The Mirs

  • Thread starter Colin W. Montgomery
  • Start date

Nov 29, 2005
85
2
88
Michael,
I think you know more about this than me. I'm not aware of any explosive bolts.

I do know, however, that the MIRs have the ability to shed components if necessary to increase bouyancy. There is something like 300 kilos of weights attached to the bottom that can be dropped, as well as propellor shrouds and the like. The last thing to go would be the batteries. Since these cost hundreds of thousands of dollars to replace, the Russians are reluctant to let go of them. However, I don't think it's possible to separate the sphere from the rest of the sub.

Personally, I would not relish the idea of spinning like I was inside a washing machine for the two hours it would take to surface from the depth of the Titanic.

My longest ascent in the MIR was five hours and forty-five minutes, but this was from 16,000 feet. We drained the batteries on the bottom, so it was nearly impossible to pump out the ballast tanks. I went to sleep for an hour after we left the bottom, and we were still 15,000 feet deep when I woke up. It took us three hours just to get us up to the depth of the TITANIC.
 
Jan 29, 2001
1,282
0
221
David I hope that you will pardon me...It is the primary submersible ALVIN which is equipped with self rescue technology this being the explosive bolts.

I had what is classified as "minor" head trauma when I was struck by a car on 13 Feb., and I am still in the recovery process which explains my partial misspellings and lapsed memory.

Thank you for understanding.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Nov 29, 2005
85
2
88
Michael,

No problem. I have had several of those "minor" traumas myself. they last an annoyingly long time. Get well soon.

Best regards,
David
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,631
445
453
Easley South Carolina
A follow up to the above story about the MIR's current activities from the Mail and Gaurdian:

Russian mini-subs lay claim to Arctic wealth
quote:

Russia symbolically staked its claim to billions of dollars worth of oil and gas reserves in the Arctic Ocean on Thursday as two mini-submarines reached the sea bed four kilometres beneath the North Pole.

In a record-breaking dive the two craft planted a one metre-high titanium Russian flag on the underwater Lomonosov ridge, which Moscow claims is directly connected to its continental shelf.

But the dangerous mission prompted ridicule and scepticism among other contenders for the Arctic's energy wealth, with Canada comparing it to a 15th-century colonial land-grab.
More at http://www.mg.co.za/articlePage.aspx?articleid=315766&area=/breaking_news/breaking_news__international_news/
 

Steven Hall

Member
Dec 17, 2008
648
5
113
That will be their bargaining chip Mike over the missile defence program.
They'll drop the Artic claim if the missile defence program is dropped.
And or, they'll allow the claim and let them of the reserves of oil and gas they claim.
It's a very clever move.
 
Jan 29, 2001
1,282
0
221
David C:

Something that has always puzzled me about diving in a deep-sea submersible...is there any pressure (6500 p.s.i) sensation on the sphere while the sub/s are attaining their extreme depth? Also I noted in one of your post an ascent from 16000'.
Is this additional depth owing to the fact that TITANIC rests in a submarine canyon? Was the additional depth attained in your search for the double-bottom section? I was taken aback when you guys were piloting thru the aft coal field...it was so pathridden in it's make-up.

I recall Yann Houards interview during a systems check aboard NAUTILE ('94)..."We know that the sphere is o.k., it is very, very safe. We don't think about nightmare, we don't think about danger.
The pressure is so high, if for any reason the sub had to collapse, it would be very, very quick, half a second, we could'nt see anything. We know that this would'nt arrive, we know this would'nt happen".

After the interview...he wore a happy confident smile!

(BTW, thank you for your well wishes Sir. My Mom said "Michael you gotta get back on your horse"... my reply..."Yes Mother but my horse is alot taller this time, I am 49 now!".)

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 

Jason D. Tiller

Moderator
Member
Dec 3, 2000
8,248
11
308
Niagara Falls, Ontario
From Nature.com:

Scientists to dive to the bottom of the world's deepest lake

quote:

In an adventure worthy of Jules Verne, Russian scientists are preparing to dive to a depth of 1,637 metres – the very bottom of Siberia’s Lake Baikal.

The team will make its first attempt at the record dive tomorrow, using the manned submersibles MIR 1 and MIR 2 – already famous for their performance in the movie Titanic.
For the rest, http://www.nature.com/news/2008/080728/full/news.2008.986.html
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,631
445
453
Easley South Carolina
From The BBC:

Russian sub 'could stop oil leak'
quote:

Russian-owned submersibles would be able to cap the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico, the captain of one of the vessels has said.

The skipper was speaking as two of the subs - which can dive to 6,000m - started a campaign of exploration at the bottom of Lake Baikal in Siberia.
More at http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science_and_environment/10564798.stm
 
Jan 29, 2001
1,282
0
221
Exactly Michael...like I was explaining to my family and friends, the deep-sea submersible's spend a minimum of 12 Hrs. in the deep, sometimes greater than the 12,500' Titanic wreck, furthur more a *hands on* operation.
In my case I used the French Nautile as an example. Ifremer as well as Academic Keldysh (MIRS) are well versed in deep-sea operations.

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,631
445
453
Easley South Carolina
Dec 2, 2000
58,631
445
453
Easley South Carolina

Similar threads