The Mount Temple


Jim Currie

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Apr 16, 2008
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B
Hi Jim,

"Prime" as in add the detonator charge?

Cheers,

Julian
Yes, Julian. in the same was as a match to a fuse.

In practice, on land and sea, explosives and the means of igniting them -detonators, matches etc - have to be kept separate. The conditions of storage and carriage are contained in the Explosive Act of 1875 and subsequent amendments thereto.
 
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Chris P

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Oct 31, 2020
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The tone of 3 commentators is harsh against a fourth. Observed before. Even against an innocent passenger...Dr. Q.
Why? Senan's book seems important. Mount Temple is suspicious.
 
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Jim Currie

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The tone of 3 commentators is harsh against a fourth. Observed before. Even against an innocent passenger...Dr. Q.
Why? Senan's book seems important. Mount Temple is suspicious.
The ship was innocent, Chris;) but you are correct.
By working backward , you could drive adouble decker bus through the evidence given by her Master. This begs the question.. if this can be done retrospectively - why wasn't it done at the time?
 
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Jim I regard when a ship is in trouble and requires assistant not just by sinking but for other reasons to, like broken rudder, propeller, prop shaft, engine or just run out of fuel. Where there is a distress signal available like firing rockets high in the air to bring attention to a near by ship. However since the BOT have interduce the idea they should of taken more serious and made sure crew members where pretrained. I put the blame on the BOT and not the crew members.
Just a matter of intertest was there a shelf life on these rockets?
That's a good question. I looked it up but didn't find anything for that era. I've loaded pretty much everything the U.S. Navy had in the 70's from 45 cal pistol's up to and including B-61 nuclear bombs. I've never seen an expiration date on anything. What they did have have was lot numbers with the date of manufacture. If stored properly (that's the key) they should last decades. With what Titanic's rockets were made of that would apply to them also. But most of the procedures today didn't come until well after Titanic. But they are constantly being revised. I've shot surplus military ammo that was 40 years old with no problem other than you needed to really clean your rifle extra good because they were dirty and corrosive propellants back then. So I doubt they had an advertised shelf life for Titanic's rockets. But if you find different please post it as I would be interested to know. Thanks.
 

Chris P

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It all very well saying they are highly intelligent individual's reading instructions. But they still need the practical experience.
I see it today you can all the University degrees under the sun on how to drive a manual car from a book. But it not the same when comes to the practical side for the first time!
They would be shown these on naval training ship, as able seamen very likely as were low ranked officers and at navigation college to which Boxhall went.
 

Chris P

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Oct 31, 2020
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The ship was innocent, Chris;) but you are correct.
By working backward , you could drive adouble decker bus through the evidence given by her Master. This begs the question.. if this can be done retrospectively - why wasn't it done at the time?
Indeed. Time for the conspiracy theorists?
 
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