The New Age of Passenger Liners

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Thomas Ford

Member
What are the safety standards for these extra large cruise ships,besides lifeboats for all,lol.
do they have to have a certain amount of bulkheads?
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Standards could be anything from fire doors having to be certain yards apart on certain decks depending on the ships size. Emergency steering and such or back ups for the main machinary. Backups for radar fire sprinkler system. Water discharge systems and the newer inflatable rafts that will deploy if the ship sinks before the crew is able to launch them. Those are just a few.

Erik
 
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Yuri Singleton

Member
Check out these old salts! A news report about a group of WW2 veterans that are sailing an old navy ship from Greece back to Alabama to make it into a museum. Trouble is, the US Coast Guard says the ship is a death trap and that the crew of vets is not capable of managing her on a transatlantic voyage if rough weather should catch up with them.
So what did they decide to do? "To hell with the Coast Guard.", is what one of them is reported as saying. They departed Greece a couple of weeks ago.

They have a web site that contains an online log book of the voyage.

I think they are taking a big risk, and not showing much respect for safety. But, at their age and considering what they went through 60 years ago, if they want to have one more trip in the old lady, well Godspeed!

Yuri

http://www.abcnews.go.com/sections/us/DailyNews/warship001207.html
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Yuri, I agree with you on the risk these guys are taking. Inadaquate lifesaving equipment and NO emergency power source, plus trying to navigate the Atlantic this time of the year in a 68 year old hull is a chancy game to play. All the more so when you consider that an LST's reletively shallow draft...3.4 meters for this ship...and flat bottom (This type of ship is designed to be beached to offload troops and cargo) make for a lousy seaboat.

I'm already praying that these chaps don't end up as a mystery for the Bermuda Triangle crowd to crow about.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Hello Fellas,

I just went to the website Yuri and it was a good one. I have never been on a boat like the one is question but I don't know if I would want to travel on something older then me when it hasn't had a refit.

After doing some digging I found some rather interesting things on the Queen Elizabeth that I thought might be of intrest. In the early 1990's after a refit that was completed around December the company (Cunard) decided to book passengers although the refit was not complete for a christmas cruise. Well word got in the London papers that she not all that seaworthy yet and she still needed some work. Needless to say she left with as many as she could carry and made the trip to New York.

However what no one knew at the time was that the U.S Coast Guard Inpsections Office in London had seen the papers and had called the Inspections Office in New York. When the QE2 had arrived the Coast Guard was waiting for her and upon there boarding found such things as lifeboats inoperative, cracks in the bulwark hull problems. Welding cables that ran down used passageways. No hot work permits for in port. Countless other things. Needless to say the Captain who I believe may have been the second Warick to have command of the ship was screaming and yelling not all that happy about the voyage being halted. The company had to fly all of it's passengers home and refund money.

It goes to show you that even the best ships have bad days. Cunard is known for its fairly spotless record and prides itself on its royal mysteek.

Some other info that may be of interest is that as Yuri pointed out NCL and Carnival is in talks with the State and City Governments to open a small hub in Galvston for the Carribean and eventually a Panama Canal run that will end in Long Beach California or possibly San Diego. Long Beach is in talks with Carnival to open a new hub there for the Alaskan run as well as a Hawaiian run and stops in San Fransico have become more and more popular. Long Beach and Carnival are talking to Disney who owns the land that the Queen sits on and where the Sprouse Goose used to be. If this becomes a reality. Carnival will send its oldest two ships and then one new to the new hub.

P.S. My info on the QE2 was gained through contacts in the Coast Guard as well as a London Newspaper.

Erik
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
Good stuff Erik! Hey, not all of us are fellas!!!Let's hear it for the sea-going ladies. Now refresh my memory- the QE2 ran aground off Nantucket I think in 1995-an uncharted outcropping or something- really messed up the hull. I think she went into Bremerhaven for repairs-6 million or something obscene like that. Anybody remember? I have made 2 cruises on her- I heard the Mauretania Restaurant is gone-true? My big thrill was seeing the Aquitania bell in her officer's wardroom back in '91.
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Shelly,

I most sincerly apologize. My posts are for all. As to your questions I am not exactly sure what year but the places that you mention are correct and it wasn't exactly uncharted it just wasnt' on there chart. The Mauretania I think was replaced by the Caronia restrauant. Not exactly sure though. I have had the privlage of serving on the QE2 as well as traveling her as a passenger. However since I am known I get a little different treatment.

