The McCoy Siblings


For about four months now I have been trying to track down the McCoy siblings from Ireland. I hear that of the three -- Agnes, Alice and Bernard -- only the two girls have been located. However, nobody can give me any details and I'm hoping someone here might know about them.

Thanks

Cameron Bell
 
R

Ronan Martin McCoy

Guest
I was just wondering does anyone out there have any information on Bernard,Alice or Agnes McCoy (Lifeboat 16) or their family members? I am currently waiting on info to see if they are any relations of myself. If you are or you know the relations of these three passengers please answer this thread. Or if you have any info on the three I would be much obliged if you could please do so also.
Thanks a lot,
R,McCoy-Ireland
 
Hi Ronan,
The McCoys were among the most elusive of the Irish survivors to track down. After a couple of years of searching I found some of their great-nieces and nephews in Virginia and New Jersey and that kind of opened the door. Agnes was a spinster and a domestic to some fairly well-recognized names like Douglas Fairbanks and lived out her life in New York City. She (and her siblings) were born in County Longford, Ireland and Agnes first came to the United States in 1900 seeking work. On January 24, 1957 she was found dead in her New York apartment. There have been family stories on one side that she was murdered, however her death certificates states that she died of natural causes--heart disease. And her great-niece in Virginia says she remembers visiting her as a young girl and she was very ill in bed at the time and her grandfather (William McCoy) did not believe that there was foul play involved.

Alice was the wild one and the only one of the three to marry. She first married a Gardner and later a man named Ras Jacobsen and she had an only daughter, Colaine. Relatives remember that when they would see Alice and Colaine knocking on the door the family elders would begin to shout "Hide the China!" Alice and Colaine both had reputations for getting unruly and breaking things and causing great strife within the family whenever they showed up. Alice died during the Christmas holidays of 1959 and Colaine committed suicide.

Bernard never married and worked in odd jobs with relatives in New Jersey and in New York. Hampered by a serious stutter, he nevertheless managed to live a good and quiet life and died of cancer on July 19, 1945 and is buried in the National Cemetery on Long Island.

The McCoy siblings were children of John and Bridget (Cole) McCoy of Carrickatane, Granard, County Longford. They were from a large family but only descendants of their sister Mary McCoy Heckel, and their brother William McCoy, have been tracked down.

You might want to get a copy of Senan Molony's book "The Irish Aboard Titanic" for further information on them. It is still available from some of the on-line booksellers.

Hope this helps a little.

Phil
 
Dear Ronan,

Look no further than the ET Research article "The Titanic McCoys" by Robert Bracken right here on the ET, complete with many photographs of them.

Robert tracked down the elusive siblings and members of the McCoy family years ago and has included many other details about their lives in his report. The article was subsequently published in Voyage, the quarterly journal of the Titanic International Society, a few years back.

They were a fascinating family to study, and plans are in the works to place a marker on Alice's grave in upstate New York in the near future.

Just thought I'd save you a little time until you may get a copy of Mr. Molony's work - a good read indeed.

Sincerely,

Michael Findlay
 
R

Ronan Martin McCoy

Guest
Does anyone know how to contact the McCoy three's remaining relatives?
And can anyone suggest some great Titanic books?
Thanks a mil,
Ronan McCoy.
 
Ronan, for information and reviews on books check out Michael Tennaro's excellent website, especially the 'book of the year' section:

http://www.titanicbooksite.com/index.html

The two books I most often recommend for those starting a collection are first of all the one that started it all 'A Night to Remember' by Walter Lord, and then 'Titanic, an Illustrated History' by Don Lynch and Ken Marschall. For the Irish connection, Senan Molony's book has already been mentioned.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
ET Research article "The Titanic McCoys" by Robert Bracken right here on the ET, complete with many photographs of them
I happened to be reading this article just now and came across an interesting bit of information. Agnes McCoy, the oldest of the 3 siblings, reportedly worked as a maid in many rich families in America. Among them was the Fairbanks family (yes, them) and she was apparently the "favourite maid" of Douglas Fairbanks Jr.
 
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