The London-Southampton boat train


Harland Duzen

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Jan 14, 2017
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On a Sea of Glass states that the First Class boat train left Waterloo at 8:00 and arrived in Southampton at 11:30. The expected trip time was between 1:30 and 1:45, but there was a delay.

I looked up the footnotes for the Boat Train paragraph mentioned in "On A Sea Of Glass" (2015 3rd Edition), and it says the following:

''22 The train times from Waterloo to Southampton are listed in the 1910 reference the Scientific American Handbook Of Travel at 1 hour 44 minutes (page 319). A first hand account of the same passage on June 8th 1911 put the duration at 'about 90 minutes' (Railway and Travel Monthly july 1911 pg. 61.)

''23 Francis Browne is apparently the only one who took the first class boat train and later recalled the departure from Waterloo at 9:45. All other first class accounts the current authors have seen refer to it's departure at 8:00am some books and other histories have recounted that the Second and Third Class Boat Train from Waterloo was the early one, while the First Class Boat Train was the later of the two. However, it has proven difficult to find a first hand reference to this, despite the seemingly logical explanation frequently given for this timing. All we have to go back is the estimates given by passengers, and the known duration of the transit. Further evidence of this may come to light later.

___________________

Also as a quick joke, the Boat Train may have been delayed, but at least they didn't travel by Southern Rail! :D

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erik

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Oct 30, 2017
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Thank you all for such prompt and helpful replies. Have tried other forums and only got snide smart arsed replies in return. Should I succeed in getting published I would like to give thanks and mention to this particular site for its great help to a bloke who just wants to write. Been working on this for a few years now, researching as much as possible, including compiling as complete as possible a database on all passengers and their cabin numbers. Cannot find a complete list so making do with what I have and just hoping the storyline makes up for any minor historical inaccuracies that may occur (on the offchance that I succeed in publication and a Titanic history buff reads my work and gets picky with the details). I have used other events as plot devices and slightly strayed from history (the stoker who pops his head out the fourth funnel in Queenstown is in fact another minor character introduced later and this creates the distraction needed for a particularly superstitious stoker to jump ship undetected. The relevance of the man atop the funnel is revealed later) but I think thats often the done thing in historical fiction.
Thanks again
 
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Mike Spooner

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Hi Erik, I am glad some our information has been some help to you, which makes a big change from all that endless discussion on the two enquires who said what! Quite frankly is only going around in circles! Best of luck with your publishing and let us know when.
Cheers,
Mike.
 
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erik

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Oct 30, 2017
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Much appreciated, thanks mate.

Still making changes to sections of my story. In addition to my fictional characters and their stories, I also decided to incorporate historical passengers and crew and bits of their stories to give the novel more depth, though at this rate, it'll end up being a longer read than War & Peace.

Also trying to find information on a ship that was canceled due to the coal strike that ended April 6, SS Philadelphia. Have read that several passengers were transferred to Titanic. Cant find what date the Philadeplhia had been scheduled to sail - my main character begins as a passenger of Philadelphia transferred to Titanic. Need the date. Have it as April 9, which is probably wrong.
Any help there would be terrific. Cheers again, mate.
 

Harland Duzen

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The SS Philadelphia (1888) of the American Line, was at the time docked at Berth 46 (opposite Titanic's berth with the ships St Louis (1894) and Majestic (1889) docked besides her due to lack of berths available at Southampton due to the Coal Strike.

h53633.jpg

How the Philadelphia looked at the time of the Titanic's voyage.

7d9a0dbf5d.jpg

Ships docked at Berth 46, Southampton due to Coal Strike, Taken from Titanic's deck. (From Left to Right: Majestic (1899), St Louis (1894), Philadelphia (1888) and Tugboat).

White Star Line Berth April 1912 Photoshopped Image by David E. Olivera .jpg

Below is a PHOTOSHOPPED / Composite Image by Artist David E. Olivera (found on Facebook at: David E Olivera). You can see the Philadelphia moored in the middle next to the Titanic.

I afraid I can't find any info about the ship's departure date, but I hope this helps you.

Note: The Philadelphia was originally named the City of Paris, was a sister ship to the New York (the ship that nearly crashed into the Titanic) and originally had 3 funnels before having them replaced with 2 following her running aground and having a refit between 1899 and 1901.

SS City of Paris (1888) - Wikipedia
 

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