Erik
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
Erik- do you mean you get BETTER treatment or worse treatment since they know you!? Which is the deck that runs from bow to stern? One night we had a footrace at 2 am down this loooong corridor. It is so long that it appears crooked when viewed at one end.
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
Erik- do you mean you get BETTER treatment or worse treatment since they know you!? Which is the deck that runs from bow to stern? One night we had a footrace at 2 am down this loooong corridor. It is so long that it appears crooked when viewed at one end.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
If anyone is interested in salvaged fittings, I know of some now which are installed on a modern cruise ship. Specifically the panalings and fittings from the A'la Carte Restaurant of the RMS Olympic, which now sail on board the Celebrity Cruise Lines MV. Millenium as the Olympic Restaurant. See pages 140-145 of the Volumn 24 Number 151 issue of The Titanic Commutator for details. I just got mine in the mail yesterday.

George Behe and Inger Sheil have articals in this latest issue as well. Good job to both!
Happy


Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Hello All,

I am not sure what the deck is on the QE2 on some it is A deck or Promenade deck it depends on the layout of the ship. Queen Mary has one on I believe E Deck.

Erik
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Hello All,

I have some more info for you it is now against regulations to have a corridor run the length of the ship without fire doors every 250 (give or take a few feet)feet. You will notice that now days most ships have a rather large atrium or a big space like that. In the early 1990's a new chapter to CFR (Code of Federal Regulations) had to be written the number of the CFR has escaped me like so many other things do. The Queen Mary as I stated earlier does have a corridor that runs the full lenght of the ship. You will also find that most of the modern cruise ships have returned to some of the traditional interiors. Celebrity Cruises and even the newer Carnival ships have more classy and less jazzy interiors. The reasoning behind that his younger people are becoming older people and most older people like class and jazz.

On a more personal note. I got a rather "nasty" email from Senior Captian Frank Johansen of NCL and current Standing Captain of the Norway for and I quote: "Woody I thought that you would have hyped up steam a lot more in some of your posts but instead you start to tell all of the [email protected]#$ sea stories that I have heard a hundred times." I will have you know that informed dear Captain Johansen that we here on the encyclopdia titanica message board are more evolved than to base our life around steam travel. Of course after stating and sending that reply I realized that how incredbly wrong I was. Especially about me. My life is steam and my dreams are Titanic.

Erik
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Well shucks Erik, you can always make nice to him later on. Better yet, since he seems to be lurking, why not invite him to join up and start contributing. I'd enjoy chatting with another ships captain. He could start by getting a thread going on the Norway.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Erik Wood

Member
Michael,

Frank is a rather conservitive man. I posted it as a joke. I had informed him how techincal we had gotten and that some of the threads might instrest him seeing as he has a rather high interst in Titanic as well. I would appear to me that he only read my sea stories that yes he has heard a hundred times instead of reading the good stuff. But not to fear Captain Johansen enjoys lively talk on ships in general and although he has refused my many attempts to join the board he may get there soon.

Besides next time he views the board I am sure that I will not live down the fact that I have posted some 270 messages. I am not sure if that is this year or over the last quarter. PHIL IF YOU POP INTO THIS THREAD MAYBE YOU COULD ANSWER THAT FOR US.

Erik
 
Shelley Dziedzic

Shelley Dziedzic

Member
I wonder if you know about the Steamship Historical Society- real STEAM lovers. Mostly sidewheelers, Hudson River and Fall River Boats, channel steamers, etc, but their publication Steamboat Bill has a nice section on liners and often feature stories -their archive at University of Baltimore (Maryland) is second to NONE. Check out their transat passenger liner collection at http://www.ubalt.edu/archives/Ship/Transatlantic I used to be regional secretary years ago and we had some MIGHTY fine speakers, including the son of the Moran tugboat line owner who told an interesting tale about Franklin knowing plenty about the Titanic's fate after he overheard a conversation on the phone between Franklin and White Star brass-if this is true, Franklin knew the grim story long before it became public knowledge and was sitting on it to allow the line to formulate a plan. This man- if he is still alive lives in Ft. Lee New Jersey-he was a young child at the time.-Interesting.
 
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