The North Atlantic run


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Jun 10, 1999
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Hello:

Another topic that is hotly debated...Was TITANIC trying to make a record (White Star) run by perhaps "cutting" the corner?

Amongst my collection is a beautifully preserved WHITE STAR LINE passenger list from a voyage of S.S. CYMRIC on Tuesday 2nd July 1912. The commander was F.B. Howarth R.N.R.

The passenger kept a meticulous pencil written accounting of the voyage on the provided last page...memorandum of log. It was a departure from Liverpool to Boston. Now, what I found interesting were two particular days of tracking the voyage. July 8 LAT. 38 10, LONG. 46 47. Distance was recorded as 375. Moving forward to July 11 LAT. 42 18, LONG. 67 36. Distance was recorded 289. The memorandum closes with...To Boston Light 138. Total 2963 (I assume miles of voyage).

What makes this particular passenger list of historical and sentimental value to me...amongst the passengers listed were Mrs. Frank Goldsmith and Mr. Frank Goldsmith (son). Also the cover and ad contents are indentical to TITANIC's passenger list.

It just seems such an extreme diversion of S.S. CYRIC's steaming course. Perhaps it was owing to the disaster which befell TITANIC just months earlier?

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>It just seems such an extreme diversion of S.S. CYRIC's steaming course. Perhaps it was owing to the disaster which befell TITANIC just months earlier?<<

As I understand it, the shipping lanes were shifted south in the wake of the Titanic disaster. It was one of the many (And some cases kneejerk) reactions to the accident. In this instance, it was one of the more sensible ones. You can't have an accident with icebergs if you make a point of not being where they are.
 

Dave Gittins

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In the wake of the disaster, shipping lanes were hastily altered. Some sent ships as far south as 38 North.

The details are on page 1123 of the US inquiry. (Note, there is a typo in the transcript. At one place it has 30 instead of 38.)

I don't know if these tracks continued to be used after the initial flap died down. They have the appearance of panic measures.

As to Titanic "cutting the corner", there should be no debate at all. She was spot on the prescribed westbound track by the standards of 1912.
 
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The shipping lanes were apparently altered many times. By 1931 the westbound corner point was at 43°00'N, 50°00'W. The eastbound point at 42°00'N, 50°00'W. This was in March and April. (They show the same westbound point for September as well.) These are from Olympic's course books. The transatlantic part of the voyage measured from Bishop Rock to the corner to the Nantucket LV then to Ambrose LV. Those corner points in 1931 were further north than the southern route taken by Titanic in 1912. By then they had the IIP patrolling the region.
 
Jun 10, 1999
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Thank you gentlemen...the altered course must have rendered due comfort to the GOLDSMITH's aboard S.S. CYMRIC on that particular voyage...so soon after losing their loved one(s)

Michael Cundiff
NV, USA
 
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