brown
 
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Morgan Eric Ford

Guest
Hi David,
I hope you're checking this thread periodically!

I found a couple of minor problems in your book that you may want to correct in future editions

One of the URL's referenced in "Last Log" has changed. Dr Griffiths' web page is now located at

http://www.stfaiths100.freeserve.co.uk/


There is a typo on page 105. I think the length figure of 114 linear feet should read 144 linear feet.


Regards,

Morgan
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Morgan --

Yes, I still check in from time to time, although most of my hours on the computer are now dedicated to my Great Lakes 1913 storm book.

We will wait to upate all URLs until the last possible moment because they change so often. However, I will note your message. The typo has already been noted and corrected on the master computer disk (or, so I'm told).

Actually, there are more than one typo "gremlin" that entered the text 'tween this computer and the final printed page. And, even some that originated here. The book was read by two editors, a copyreader, a proofreader, and five technical experts before going to press. Yet, within 15 seconds of opening the first copy in my hands I found a "problem." Such are the joys of being human.

Thanks to you and to all the others who are reading the book in large numbers.

-- David G. Brown
 
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Graham Pickles

Guest
Can anyone tell me where to get a copy of Mr browns book other than Amazon.
 
Dec 8, 2000
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G'day Graham,

I'm not sure of your local specialist bookshop options, but you could get Last Log as a special order through one of the larger book chains.

WH Smith have Last Log in their on-line catalogue and could order it in for you. They seem to be about £1 cheaper than Waterstones (who also list it). But the cost is probably something you need to check out locally.
happy.gif


Happy hunting,

Fiona
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Graham --

The U.K. division of McGraw-Hill (parent company of International Marine) supposedly is importing the book in your neighborhood. I can't say for sure since you are over my visual horizon. However, I would appreciate knowing if you are able to locate a copy. I have found that it often helps to jingle a chain or two at headquarters when books are difficult to find. Also, the hardback version is supposedly going to the U.K., while the softback is reserved for Australia/New Zealand. I'm curious if that is the case.

-- David G. Brown
 
Dec 8, 2000
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G'day David,

...while the softback is reserved for Australia/New Zealand. I'm curious if that is the case.

Dunno about the rest of Oz, but up to this weekend I would've been pretty sure your book hadn't yet turned up in any format locally. Or at least not in the shops I frequent more often than I should: the main shops of the 'big three' and several large independent booksellers who carry a wide-ranging stock, all in the Melbourne CBD.

However, a specialist bookseller I should visit more often assures me he's had multiple copies of both formats available for a while now. He was quite interested in the degree of debate on your book too. As I get a discount there I bought a copy on the spot and (hopefully) will get time to read it next week.
happy.gif


That the paperback has been 'reserved' for this area may make economic sense as there is a $10 diffence between the formats. Have you seen the value of our dollar lately? No? Well, neither have we.
wink.gif


I can let you know if Last Log turns up elsewhere if you're interested.

Cheers, Fiona

For what it's worth, here's a plug for the lovely gentlemen at Hyland's: Hyland's Bookshop Others in Oz looking for Last Log could order it there if unable to find a copy closer to home.
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Fiona--

Thanks for the info on distribution of my book in your area. I will pass it forward to my editor and he will pass it eventually to the circulation department. Even in publishing you have to "go through channels." I had been told that no hardback copies were going outside North America and Europe, so that you found one came as a pleasant surprise here.

And, a profound thanks for purchasing a copy of my book. Hope you enjoy reading it.

-- David G. Brown
 
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Graham Pickles

Guest
Hi Dave
regarding your reply to me thanks I will be looking into the books availability this week and will let you know if I have prob's
Thanks again and to the other members who have told me wher to try.
Graham
 
Jan 8, 2001
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David or George,

I read the book and was wondering if anyone besides Fleet acknowledged either in the hearings or off the record that there were several ice warnings handed down from the crow's nest? It's really puzzling for me to think they saw the haze and possibly other bergs and never slowed down despite the captain informing them to do so. Then again, you're right, they were well within the icefield reported by the Mesaba and others and should have saw some!

