The Officers' Bathtub

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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There are pipes and taps visible, but not necessarily still in their right positions above the bathtub - keep in mind that you're looking at wreckage.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
What? no way.It was not visible to my eyes at all.
Maybe those taps were for the sink.
You can see captain Smiths bathtub with animal paws feet as legs,those bathtubs with animal paw feet legs don't normanly come with taps,well thanks how i thought.You're an expert so i go with you, buti'm really shocked.
 
There's got to be somewhat to control the flow and temperature of water, Alyson. The tap would have been above the tub and the faucet handles would have been above that still...directly on the pipe. Probably compared to the industrial valve control on pipes in your basement.

(For future reference, the iron tubs with feet that resemble animals' feet are commonly referred to as "claw-foot tubs".)

That being said, I don't want to picture Captain Smith in the bathtub...claw-foot, flushmount, hipbath, barrel in the middle of the room, garden hose in the back yard or anything else. Thank you.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Jeremy.I was just stating that i never saw the taps above the bathtub. I did say i believe him but i was just shocked.
I think in 1800's people would of used buckets to fill up there baths. I must of gotten confussed abit.
happy.gif
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>I think in 1800's people would of used buckets to fill up there baths.<<

And in a lot of places they still would. However, plumbing was well in use and even expected on the liners, especially the crack express liners of the North Atlantic which were expected to have the latest in just about any innovation.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>And in a lot of places they still would. However, plumbing was well in use and even expected on the liners, especially the crack express liners of the North Atlantic which were expected to have the latest in just about any innovation.<<

Well that explains it for me.I knew that baths did not have taps connected back in those days. I did not realize that she was that luxguished.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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A plumbed-in bath could have the taps directly mounted on it (at the side or one end) or separate but obviously directly above the tub - same options as today. Very few people, of course, could afford such a luxury in their own homes. For most, bath night involved hauling a portable tin bath in front of the fire in the back parlour and filling it from kettles of water heated on the kitchen stove. It was common in those times (and much later) to keep a kettle permanently on the boil, so that tea could be made or hot water supplied for washing at any time.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
>>For most, bath night involved hauling a portable tin bath in front of the fire in the back parlour and filling it from kettles of water heated on the kitchen stove<<

That's what i thought Captain Smith had.Which i was proven wrong lol.