Thanks guys!

Michael
 
Dec 29, 2000
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Dear Ladies and Gentlemen,
dear Mr. Brown,
maybe I can give another tip for what may haven in the 'black gang area'....
So you 'port araound' made me think, als well as the remind about 4th officer Boxhall false remeber.
My version about you will find in the topic of Collision and sinking theories, I guess it will fit into you story, if I did not include any failures from my inacceptable knowledge, which may could realy happened.
But it will fit into your theorie, as well as in all reports yu mentioned. I was just thinking about technical parts, and now you may find out, if I made a throw or if I did mistake...

Maybe I misplaced my conversation, so this is why I want to lead your eyes to this newbie thread.
 
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Paul Jonathan Brown

Guest
I just want to say to David if you happen to read this: Brilliant writing my Brother!
Your gifted use of words David totally blew me away and what you wrote and the way you wrote deserves a Pulitzer prize to me. I really do mean that sincerely
Respectfully yours
Paul Brown
Keyboardist/Producer/Arranger
http://paulbrownmusic.netfirms.com
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Paul -- A humble thanks for your kind words. And, lest anyone think otherwise, to my knowledge we share a last name only and no other family relationship. Thus, your words have more merit.

One other way I can prove that Paul is not a family "shill" hyping my book -- the last time I tried to carry a tune, I spilled the bucket.

Thanks again Paul. Glad you liked the book.

-- Dave
 
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Morgan Eric Ford

Guest
David,

On page eight of your book you make reference to some information you uncovered about Titanic's pumps. Are you referring to Ismay's testimony about Bell?

John Maxstone Graham (probably mis-spelled) wrote a book titled "The Only Way to Cross". He describes a problem Olympic had with her pumps when one of the coal hatches leaked. Coal debris jammed up the pumps so they had a hard time dewatering.

Regards,

Morgan
 
Dec 4, 2000
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I do not even have a copy of my book with me as I write this, so I am armed only with my less-than-perfect memory. It is my recollection that my comment was regarding Ismay's comments about what Chief Engineer Bell said.

Pumps are a headache at best. The suction end must have some sort of strainer ("strum box") to keep odd debris out. But, the holes have to be big enough to allow easy passage of water. That means junk big enough to choke the pump can also pass through. Even if the strainer works, debris stuck on the outside effectively disrupts the suction and reduces the output of the pump.

Once something gets inside a pump...only blue language, busted knuckles and an assortment of tools will fix things.

Every once in a while a ship has been saved by continuous pumping. That's a real miracle. If just one piece of discarded junk had clogged the pump, the ship would have foundered. We don't have any record of that happening on Titanic, or at least I have not seen anything regarding clogged pumps. Still, the possibility cannot be discounted.

As to why I don't have a copy of my own book handy...well, that's a looooong story.

-- David G. Brown
 
Sep 5, 2001
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Mr. Brown,

I just finished reading your book for the second time and continue to be impressed with your work. I am a history major working on an independent study project about the Titanic; the professor that I'm working with recently suggested browsing this message board for new information. So, that is why I am here...

Your theories about the pumps and watertight doors intrigued me, but since I know very little about ships, I have a few questions:

Was any pumping taking place in the heavily flooded forward holds?

Where was the pumping machinery located?

IF the engineers had succeeded in saving BR#6, how would they have addressed the flooding in the holds? How would the leather suctions hoses enter these flooded compartments? From the top of the bulkhead?

On page 141, you wrote, "In any case, the British report stated that the *new* 10-inch line was enough to handle water spurting through..."

Your use of the word "new" implies that there already was a pump/hose in that room. Did all compartments have some sort of pump/hose mechanism already in place?

I hope that you can clarify the activity of pumps/hoses on the vessel.

One final note, the line of p.118, "...the British belief in upper-class amateurs 'muddling through' on their social superiority" was a brilliant assessment of Ismay!

Thanks,

Nathan Robison
 

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